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  • (upbeat music)

  • - Hello everyone and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • Today we're going to be discussing the word goodbye

  • and why you need to stop using it.

  • Believe it or not, we hardly ever say goodbye.

  • It's something that just doesn't roll off the tongue

  • and it sounds quite formal.

  • You might see it written down or hear it in films,

  • but on a general day to day basis, you won't hear goodbye.

  • In this video,

  • I am going to give you loads of alternatives to goodbye.

  • I'm going to give you casual and slang ones

  • that you can use with friends and family,

  • and I'm also going to give you more formal ones,

  • more old-fashioned ones,

  • and ones that you can use in business situations.

  • I will also try to differentiate

  • between American and British English as I know

  • some of you find that really interesting and helpful.

  • So this video is perfect for improving your vocabulary,

  • but if you want to improve your listening

  • and pronunciation even further,

  • I highly recommend the special method

  • of combining reading actual books

  • with listening to audio books.

  • Let me explain this method.

  • Take a book that you have already read in English

  • or a book that you would like to read in English.

  • I've got loads of recommendations

  • in the description box down below,

  • and read that book

  • whilst listening to the audiobook version.

  • It sounds excessive, but it works.

  • Reading alone will not help you

  • with your pronunciation in English

  • because most frequently, how a word is written

  • does not correspond with how a word is pronounced.

  • Look at they're, there and their, for example,

  • they are all spelled differently,

  • but all pronounced in the same way.

  • Reading a book alone will not show you that.

  • However, if you then introduce an audio book,

  • you will start to learn these differences

  • and you will start to learn the pronunciation of words.

  • If you listen to a word, as you read it,

  • your brain will start to make the connections

  • and next time you see that word,

  • you'll know how to pronounce it,

  • and next time you hear that word,

  • you will know how to spell it.

  • It is such an effective method

  • and the best part is that you can get one free audiobook,

  • that's a 30-day free trial on Audible

  • if you click on the link in the description box and sign up,

  • then you can download one of my audio book recommendations.

  • Give it a try, it works.

  • Right, let's get started with the lesson.

  • I'm going to begin with casual ways of saying goodbye.

  • The first one I think most of you will know it is bye.

  • Bye on its own is really frequently used.

  • It's just so easy to say

  • and it's a word you can say with a smile.

  • Bye, bye.

  • Number two, and it's an extension of that

  • is bye-bye or buh-bye.

  • Now we use this in a different situation

  • to just bye on its own.

  • And it's important that you know this,

  • bye-bye is a little more cute

  • and little more childish and infantile.

  • It's something you'd likely say to a child, "bye-bye !"

  • However we do use it sometimes

  • if we're trying to be very cute or friendly,

  • bye-bye, see you.

  • That brings me onto my next one, which is see you later.

  • See you later, we often say see ya instead of see you.

  • See you later.

  • This is one that we say if we already have plans

  • to see someone again in that same day.

  • If we don't have plans, we can say number four

  • which is, see you soon.

  • If you want to be really casual, you can use number five

  • which is just see ya and that is very, very informal.

  • Now, number six is a little bit more advanced.

  • You will look really good

  • if you use this around a native speaker.

  • This one is, I'm heading off!

  • This is a good way to start to leave an event

  • that you do want to be at anymore.

  • To head off is a phrasal verb meaning to begin to leave,

  • to head off.

  • Saying, oh, I'm heading off, I'll see you soon,

  • is a great way to start the goodbye process

  • which we all know can be a little lengthy.

  • A shortened down version of that,

  • number seven, is just "I'm off". "Right, I'm off. See you."

  • That's very casual again.

  • Another one that we can use which is very British,

  • is I'm going to make a move or I've got to make a move.

  • To make a move is to leave.

  • I need to make a move.

  • In America, they're more likely to say,

  • I'm going to make tracks or I've got to make tracks

  • and that means to drive away.

  • "You're making tracks with your car."

  • All of these phrases are normally preceded with, ”right”.

