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  • Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Do you want to be polite?

  • Let's talk about it.

  • Everyone wants to be polite, right?

  • Well, most people.

  • Sometimes you have a small favor to ask someone.

  • "Could you open the door?

  • My hands are full."

  • Or maybe you have a big favor to ask someone.

  • "By any chance, could you feed my cats over the weekend while I'm gone?"

  • You need to use the correct polite expressions for each of these situations to continue having

  • good relationships with people around you.

  • Today, we're going to focus on the top 10 polite expressions that you can use in daily

  • life.

  • I use these all the time, and so can you.

  • I'm from the U.S., and when I studied abroad in the UK, I found this funny survival guide

  • to how to live in the UK, and this was one of the images in that survival guide.

  • On one side you can see the man is drowning and he says, "Help!" and it says "This is

  • wrong.

  • You shouldn't say this," and on the other side it says, "Excuse me, sir.

  • I'm terribly sorry to bother you, but I wonder if you would mind helping me for a moment,

  • as long as it's no trouble, of course."

  • Do you think this is realistic?

  • Of course not.

  • This is an exaggeration of British culture.

  • It's not true in the UK, it's not true in the U.S., but it is nice to include some polite

  • expressions, not when you're drowning, you can say, "Help, help, help!" of course, but

  • in daily life it's great to use a few polite expressions.

  • Let's talk about them.

  • The first seven polite phrases are great for asking a favor.

  • A favor is when you're asking someone to do something for you.

  • The first one is using could or would.

  • They are both exactly the same.

  • Could you do me a favor?

  • Would you help me?

  • Would you please tell me where the closest subway station is?

  • Can you use can in these situations?

  • Maybe if you're with some close friends and you're asking them to do something simple

  • like, "Can you pass me that paper?"

  • "Can you look at the GPS while I drive?"

  • That's fine.

  • But if you want to take it up to the next level, you could say could or would.

  • That was a pretty basic expression, so let's go on to some more advanced ones.

  • Expression number two is "If you don't mind, would you help put the dishes in the dishwasher?"

  • "If you don't mind, would you" something.

  • "If you don't mind" means if it doesn't bother you, but make sure that you don't say, "If

  • you don't care, would you put the dishes in the dishwasher?"

  • The word care is a little too strong and can seem kind of rude, so make sure you say, "If

  • you don't mind, would you help put the dishes in the dishwasher?"

  • I have a good friend that often comes over to dinner at our house, and after dinner,

  • Dan and I are busy putting Theo, our toddler, to bed.

  • The process, bath and reading books and all of this, takes about 30 minutes.

  • And because she's my good friend, I don't asking her, "If you don't mind, would you

  • help put the dishes away in the dishwasher while we're putting Theo to bed?"

  • This is a great thing to ask.

  • Expression number three, "If it's not a problem, could I, or can I, call you back in 10 minutes?"

  • Dan and I just moved into a new house, and on our moving day, as we were moving things

  • into the house, our realtor called.

  • A realtor is someone who helps you to buy a house.

  • She said it wasn't an emergency, and things were kind of hectic because we were moving

  • lots of boxes in, so I used this expression, "If it's not a problem, could I call you back

  • in 10 minutes?"

  • You can also use can here.

  • "If it's not a problem, can I call you back in 10 minutes?"

  • Beautiful.

  • Expression number four, "When you have a moment, can you, could you email me those documents?"

  • or "When you get a second, can you email me those documents, could you email me those

  • documents?"

  • I have a tax accountant who helps me to process my taxes, and this is a sentence that I used

  • in an email with him.

  • "When you have a moment, can you email me those documents?"

  • He's a pretty chill, relaxed guy, and so happy.

  • I don't know how anyone who does taxes can be so happy, but he always is, and I asked

  • him, "When you have a moment, can you email me those documents?"

  • You can also use the word get here.

  • Get is more common in spoken English.

  • You can use have or get in spoken English, but we don't often write the word get.

  • "When you get a second, can you email me those documents, could you email me those documents?"

