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  • Between 2004 and 2008,

  • I unsuccessfully tried to get into the Kenyan music industry.

  • But the recurring answer from producers

  • was I was not Kenyan enough.

  • Meaning what?

  • I didn't sing fully in the slang derivative of Kiswahili

  • and I didn't sing enough party tracks,

  • so they said Kenyans wouldn't listen to a Kenyan who sounded like me.

  • This idea of otherism,

  • the exclusion of a person

  • based on their perceived deviation from the norms,

  • goes to the root of the problems in Kenya.

  • And it runs deep.

  • Kenya was invented by colonialists in 1895,

  • and with it, came the erasure of our identity

  • and the class system built on otherism.

  • So by 1963, when we received our independence,

  • these ideas had already become the new normal.

  • Now, we've tried a lot of different ways to move forward since.

  • We have a common language, currency, infrastructure,

  • basically all the things that make a country a country.

  • But all these efforts at nation-building

  • do not go to the heart of the matter.

  • Which is this:

  • we cannot build what we do not truly love.

  • And we cannot love until we love ourselves.

  • The thing we have to heal, us Kenyans,

  • is our lack of self-love,

  • our deep self-hate

  • and our existential identity crisis.

  • And this is the work of nation-building

  • that only the creative industry can do.

  • The idea that Kenya can only include some of us

  • led me to found a music festival in 2008 called Blankest and Wine,

  • to give a platform to myself and other misfits.

  • Ten years later, we've programmed over 200 bands

  • and put at least 100,000 dollars

  • directly into the hands of artists and managers,

  • who have in turn spent it on technicians, rehearsals,

  • music videos and other things along the music value chain.

  • Our platform has allowed for multiple Kenyan identities to exist,

  • while inspiring the industry to discover and engage

  • the wide variety of Kenyan music.

  • What we do is necessary but insufficient.

  • And we must urgently pivot into a live music circuit.

  • But there are other ways music can help heal the nation.

  • According to a 2018 state of media report,

  • traditional radio is sill by far the biggest distributor of ideas in Kenya,

  • with 47 percent of Kenyans still choosing radio first.

  • This presents an opportunity.

  • We can use radio to help Kenyans hear the diversity that is Kenya.

  • We can reserve 60 percent of all programing on Kenyan radio

  • for Kenyan music.

  • We can break down ethnic barriers

  • by playing Kenyan music done in English, Kiswahili

  • and other ethnic languages,

  • on what is now single-language ethnic radio.

  • Radio can help stimulate interest and demand

  • for Kenyan music by Kenyans,

  • while also providing the much-needed incomes

  • by way of royalties.

  • But more importantly,

  • radio can help us build a more inclusive narrative about Kenya.

  • For you cannot love what you do not know exists.

  • Other creative industries too can do the work.

  • When you consider that 41 percent of Kenyans

  • still choose TV as their primary medium,

  • it's obvious that film has a huge potential.

  • The meager resources that have been put into the sector

  • have already produced world-class acts,

  • like Lupita Nyong'o and Wanuri Kahiu,

  • but we are going to need a lot more incentives and investments

  • to make filming in Kenya easier,

  • so more Kenyan stories can get on the Kenyan TV

  • and spark off the really difficult conversations

  • we need to have with one another.

  • We're going to need to grow a lot more home-grown stars,

  • so we can reverse the idea

  • that we have to blow up abroad

  • before we get the acceptance and validation of home.

  • Fashion too can do the work.

  • We need to make it possible

  • to affordably mass-produce Kenyan clothes for Kenyan consumers,

  • so we don't all have to rely on second-hand imports.

  • The first running shoe made in Kenya

  • needs to be a local and global success

  • as an ode to Kenyan excellence,

  • epitomized by Kenyan runners, who are literally world-class.

  • For these ideas to come to life,

  • jobs will be created,

  • and Kenyan ideas will be exported.

  • But more importantly,

  • Kenyans may finally consider themselves worthy

  • of the love that we reserve for others.

  • Kenya's creative industry is dynamic,

  • cosmopolitan, forward-looking,

  • and without a doubt,

  • a true manufacturing industry of the immediate future.

  • But its true power lies in its ability to help heal the psyche of Kenya,

  • so we can finally build a nation for real.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

  • (Applause)

  • For this song, I'd like us all to take a minute

  • and think about immigrant communities,

  • and especially refugee immigrant communities,

  • and the daily struggle they have to endure,

  • building a life with dignity and meaning

  • away from everything they have loved and known.

