Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Hi, I'm Martin.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn how to use the verbs 'make' and 'do' in different

  • ways.

  • You'll see the differences between 'make' and 'do', and all the meanings of each

  • verb.

  • You'll also see phrasal verbs and collocations with 'make' and 'do'.

  • Here's a question: have you visited our website yet?

  • If you want to learn English, we have many resources to help you, as well as teachers

  • you can take online lessons with if you want!

  • Oxford Online English dot com.

  • Let's look at our lesson.

  • What's the difference between 'make' and 'do'?

  • What are you doing?

  • I'm making a shopping list.

  • I need some stuff to make dinner.

  • What are you going to make?

  • I think some kind of stir-fry.

  • I have to do some work, too, so I need something quick.

  • Sounds tasty!

  • Why do you have to work?

  • I have to make a presentation for our meeting tomorrow, and I need to check through what

  • I've written, and maybe change a few things.

  • By the way, can you do the washing-up before I get back?

  • I'd like to start cooking as soon as I get in.

  • I need to do everything and get to bed early.

  • Sure, I'll do it now.

  • Here, you saw three ways to use 'do' and three ways to use 'make'.

  • Can you remember them?

  • Imagine you're an English teacher.

  • Could you explain the basic difference between 'do' and 'make' to someone?

  • How would you do it?

  • Think about it!

  • 'Do' means to perform an activity or a task.

  • For example, you do work, do the washing-up, or do everything.

  • 'Make' means to create something and/or produce a result.

  • If you make a shopping list, make dinner, or make a presentation, then you create something;

  • there's a result at the end of the process.

  • That's the basic difference between 'do' and 'make'.

  • In the rest of this lesson, you'll learn about 'do' and 'make' in more detail,

  • but keep this basic idea in your head.

  • What's that?

  • I'm making a card for Sasha's leaving party.

  • I thought it would be nicer to make it myself, rather than just buy something.

  • How's it going?

  • It's a lot harder than I thought it would be!

  • This is my second attempt.

  • I made a lot of mistakes first time and I had to throw it away, but now I think I'm

  • making progress.

  • What happened in the kitchen?

  • Did you make all that mess?

  • Ah

  • Yeah

  • I need to make a cake, too.

  • I mean, I've started making a cake.

  • Let me guess: 'harder than you thought it would be'?

  • Yeah

  • A little.

  • I'm trying to make an orange and chocolate sponge.

  • There's chocolate all over the walls!

  • What happened?

  • Well, the mixer was making a strange noise, so I took the lid off to see if there was

  • a problem, but I forgot to turn it off, so the chocolate mixture went everywhere.

  • Don't worry; I'll clean it up.

  • You can use 'make' when you create a result.

  • You can use 'make' for things with a physical result, like 'make a card', 'make a

  • cake', or 'make dinner'.

  • You can also use 'make' for non-physical results, like 'make a mistake', 'make

  • progress' or 'make a noise'.

  • Here's a question: can you think of more examples like this?

  • Pause the video and try to find three more examples of phrases with 'make' which

  • describe *physical* results, and three which describe *non-physical* results.

  • Can't think of three?

  • Try to find one, or two!

  • Pause the video and do it now.

  • Ready?

  • What did you get?

  • For physical results, it's common to use 'make' with food and drink, like 'make

  • a sandwich', 'make a cup of coffee', or 'make pizza.'

  • You can also 'make a toy', 'make a chair', or 'make a shelf', if you can do it yourself.

  • You can say that companies make things; for example, 'Apple makes the iPhone', or 'Honda

  • makes cars'.

  • For non-physical results, there are many possibilities.

  • You could say 'make a joke', 'make a suggestion', 'make a friend', or 'make

  • an appointment.'

  • It's also common to use 'make' with money words, like 'make money', 'make

  • a profit' or 'make an investment.'

  • Did you get any of these phrases?

  • Did you find examples that we didn't?

  • Please share your ideas in the comments!

  • Next, let's look at a slightly different way to use 'make'.

  • What's wrong?

  • Did something happen?

  • What?

  • No, nothing.

  • You look sad.

  • It's my allergies.

  • At this time of year, they make my face really puffy.

  • Plus, they make my eyes water.

  • Are you taking anything?

  • Yeah, I take antihistamines, but they don't help that much, and they make me sleepy.

  • What are you allergic to?

  • Pollen?

  • I think so, but it makes me sensitive to other things, too, like dust.

  • It's bad, but it only lasts four weeks or so.

  • You can use 'make' to mean 'produce a reaction in someone.'

  • Similar to the last section, this could be a physical reaction, as in: 'They make my

  • face really puffy,' 'They make my eyes water.'

  • 'The antihistamines make me sleepy.'

  • You could also use it for emotional reactions.

  • For example: 'The news made him angry.'

  • 'Thinking about what he said made me happy.'

  • Finally, you can use 'make' for reactions which are both physical and emotional, like

  • this: 'It was such a sad film.

  • It made me cry for hours.'

  • 'He's so funny.

  • He makes me laugh all the time.'

  • OK, here's a task for you.

  • Look at three questions: Can you answer these three questions for yourself?

  • Pause the video, and make your answers.

  • You can write them down, say them out loud, or both.

  • OK?

  • Could you do it?

  • Of course, everyone's answers will be different, but here are three suggestions: 'Being outside

  • on a beautiful day makes me really happy.'

  • 'The last thing that made me laugh was a joke my colleague made in a meeting this morning.'

  • 'Someone not telling the truth could make me angry.'

  • Were your answers similar, or not?

  • Feel free to post your answers in the comments and share them with other learners.

  • Now, you've seen many ways to use 'make'.

  • What about 'do'?

  • Have you done the report for our sales meeting tomorrow?

  • No.

  • I won't be here.

  • Did you not get my email?

  • What email?

  • I sent it to you last week.

  • I've been doing a course on digital marketing, and tomorrow I have to do the final exam.

  • So, who'll do the report?

  • I don't know!

  • Is there no way you can do it?

  • Sorry, no.

  • I've done most of my work for today, and then I'm going straight home to do some

  • last-minute revision.

  • Remember that 'do' means that you perform a task or an activity.

  • You often use it to talk about things you do at work or school.

  • Look at three examples you heard in the dialogue.

  • Can you remember how to complete the missing words?

  • Can you get the answers?

  • You'll see them in a second.

  • So, you can 'do work', 'do business', 'do a deal', 'do a report', and so

  • on.

  • You can also use 'do' with other kinds of work, like 'do housework' or 'do

  • homework'.

  • Also, you can use 'do' for many things connected with school and education.

  • You 'do research', 'do exams', 'do a course', 'do revision' and 'do a

  • subject'.

  • With some of these, you can use other verbs, too.

  • For example, you can 'do an exam', or 'take an exam'.

  • You can also use 'take' with 'course' or 'subject'.

  • For example, you can say 'I have to take four subjects in my first year of university,'

  • or 'I have to do four subjects in my first year…'

  • There's no difference in meaning; it doesn't matter which you use.

  • Let's look at one more common way to use 'do'.

  • Have you done anything about the washing machine?

  • No, not yet.

  • Well, when are you going to do something?

  • It's been a week.

  • I'm running out of clean clothes!

  • You could do it too, you know.

  • I can't do everything around here!

  • What do you mean 'do everything'?

  • You've done nothing all day!

  • You spent the morning watching cartoons in your underwear!

  • Fine, I'll do it tomorrow.