  • You say "Right", as you're getting up, "Right, I'm off".

  • Right, I'm going to make tracks.

  • Another one, again, very British

  • is, oh, I've got to get going, I've got to get going.

  • Practise that one on your own a couple of times

  • because I've got to get going, I've got to get going

  • is quite a tongue twister, twister.

  • Oh! I can't believe the word tongue twister

  • was a tongue twister for me, that is hilarious.

  • (laughing)

  • Okay, number 11 is "I must be going".

  • "Oh, what's the time? I must be going.” "I must be off."

  • A very American one is I (I've) gotta take off,

  • I've gotta take off.

  • In British English, take off is really for clothes,

  • to take off your clothes and to take off as an aeroplane,

  • An aeroplane takes off”.

  • But in America that means to leave as well.

  • 14, very, very casual is "Have a good one",

  • and that means "have a good day".

  • But it's very warm and friendly. "Have a good one."

  • And the last one, number 15 is "talk to you later".

  • "Talk to you later."

  • It's a bit of an extension of, see you later.

  • "Talk to you later" implies that you might send a text

  • or make a phone call to them later that day.

  • Right, let's talk about formal professional and old-fashioned ways

  • of saying goodbye in English.

  • The first one is very American

  • and it's used in business or service situations.

  • It's, "Have a great day", "You have a great day".

  • And I was so surprised when I went to the USA

  • because everyone wanted me to have a great day.

  • And on the first couple of times

  • I'm just like, oh that's nice.

  • And then just when I realised that everyone said it,

  • I realised that no one really wanted me to have a great day.

  • The British version of this would be, "have a lovely day".

  • And that is slightly more sincere.

  • We don't use it as often so it sort of means more.

  • An alternative to this is "take care", or "you take care",

  • or "you take care now", and that's quite warm and friendly.

  • If you want to say goodbye to somebody

  • that's going on a journey or is driving away,

  • you can say "have a safe journey"

  • or "have a good journey", that's British,

  • and in American English, they're quite likely

  • to say, "drive safe" or "you drive safe now".

  • Number five, more formal, "it was nice to see you",

  • or "it was nice seeing you".

  • Either or, "nice to see" or "nice seeing".

  • If you've just met the person for the first time,

  • "it was nice to meet you", "it was lovely meeting you".

  • Nice and lovely are interchangeable, of course.

  • The next one, very, very posh.

  • This is very old-fashioned is "farewell".

  • You might see this one in books and movies set in the past.

  • We don't tend to use it now,

  • but I think it's important for you to understand it.

  • Another old-fashioned one is, "tara".

  • Now this is slang but it's very old-fashioned,

  • so I put it in this list.

  • Older people might say "tara"

  • to you, which means goodbye, obviously,

  • 'cause it's in this video.

  • And another one is "tata" or "tata for now".

  • And again, very old-fashioned and a little bit posher.

  • The last one.

  • if you want somebody to keep in contact with you,

  • you can say "stay in touch".

  • And that's a nice way of ending a conversation.

  • That's the end of this lesson, I hope you enjoyed it

  • and I hope you learned something, I really hope you did

  • because I gave you a lot of vocabulary there.

  • Don't forget to download your free audiobook.

  • The link is in the description box

  • along with my audiobook and book recommendations.

  • And don't forget to connect with me

  • on all of my social media.

  • I've got my Facebook, I've got my Instagram,

  • and I've got my Twitter.

  • And I shall see you soon for another lesson.

  • Audiobook that you have already read in any--

  • I have not thought of crazy frog in like five years.

  • Just, wow.

  • A long time ago, wasn't it?

  • Right, let's get started with the lesson.

  • I'm going to begin with casual phrases.

  • (laughing)

  • So casual, I can't even say the R.

  • (upbeat music)

(upbeat music)

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 US goodbye casual fashioned audiobook twister british

DO NOT SAY 'GOODBYE!' - We DON'T say this anymore! Say instead:

  • 536 26
    Sophie posted on 2019/08/05
Video vocabulary