  • If you feel any empathy for this idea,

  • I ask to see your fist up in the air with me.

  • (Music)

  • "Million voice."

  • The mandem make some noise

  • With a million, million voice

  • All the mandem make some noise

  • With a million, million voice

  • Can't stop I, won't stop I

  • With a million, million voice

  • Can't stop I, won't stop I

  • With a million, million voice

  • This one dedicated to my people building something

  • Working hard to make sure that their children will lack for nothing

  • When them people come around and treat them like they're basic

  • I just want to LOL and tell them to consider all their options

  • Caution, natural distortion

  • You can't even kill us we survive even abortion

  • Say we cannot make it, watch us how we make it

  • Watch us in a minute come and run and overtake it

  • TED, clap!

  • Can't have enough of it

  • This our only way of life

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • TED, will you clap like this.

  • Can't have enough of it

  • This our only way of life

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • The mandem make some noise

  • Like a million, million voice

  • All the mandem make some noise

  • With a million, million voice

  • Can't stop I, won't stop I

  • With a million, million voice

  • Can't stop I, won't stop I

  • With a million, million voice

  • Can I be your leader

  • Can I be your Caesar

  • If I show you how to make some more will you pledge allegiance

  • Is it always either

  • Me or you or neither

  • If I show you where I'm coming from, will you take a breather?

  • Cos what you'll find -- what you'll find

  • What you'll find guarantee will blow your mind!

  • I'll blow your mind -- I'll blow your mind

  • And then you'll see the reason I stay on my grind

  • Would you clap!

  • Can't have enough of it

  • It's our only way of life

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • Can't have enough of it

  • It's our only way of life

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • Keeping, keeping on the grind

  • The mandem make some noise

  • (Cheering)

  • (Applause)

  • This next one is partly in Kiswahili,

  • which is what we speak in Kenya.

  • And it's about female friendship

  • and female power.

  • And girls coming together to build something that lasts,

  • a true legacy and intergenerational worth.

  • "Suzie Noma."

  • (Drum music)

  • Sitting at the corner

  • Me and Suzie Noma

  • We ain't got no worries we are looking like the owners

  • Sipping on Coronas

  • Looking at the phone as

  • All them pretty boys come and tell us how they want us

  • Mambo ni kungoja, aki mtangoja

  • Sinaga matime za kuwaste na vioja

  • Planning how we want to take over the world soon

  • Riding on the drums and the clap while the bass goes

  • Hey! Shake it down shake it down like

  • Wait till you, wait till you see my

  • Hey! Shake it down shake it down like

  • Wait till you, wait till you see my

  • If you really know it and you really wanna show it

  • Be the way to go

  • Go and grab somebody, move your body, show somebody

  • Be the way to go

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • Iyo!

  • Scheming at the corner

  • Me and Suzie Noma

  • We ain't got no money but we do it how we wanna

  • Painting our nails checking our mails as

  • All them pretty boys wanna have us but they fail like

  • Aki mtangoja, leo mtangoja

  • Saa hii tukoworks hakunaga za vioja

  • Planning how we want to take over the world soon

  • Riding on the drums and the clap while the bass goes boom

  • Shake it down shake it down like

  • Wait till you, wait till you see my

  • Hey! Shake it down shake it down like

  • Wait till you, wait till you see my

  • If you really know it and you really wanna show it

  • Be the way to go

  • Go and grab somebody, move your body, show somebody

  • Be the way to go

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • And now you whine your waist

  • And now you screw your face

  • Exaggerate your waist

  • Resuscitate the place

  • Na wale wako fifty fifty comsi

  • Na wale wako fiti pia sisi

  • Tuko tu sawa mdogo mdogo yaani

  • Hallelu-yawa tumeiva design

  • If you really know it, and you really wanna show it

  • Be the way to go

  • Go and grab somebody, move your body, show somebody

  • Be the way to go

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • On this I know, all this I know, all this I know

  • Iyo!

  • (Cheering)

  • (Applause)

Between 2004 and 2008,

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B1 US TED kenyan kenya keeping grind radio

【TED】Muthoni Drummer Queen: Creativity builds nations (Creativity builds nations | Muthoni Drummer Queen)

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    林宜悉 posted on 2019/10/22
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