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  • - In this video, I interview Jordan Harbinger,

  • who's interviewed over 700 people

  • and has over 200 million podcast downloads.

  • And we talk about his tips for how

  • to do better interviews, his advice

  • for leveling up your content,

  • and his tips for body language

  • so you can crush your on-camera presence comin' up.

  • (upbeat music)

  • - [Announcer] This video is brought to you

  • by LearnVideo.live, a free, one-hour,

  • online training on how to grow a highly influential

  • and profitable YouTube channel this year.

  • To get free access, just go to LearnVideo.live.

  • - Hey, what's up, guys, Sean here with video influencers,

  • help you build your influence, income and impact

  • with online video, and I'm super pumped

  • to be standing here today with Jordan Harbinger.

  • How's it going?

  • - Good, man, thanks for the opportunity.

  • - Pumped to have you on the show.

  • We're here at Social Media Marketing World in San Diego.

  • And we're gonna be talking

  • about how to level up your content,

  • and, really, actually, with some body language

  • things and also how to interview people better.

  • Jordan's done over 700 interviews.

  • He's actually had one of the longest-running

  • interview shows, over a decade, and over 200 million

  • downloads on his podcast.

  • So he knows a lot, and I'm pumped to be learning

  • from you today.

  • - Yeah, I'm excited to be here, man.

  • There's a lot of stuff I've learned through mistakes,

  • and I would love to share a lot of those mistakes.

  • - I'm pumped.

  • Well, let's talk about content first.

  • - Sure. - Because, you know, we've

  • all heard the phrase, content is king.

  • - Yes. - You're a content creator

  • yourself, but not all content is created equal.

  • Not every interview show is

  • created equal. - That's true.

  • - And you've learned a lot about content.

  • I was even listening to your show recently,

  • which is great, and we'll talk about that later.

  • But you were talking about also how much

  • effort you put into it.

  • So break down some of the things you think

  • that makes great standout content.

  • - Sure.

  • When I first started interviewing,

  • I thought, you know, I'm totally faking my way through this.

  • I'm entertaining a little bit.

  • I feel like I'm kinda smart, so I can wing it,

  • and I'm doing a really good job winging it.

  • But one time years ago, I read the book

  • for the guest and then I read another one

  • of his books, and I thought this is a really good writer.

  • I'm really enjoying this.

  • So I did an interview with him,

  • and he said, "Wow, this is one of the best

  • "interviews that I've done in years.

  • "Why did this take so long?"

  • And the answer, truthfully, was,

  • well, I didn't feel like I could

  • do a good interview, 'cause I never

  • read any of your stuff.

  • I didn't tell him that, but then I decided,

  • I thought, look, if I read all of the books

  • and I go through the Wikipedia and I've researched

  • the guest and I go through their bio

  • and then I look at other interviews that they've done,

  • I can do a better interview than anyone else

  • has done, because I outworked them.

  • 'Cause I used to think, uh, it's talent.

  • It's just working hard.

  • You gotta be funny or entertaining.

  • No, you can outwork people,

  • and then you can create something better.

  • The problem is, most of us, we don't really

  • want to outwork people.

  • We just kinda wanna put more content

  • out there, see what sticks to the wall,

  • and then rinse and repeat until we are internet famous.

  • - That's powerful.

  • So you just thought I'm gonna put more work into it.

  • - Yeah. - I'm not just gonna

  • wing this.

  • I'm gonna do my research.

  • I'm gonna go deep.

  • Well, that's awesome, but let's actually

  • take a step back because I want to get

  • your tips on interviews, but how did this

  • whole thing start for you?

  • What was your story of getting into interviews

  • and even getting to where you are today?

  • - Yeah, so I used to be an attorney,

  • and that was as exciting as it sounds.

  • And I knew that I wasn't,

  • speaking of outworking people,

  • I knew I wasn't the smartest guy at that law firm.

  • I was trying to outwork people,

  • but now I'm at Wall Street at a law firm,

  • everybody's working 20 hours a day.

  • I'm not outworking these people.

  • I'm not gonna make myself smarter fast enough

  • for my career to take off.

  • And then I thought, wait a minute.

  • If I don't have a competitive advantage,

  • probably gonna get fired.

  • And so I wanted to work from home

  • because I thought if I work from home,

  • they won't know that I don't belong here.

  • So one of the partners was never in the office,

  • and I thought, okay, I'm gonna ask this guy

  • how he got to work from home,

  • 'cause he's never in the office.

  • So I cornered him one day.

  • I was like, hey, Dave, how come you're

  • never in the office?

  • You know, do you just work from home a lot,

  • thinking I'm gonna get the secret phrase

  • you tell the rest of the partners

  • so that you don't have to come to the office.

  • And he goes, "No, I'm bringing in deals.

  • "I'm creating relationships."

  • And then I thought well, if I can learn

  • to do that, I'll have a new competitive advantage,

  • so I decided to go out and practice body language

  • and psychology and all these books that

  • I was reading on networking.

  • And I started working on that stuff,

  • and I started teaching other people that stuff

  • because they were interested.

  • And then I was burning CDs.

  • This is how old this was.

  • Burning CDs, putting them in my pocket,

  • and when someone would go, hey, how come

  • you seem to know everybody at this bar?

  • Or how come you got this offer for this cool thing?

  • I would whip out one of my fancy burned CDs

  • and hand it to them.

  • Then one time, a friend of mine goes,

  • "Why don't you just put this up as a podcast?

  • "I heard this new thing about podcasting.

  • "You should try it."

  • I went to the iTunes store,

  • and there were 800 shows in there,

  • and I went, 800 shows, no one's ever gonna find this!

  • So I uploaded the first episode of the podcast,

  • really enjoyed it, started interviewing

  • people out of laziness.

  • I was creating my own content,

  • and then I went oh, this is hard.

  • Maybe if I interview somebody,

  • they'll do the work, and I can just

  • sit there and go cool, all right, amazing, right?

  • And so I started doing that,

  • and I did that for years.

  • And people were like this is really interesting content.

  • I realized I was the weakest link

  • because I was good at finding guests,

  • but I wasn't really doing anything special,

  • and the competition was heating up

  • with more and more shows.

  • So I started to outwork and work harder,

  • because that was the only thing I knew how to do.

  • I don't know how to get smarter that much faster

  • than the normal pace, but I do know how

  • to outwork people.

  • And I figured if that's my competitive advantage,

  • along with the relationships that I'm creating,

  • then I can put that into a really good show.

  • And that's what I've been doing for the last

  • 12 years, 11 years.