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  • Hi, I'm Marie.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn useful language for going shopping in English.

  • You'll see how to ask for things you want, how to talk about prices and discounts, how

  • to arrange delivery, and how to take something back to a shop.

  • Before we start, don't forget to visit our website: Oxford Online English dot com.

  • Do you need to improve your English?

  • We have lots of resources for you: free video lessons, quizzes, free listening lessons,

  • and more!

  • We also have many professional teachers who offer online classes; you can improve your

  • spoken English, learn about English grammar, or prepare for IELTS with one of our teachers.

  • But now, let's see how you can use English when you go shopping.

  • Hello, do you need any help?

  • Yes, I've found this blue jacket, but I can only find L and XL sizes.

  • Do you have it in a medium?

  • I'm afraid we're sold out, but we do have the same style in brown.

  • It's just over here.

  • Ah

  • Yes, that's nice, too, but I really like the blue.

  • Will you be getting any more in?

  • Unfortunately not.

  • It's the end of the season, so we're getting some new styles in from next week.

  • The ones you see here are the last we have in stock.

  • If you want, you could check our website; it might be possible to order it online.

  • Thanks, but I need something for a party this weekend, plus I don't like to buy clothes

  • without trying them on first.

  • Sure, I understand.

  • Would you like to try the brown one on?

  • Yes, sure.

  • Where do I go?

  • The changing rooms are just over there.

  • In the dialogue, you heard some useful language related to buying clothing.

  • If you can't find what you need in a shop, what could you say?

  • In the dialogue, you heard, 'Do you have it in a medium?'

  • You could use this question in other ways.

  • For example: 'Do you have this in a small?'

  • 'Do you have this top in green?'

  • You could also use 'I'm looking for…' to say what you want.

  • For example: 'I'm looking for a formal dress to wear to a wedding.'

  • Or: 'I'm looking for some running shoes.'

  • Next, look at three phrases from the dialogue.

  • Could you explain what they mean?

  • 'Sold out' means that they've sold everything, so this product isn't available any more.

  • For example, if you say that 'Tickets for the concert have sold out', you mean that

  • all the tickets have been sold, and you can't buy tickets now.

  • 'Get in' is a phrasal verb which can mean 'have a product delivered'.

  • It's generally used to talk about shops and products which they sell.

  • For example, a shop assistant might say, 'We're getting more sizes in next Monday.'

  • That means that new products will be delivered next Monday, and you'll be able to find

  • a wider range of sizes.

  • 'In stock' means available, so you can buy the thing.

  • The opposite is 'out of stock'.

  • If a shop assistant says 'We're out of stock at the moment', he or she is telling

  • you that the product isn't available.

  • Next, let's see how you can talk about prices, deals and discounts when shopping.

  • Excuse me?

  • Yes?

  • I'm interested in buying these chairs, but I can't see a price tag.

  • Can you tell me how much they are?

  • Sure, let me check

  • ] Forty-nine ninety-nine each, or one hundred and eighty-five ninety-nine for the set of

  • four.

  • That seems strange.

  • I saw an advertisement that said they're buy one get one free.

  • Ah!

  • That's a different product.

  • I know the ones you mean; they're just over here.

  • Right!

  • That's what I was looking for.

  • So, how much are these?

  • One is seventy-nine ninety-nine, or two nine nine ninety-nine for a set of four.

  • Of course, with the buy one get one offer, you can buy two for seventy-nine ninety-nine,

  • or four forwhat would that be?

  • One sixty.

  • Perfect!

  • I'll take the set of four.

  • What do I do?

  • Is there a catalogue number?

  • Yes, just write down the number which is here, or take a picture with your phone.

  • Pay at the cash register, then go to the collection point to get your products.

  • I almost forgot: I have a loyalty card.

  • Does that mean I get a 5% discount?

  • Normally, yes, but your loyalty discount can't be used with other offers like this.

  • Yeah, that's what I thought.

  • Anyway, thanks for your help!

  • If you want to know how much something costs, you can ask a simple question: 'How much

  • is…?' or 'How much are…?'

  • For example: 'How much are these shoes?'

  • 'How much is this tablet?'

  • You could also ask in a slightly more formal way, as in: 'Can you tell me how muchare?'

  • or 'Can you tell me how muchis?'

  • For example: 'Can you tell me how much these trousers are?'

  • 'Can you tell me how much this electric toothbrush is?'

  • In spoken English, people sometimes don't read full numbers, especially numbers between

  • one hundred and one thousand.

  • Instead, they break the number into parts.

  • So, instead of 'four hundred (and) forty-nine', you might hear 'four-four-nine'.

  • This doesn't happen all the time, but it's not unusual, either.

  • For numbers above one thousand, the number is often broken into two parts.

  • So, instead of 'one thousand two hundred (and) seventy-five', you might hear 'twelve

  • seventy-five', or even 'twelve seven five'.

  • In the dialogue, the shop assistant said that a set of four chairs would cost two nine nine

  • ninety-nine.

  • Two nine nine ninety-nine.

  • What does this mean?

  • Can you write down the number?

  • Let's do some more practice with this quickly.

  • You're going to hear five prices, which might use the conversational style you just

  • saw.

  • After you hear each price, pause the video and write down the number.

  • You'll see the answers at the end.

  • Ready?

  • Let's start!

  • Three-two-five fifty.

  • Fifteen sixty-nine.

  • Ten ninety-nine.

  • Eight eight eight thirty.

  • Two four nine nine.

  • How was that?

  • Difficult?

  • If so, don't worry!

  • Rewind the video and listen once more.

  • You'll see the answers in a second.

  • How did you do?

  • Could you hear the prices correctly?

  • Understanding numbers, especially when people read the numbers in this conversational way,

  • can really help you when you're shopping in an English-speaking country.

  • Next, let's look at another common task when you're shopping: arranging delivery.

  • Yes, can I help?

  • Well

  • I've just bought this TV

  • Yes?

  • And

  • It's much bigger than I expected.

  • I'm not sure it'll fit in my car.

  • Do you offer a delivery service?

  • Yes, of course!

  • I'm surprised they didn't mention it to you when you paid.

  • That's great!

  • So, what do I do?

  • Can I take your receipt, please?

  • Of course; here you are.

  • Let me see

  • The earliest we could deliver it would be next Wednesday.

  • Does that work for you?

  • I'm at work during the week.

  • Do you deliver at weekends?

  • We can deliver on Saturdays, but there's a four-pound charge.

  • That's fine.

  • So, next Saturday, the 29th?

  • That works, but what time will it be?

  • We deliver between ten AM and four PM.

  • You can't give me a more specific time than that?

  • I'm afraid not.

  • All of our delivery slots are six hours.

  • I guess I'll have to take it, then.

  • OK, so you just need to pay the weekend delivery charge, and then we can set everything up

  • for you.

  • Can I pay by card?

  • Of course.

  • Of course, it's more common nowadays to order things online and have them delivered

  • to your home.

  • But maybe you want to see your new TV screen in action, try out your new sofa, or check

  • that your new table will match your living room.

  • In this case, you might need to arrange a delivery in the shop.

  • To do this, you could ask: 'Can I have this delivered?'

  • 'Do you offer a delivery service?'

  • 'Can you deliver this to my house?'

  • Quick quiz: you heard one of these three questions in the dialogue.

  • Which one?

  • You heard the second one.

  • However, they all have the same meaning.

  • You can use any of them!

  • You might also need to ask more specific questions about the delivery, like: 'Do you deliver