  • It's more common to use get in spoken English.

  • Expression number five, "If you get a chance, could you water our plants too?"

  • When Dan and I are gone for a couple days, we ask our neighbor to watch our cats, and

  • this is an expression that I often use if I forget to ask the neighbor to do something.

  • "If you get a chance, could you water our plants too?"

  • This means that it is not necessary, "if you get a chance," because they might not get

  • a chance, or they probably will, but it's just saying it's not necessary.

  • Feeding our cats is necessary.

  • They have to do that.

  • But watering the plants is not necessary for a few days, so you can use this.

  • "If you get a chance, could you water our plants?"

  • Make sure when you use this expression that it's for something that is not necessary,

  • because they might not do it, or you can just use it to say, "Hey, I know I'm asking you

  • something extra.

  • It's not necessary, but if you get a chance, could you do this?"

  • If you have a necessary task that you want to ask someone, just change one word.

  • Say, "When you get a chance, could you check our mail, when you get a chance?"

  • If you're gone for a week, it's necessary to take the mail from your mailbox and put

  • it in your house.

  • It's necessary for the mailman.

  • It's necessary for you.

  • So you could just say "when you get a chance."

  • You're not saying do it now.

  • You're just saying, "When you get a chance, could you put my mail on the table?

  • I'm sorry, I forgot to ask you."

  • This is really polite, and it shows that it needs to be done when you get a chance.

  • It's not if you get a chance, but when you get a chance, could you do this?

  • Super polite.

  • Expression number six, "By any chance, could you give me a ride home from work today?"

  • This is really polite.

  • I use this one a lot.

  • In fact, maybe if your car is in the shop, in the shop means at the mechanic, if your

  • car is in the shop and you don't have a ride home, you might approach your coworker and

  • say, "By any chance, could you give me a ride home from work today?"

  • It's usually for a big task or something that you know will be something important or big

  • for the other person to do, so you can use this to say, "Oh, by any chance, could you

  • give me a ride home from work today?"

  • Sentence number seven, "I'd appreciate it if you would have the report done by this

  • afternoon."

  • Be careful with this one.

  • You can only use this if you are the boss, if you are the teacher.

  • Do not use this with someone who is your equal.

  • Do not say this to your husband, your wife, your coworker.

  • "I'd appreciate it if you would finish that report by this afternoon."

  • You could only use this if you're in a position of authority.

  • This word, appreciate, is different than "I appreciate it.

  • Thank you."

  • We can use that to just say, simply, thank you.

  • "Oh, you bought me some flowers.

  • I appreciate it."

  • But when you say, "I'd appreciate it," this means I would appreciate it if you'd finish

  • that report.

  • This is showing that you need them to do something, and you're kind of politely commanding them

  • to do something.

  • So if you are the boss, this is a polite expression you can use to tell someone, "Hey, I need

  • you to do this, I need you to do this by this afternoon, but I want to tell it to you in

  • a polite way."

  • "I'd appreciate it if you'd have that report done by this afternoon."

  • Good.

  • Make sure you use a polite tone of voice.

  • The next three phrases are for giving suggestions.

  • Number eight, "What if we reschedule for another day because it's raining today?"

  • My father-in-law is an engineer, and he often has clients and customers and people from

  • other departments visiting from Japan, China, France, Germany, and when they come to his

  • office, they often take those people out to play golf.

  • I've never worked in a company like this, so I haven't experienced this, but he said

  • it's pretty common for his company.

  • So if it's raining that day that they plan to play golf, he might say this.

  • "What if we reschedule for another day because it's raining today?"

  • He's giving a suggestion, but it's also pretty direct in a polite way.

  • Number nine, "How about if we go out to eat instead?"

  • Let's imagine that you're the one who's visiting my father-in-law's company, and it's raining.

  • You plan to play golf, but you can't because it's raining.

  • He might say to you, "How about if we go out to eat instead?"

  • He's presenting another alternative.

  • He's suggesting something else.

