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  • This morning Google released the new trailer

  • from its Glass project.

  • Is augmented reality the next big step in our everyday lives?

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • Hey, I'm Anthony, and if you have not seen this new Glass

  • video, it's pretty awesome.

  • It's showing people getting live directions,

  • taking and sending photos and texts,

  • video-chatting, translating foreign languages

  • as they go through their daily routine.

  • Well, the Google employee version of a daily routine,

  • anyway-- which is, I guess, piloting vintage airplanes,

  • taking trapeze lessons, and snowboarding.

  • Thanks, stock options.

  • Google's Glass is really the first huge push

  • to get useful augmented reality into the hands of everyone,

  • starting with developers who can pre-order their unit now

  • for $1,500 and get it in 2014.

  • Now a lot of stuff in the trailer

  • might make it seem pretty silly.

  • For instance, I'm very rarely going to need to share the ice

  • sculpture I'm carving on Google+.

  • But I do love the bit where the guy

  • is walking through the airport and his gate and flight

  • information pop up automatically.

  • That sort of thing, that sort of instantaneous, effortless

  • access to important information, has been the main function

  • of augmented reality so far.

  • Soldiers have had head-mounted displays in the field

  • since 2005.

  • And jet fighter cockpits use heads-up displays.

  • Both of them overlay important target

  • and navigational information, allowing a pilot or a soldier

  • to make these split-second instinctive decisions

  • without hesitation.

  • Automobile manufacturers have already

  • showed off how that would work in a car,

  • highlighting important signs and lanes,

  • overlaying traffic information.

  • It's going to be hard to miss your exit if it's glowing

  • and there's a big arrow pointing to it, right?

  • Spatial environmental rooms, like the University

  • of Illinois at Chicago's Cave 2, use giant rooms

  • with 3-D glasses and control wands

  • to let people collaborate on medical research

  • or other complex projects.

  • They let people do things like walk through the human brain.

  • And now the general public is getting Google Glass.

  • But what happens when Google Glass, or something like it,

  • gets as powerful as Cave 2?

  • And hopefully much less noticeable.

  • Because let's be honest, Google Glass looks really silly.

  • I feel like my dad would wear it with a fanny pack or something.

  • Well, DARPA is currently working on augmented reality

  • contact lenses called Scenic-- tiny, full-color,

  • high-resolution displays right over your eye,

  • completely unnoticeable.

  • Now it'll be a long time before they trickle down to us.

  • But something from last week popped into my head

  • as I was thinking about all this.

  • The FDA just approved the Argus 2 bionic eye.

  • Now that's an artificial retina that

  • restores partial sight to the blind.

  • The Argus uses a visor that looks a lot like Google's Glass

  • to record the wearer's field of vision,

  • send the image to a belt-pack processor,

  • and then that processor turns the videos

  • into electrical signals that are wirelessly

  • transmitted to an implant in the person's eye tissue.

  • And right now, Argus sends black-and-white, low-resolution

  • images, but that's going to get better and better.

  • And as processing power improves,

  • that belt-pack might be replaced with, say, your phone.

  • And right now, the implant costs $100,000.

  • But as technology gets better, it's going to get cheaper.

  • So what happens when augmented reality just lives in our eyes?

  • I think it's going to be amazing,

  • but this stuff can be a little frightening.

  • For instance, I cannot even remember my friends' phone

  • numbers anymore because of smartphones.

  • So what happens when I offboard my whole life to the internet?

  • How conscientious are people really going

  • to be when everything they need to know is spoon-fed to them

  • at every moment?

  • And what happens when someone hacks into what you see,

  • or the implant just fails?

  • It'll be interesting to see how much this catches on

  • over the next few years and how dependent we actually

  • become on it.

  • Are you guys into it?

  • Are you thinking about that $1,500 pre-order?

  • Let me know down below, and subscribe for more DNews.

This morning Google released the new trailer

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Google Glass and Augmented Reality's Future

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    尤弘志 posted on 2013/11/15
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