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  • COMM: Nine year old Trinny Amuhirwe is no

  • different from other girls her age. Except an aggressive bone tumor is threatening to

  • take over her entire face.

  • SARAH: The tumor started when she was one

  • and a half, it was just a small thing but it started growing big.

  • COMM: The two kilogram tumor is so big that

  • it has blinded Trinny in one eye and made eating almost impossible. If left untreated

  • it would have dire consequences for Trinny's future.

  • SARAH: It was feeling like she was going to

  • die.

  • COMM: Trinny was discovered living in Kampala,

  • Uganda by UK charity, Facing The World.

  • GRAHAM: We were contacted in August, mid-August,

  • by a nurse, an American nurse working in Kampala, who'd come across Trinny. She basically sent

  • us a couple of photos and said that she'd met this girl, was there anything that we

  • thought we could do for her? Trinny has a condition which is called Fibrous Dysplasia,

  • it's where normal bone tissue is basically replaced by fibrous bone tissue which just

  • keeps growing so it destroys the good bone. The scale of it can vary and Trinny's is a

  • very severe case.

  • GRAHAM: I was quite shocked to see Trinny's

  • condition, it's not something you see everyday.

  • GRAHAM: The place where it's growing on her

  • skull will impact her ability to breathe and to eat, that's why we had to bring her over

  • so quickly for surgery.

  • COMM: Trinny was flown to the UK by the charity,

  • in the hope that surgeons would be able to remove the tumor.

  • NIALL: You can see quick clearly the extent

  • of this benign tumor which is growing forwards in the face and distorting the bone of the

  • cheek, the upper jaw and actually also between the eyes. These are rare tumors. They're not

  • cancer tumors that are going to kill you in any way, but they're benign tumors, but they

  • have devastating consequences and to see cases that are as extensive as this are extremely

  • rare.

  • JONATHAN: If left untreated, Trinny would

  • face a very bleak future really. There is no doubt the disease will continue to expand.

  • COMM: London is a long way from her home in

  • Uganda, and like any other nine year old, Trinny was exited to be in a new city.

  • GRAHAM: I originally thought, as often with

  • the case of our patients, is that they are very shy, very downcast, so I wasn't expecting

  • the little bundle of energy that she was when she arrived, because you realize that Trinny

  • is just the same as any other little girl, and beyond her condition, she is in to the

  • exact same things as other girls are in to.

  • COMM: As the day of her operation arrived,

  • some of the UK's leading surgeons, who work with the charity, were waiting to operate

  • on Trinny.

  • JONATHAN: Trinny's care involves an enormous

  • number of people. We've got anecdotists, surgeons, theatre staff, computer planners, pediatricians

  • and they are all giving their time for free, mainly to make Trinny's operation as successful

  • as possible.

  • GRAHAM: It's a massive operation. It's gonna

  • take a minimum of about fifteen hours. The operation that Trinny will be having is a

  • very risky operation and with that there's very real dangers that she might not survive.

  • SARAH: Trinny has a hope that one time, one

  • day, that thing will come off. That's the hope she has. That's what she's waiting for.

  • I'm also waiting for to see how she'll look like.

  • COMM: As the surgeons started work to remove

  • the tumor and reconstruct Trinny's face, they were all acutely aware of the dangers they

  • faced operating on someone with a condition as severe as Trinny's.

  • NIALL: There are a number of things that could

  • go wrong, and death is one of the complications.

  • COMM: And now, after recovering from a successful

  • surgery, Trinny has her childhood back. No longer held back by the tumor, she's able

  • to be the boisterous cheeky girl she previously was, and she's able to fulfill a wish to see

  • the sea for the first time.

  • TRAIN: This service will be fast to Brighton.

  • TRINNY: Yes!

  • LUCY: It's been wonderful getting to know

  • Trinny and Sarah. I first met them back in November when they arrived. From a personal

  • point of view, I'm delighted actually. She is the most wonderful child and everything

  • she encounters delights her. She gets very excited about all sorts of things - seeing

  • the sea for the first time, being on the pier and playing on the games. She just takes it

  • all in. She's wonderful. And that makes me happy.

  • SARAH: When I look at her now, I feel very

  • happy.

  • COMM: And now Trinny is ready to fly home

  • with mum, Sarah.

  • TRINNY: After my operation, I feel good. I

  • can eat well. When I go home I'm looking forward to going to school.

  • SARAH: I'm very thankful for the doctors for

  • the great work that they did. I think now Trinny will have a future, which she wouldn't

  • have had before.

  • GRAHAM: We see lots of patients every year

  • at Facing The World, but Trinny is really one of those ones that's really quite special.

  • I really hope that her surgery gives her the opportunity to carry on with her education,

  • and basically have options to do whatever she wants to do.

COMM: Nine year old Trinny Amuhirwe is no

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B1 comm tumor sarah graham operation bone

Unbelievable Face Tumour Girl

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    阿多賓 posted on 2013/11/12
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