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  • (slow music)

  • - Hi, I'm Rob Grimm with RGG EDU

  • and today we're sitting down with Michael Woloszynowicz,

  • which is the hardest name I've ever had to say.

  • - You nailed, no you

  • nailed it Rob. - Alright, that's good.

  • That's a difficult name.

  • - It's tough one.

  • - Anyway, we're just wrapping up three days

  • of shooting with Michael.

  • We've been working on his tutorial

  • and it's truly been a pleasure to watch.

  • I gotta tell you, working with you has been terrific.

  • You're setting a high bar for all other

  • instructors to come with our tutorials.

  • First of all, let's talk about your background.

  • - Sure. - I think that's one

  • of the things that people really like to know is,

  • how you got started.

  • Cause a lot of people are struggling

  • and wanting to get into the business.

  • So kind of walk us through your history of photography,

  • when you started, when it really clicked for you.

  • - Yeah.

  • So it was probably

  • I was maybe like 10 or 12

  • when I first picked up a camera.

  • Just shooting mostly landscapes.

  • I mean, you know just kinda going out with my dad

  • we were out in the Rockys you know, shooting stuff.

  • And so did that for about a year or two.

  • But every time I got the photos back--

  • - [Rob] This is back in the film days.

  • - This is back in the film days, yeah.

  • - [Rob] What kind of camera?

  • - It was an EOS 1, Canon EOS 1 actually, yeah.

  • So-- - Still have it somewhere?

  • - I do, it's actually still sitting at home.

  • Still works. - My first one

  • is sitting up there on the shelf.

  • - Nice.

  • - It's cool. - Yeah so I mean

  • I did that for about two years,

  • just you know kinda shooting some landscapes.

  • But every time I kinda send them off for development,

  • I got 'em back I just was kind of underwhelmed

  • with what I got and I don't know.

  • I just somehow never got into the dark room thing,

  • so just kind of gave it up I think after a while.

  • - [Rob] You never pursued the dark room?

  • - No.

  • - So you were sending off images--

  • - Yeah. - Being processed,

  • getting them back.

  • Were the results flat, just not interesting?

  • - Just, well I mean I think for me too it's...

  • I don't know, what I love about digital is that

  • kind of gives me some guidance as far as

  • like how I'm gonna build my vision around that photo.

  • Where as there, I don't know.

  • It was, I think and partially I wasn't really,

  • I didn't have enough understanding too about photography

  • to really you know, make sure to get

  • a great image out of camera.

  • So I don't think I really just dedicated myself

  • enough at that point.

  • It wasn't just, you know, the development.

  • - Right. - But you know

  • I was young and so it was something I enjoyed

  • tinkering with and then I decided you know what,

  • this maybe isn't for me.

  • But then many years later, I think it was

  • probably about three years ago,

  • I picked up my dad's Nikon D300--

  • - Okay. - And...

  • For no real reason actually.

  • I think I was just like browsing through.

  • He gave me like the 500PX app on his iPad.

  • - Is your dad a photographer?

  • Sounds like he's always had a camera.

  • - Yeah he's, I mean he's not like

  • a professional photographer or anything like that,

  • he's a structural engineer.

  • But he again, he enjoys the process of

  • you know, photography so--

  • - Mathematical mind. - Yeah.

  • - Photography is a very mathematical

  • business actually. - It is, yeah.

  • And I'm like my computer science background as well, right.

  • So again you know, a lot of math

  • and things like that. - Right.

  • - It's a very analytical.

  • But yeah, so you know picked that up

  • and I was just browsing through 500PX

  • and I was just amazed at like you know,

  • what you could do these days.

  • It kind of just never really dawned on me

  • on how great you know, the image are looking these days.

  • I was always thought that you know

  • digital, it's not gonna look that great.

  • So I started playing around with this camera.

  • Just you know, shooting some portraits

  • with like speed lights and just took it out

  • you know, streets of (mumbles)

  • always just shooting some stuff there.

  • And gradually I just noticed the images becoming

  • more and more interesting.

  • And then I realized essentially

  • that if I want them to look really great

  • I have to become good at Photoshop, so.

  • - The images became more interesting.

  • Is that because you started to see

  • that your eye was developing

  • and you were getting a better sense of composition

  • or-- - Yeah, I think so.

  • I think it was kind of lots of things all at once.

  • I think, you know, I started to understand

  • the possibilities with digital as well.

  • Before that, like it was just kind of

  • like point and shoot type stuff.

  • You know I had like a small Canon I was.

  • You know nonchalantly photograph things

  • while I was on vacation or whatever.

  • But never really gave it much thought right.

  • So. - Right.

  • - Once I started seeing these images,

  • I'm like wow, I'd really love to produce stuff like that.

  • So then I started getting more interested in it

  • and you know reading up on it

  • and actually just going out purely to shoot

  • for no other reason or traveling just to shoot and...

  • You know like I said, at the same time

  • I was developing my skills in Photoshop,

  • tryna see what I can do with these images.

  • How I can push them and you know how I can blend

  • multiple exposures together to create something

  • that's a little bit more interesting.

  • So I think my start was probably more in like architecture

  • and city scapes and stuff like that.

  • But somehow I really enjoyed lighting subjects.

  • I really enjoyed kind of playing around with lighting

  • and seeing you know what it can do.

  • So again, I had really basic gear at that time.

  • It was like you know a speed light

  • and a little lastolite box.

  • So the results weren't great,

  • but I could just kind of see things

  • getting gradually better and better.

  • And that just kind of kicked things off for me.

  • - It sounds like Photoshop was almost hand in hand,

  • if not slightly in the lead,

  • for you in the development of your

  • photography skills. - Yeah.

  • - Like you started to get some nice results

  • but then needed to push them in Photoshop.

  • - Right, yeah I think it was.

  • I mean it really, part of the reason why

  • I was photographing too was to have something

  • that I can edit off of, right.

  • So the two are kind of pushing each other a little bit.

  • But I think, I really enjoyed the process

  • of retouching images.

  • I mean...

  • You know again, I never really gave Photoshop much thought.

  • I kind of opened it up a couple times,

  • seemed way too complicated.

  • And I'm just like forget this you know.

  • So I just I left it alone

  • but I finally realized you know

  • I gotta get good at this.

  • So I was just again, watching--

  • - [Rob] So how did you get good?

  • - You know just kind of watching

  • the odd thing on the internet.

  • Just kind of tryna piece together

  • what's going on in there and then a lot of it