  • The other day, Dan asked me what I wanted to do in the afternoon, and I said, "Well,

  • we could go to the park, but we always go to the park.

  • How about if we go to the creek and we splash around in the water, because Theo loves to

  • do that and it's the perfect summer activity?"

  • I was suggesting something.

  • "How about if we go to the creek and play in the water?"

  • Even though Dan is my husband, we're not in a business relationship...

  • Well, he does help me with these English lessons, but we're not technically in an office in

  • this kind of relationship.

  • So I could use this in a personal way as well.

  • It doesn't have to be just in a business situation.

  • "How about if we go to the creek?"

  • I'm just presenting, suggesting something else.

  • Polite expression number 10, "What do you think about this place?"

  • This is a little bit more indirect because you're asking what someone thinks.

  • You're not directly suggesting something else.

  • So let's take a look at some of those scenarios that we just talked about, using this expression,

  • so that you can see the difference.

  • "What do you think about rescheduling our golf game?"

  • "What do you think about eating out instead of going to play golf?"

  • "What do you think about playing in the creek?"

  • I'm asking, "What do you think about this?"

  • I'm not saying, "I want to do this," so it's pretty indirect, but it's another polite way

  • to give a suggestion.

  • I have two bonus miscellaneous polite expressions that I'd like to share with you.

  • This is number 11, bonus expression, "You should probably check the oven because I smell

  • something burning."

  • If you come to my house and you're about to eat dinner, but you smell something burning,

  • you might use this to politely say, "You should probably," probably here is our polite word,

  • "You should probably check the oven because I smell something burning."

  • Great way to ask someone to do something.

  • You're not saying, "Go do it now."

  • You're saying, "You should probably check the oven."

  • Great.

  • The next bonus expression, number 12, is "I don't want to keep you."

  • Do you need to get out of a conversation, or maybe you feel like the other person needs

  • to leave the conversation and they don't feel comfortable just saying goodbye?

  • This is a great way to say, "Okay, I understand that you need to go," or maybe you're telling

  • them, "Hey, I need to go."

  • You can say, "Well, I don't want to keep you, but it was great talking with you."

  • You're not saying, "I have to go."

  • Instead, you're just saying, "I don't want to keep you in this conversation."

  • You're trying to be polite about this.

  • "I don't want to keep you.

  • It was nice meeting you," or "I don't want to keep you, so I guess I'll see you the next

  • time."

  • It's a great expression to add when you're saying goodbye to someone politely.

  • That was a lot of polite expressions.

  • Let's review.

  • I want you to say these sentences out loud with me.

  • Try to practice pronouncing them, practice saying them out loud, so repeat them.

  • Are you ready?

  • Would you please tell me where the closest subway station is?

  • If you don't mind, would you help put the dishes in the dishwasher while I put the kids

  • to bed?

  • If it's not a problem, could I call you back in about 10 minutes?

  • When you have a moment, can you email me those documents?

  • If you get a chance, could you water the plants too?

  • By any chance, could you give me a ride home from work today?

  • I'd appreciate it if you would have the report finished by the end of the day.

  • What if we reschedule for another day because it's raining today?

  • How about if we go out to eat instead?

  • What do you think about this place?

  • You should probably check the oven because I smell something burning.

  • I don't want to keep you, but it was great talking.

  • That was a lot of wonderful polite expressions.

  • Well, I don't want to keep you, so I'm going to ask you a quick question.

  • In the comments, let me know which one of these polite expressions was new for you.

  • Can you use it?

  • Thanks so much for learning English with me, and I'll see you again next Friday for a new

  • lesson here on my YouTube channel.

  • Bye.

  • The next step is to download my free e-book, Five Steps to Becoming a Confident English

  • Speaker.

  • You'll learn what you need to do to speak confidently and fluently.

  • Don't forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel for more free lessons.

  • Thanks so much.

  • Bye.

Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

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A2 US polite expression chance email dishwasher raining

TOP 10 Polite English Expressions: Advanced Vocabulary Lesson

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    Courage posted on 2019/08/14
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