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  • What does Brexit mean? It's a very difficult version, I think it changes daily.

  • And as someone has been following it quite closely, I don't know.

  • There's all like these technical big words, I have actually no idea what they mean.

  • I mean, I don't know what's going to happen, and I don't think anybody does to be quite honest.

  • Hopefully it'll work out in the end.

  • Everything is explained through economic terms.

  • Our GDP will fall by this much; our growth will fall by this much...

  • You know, no one knows what that means for them.

  • I think the first time I heard about Brexit I was 15, so obviously way below the voting age.

  • I didn't really know what it meant, and honestly I didn't really know what the EU was at the time either.

  • I just remember just Googling it because that's how we find our best information right? Just Googling things.

  • Whether it's no deal, the prime minister's deal, whatever.

  • I think that it's a golden opportunity for Britain to take.

  • And you'd be foolish not to be celebrating it.

  • No, I'm not worried about Brexit.

  • We'll have to buy more British food because other food will be more expensive, which is better for our country.

  • We just need to get on with it!

  • I just feel like the whole situation is just limiting me as a person, like what I can do.

  • And like where I can go.

  • If I look at all the MPs, I don't feel like I can identify with even one of them.

  • They just want, like, British people who represent them, but they wouldn't want us to be represented.

  • I know a lot of people who are scared and I'm certainly scared myself.

  • I would like us to stay in the EU. I would.

  • The reason you don't hear much from younger leave voters is not necessarily because they don't exist.

  • It's because, especially on campus, there's a bit of a social stigma around it.

  • I mean, the 'B' word gets mentioned, you say that you've supported leave.

  • And then suddenly next thing you know, your entire university hall is up in arms against you.

  • But no, I think that there's a stereotype that if you voted Brexit, you must be racially motivated; you must be inward-looking.

  • Whereas I'd say that I'm probably a prime example of how that's not true.

  • I mean I'm a Czech, I'm an internationally minded individual.

  • And that's just something that we've got to deal with.

  • I mean, there's a stigma.

  • But it's not good enough for leave supporters to just sit there and complain about it.

  • We actually have to just be relentless and get our voices heard.

  • We've mostly got to prove them wrong, to be honest.

  • I'm Indian by heritage but my family has come from Kenya and Madagascar.

  • Much of my family came to work and to help the infrastructure of the UK.

  • But you also see them saying: "The migrants are coming from Europe, they're not going to do anything, they're stealing our benefits."

  • And it's like, well I know times have changed but have people's views really changed that much to think that they have now forgotten what it was like for them?

  • Brexit's not only uncovered this whole load of economic distrust, but also this whole lack of empathy towards other people.

  • It's very sad, not a nice thought.

  • My house was pretty split on Brexit.

  • It might seem like a massive monumental change to people in businesses or writing in papers about.

  • You know, how it will affect our GDP or whatever.

  • But actually, when you're a van driver like my dad, it's just:

  • "How will this affect my everyday?"

  • So, he voted leave because to him, I think it meant something that they should sit down and listen to us for once.

  • I don't think Brexit voters made a mistake at all.

  • I just think that the political elite threw out so much misinformation.

  • Our politicians have just thought: "Oh we'll just say that and hope they believe it."

  • Well actually that's just not acceptable because that's not what democracy is about like, democracy literally means people power.

  • Not people blindly following what politicians tell them because there's literally no other option.

  • Like you listen to them or you don't.

  • How can anyone possibly make up their mind on this when the narrative was so driven by frankly just awful politics?

  • Now, two and a half years on, we know what Brexit looks like.

  • At the time, we were sold something completely different.

  • And I think now that we know what it looks like, we need to put it back to the people and see if that's what they actually want.

  • I do think that that is the only way out of this mess that we've managed to get ourselves in.

  • In an ideal world I would like, remain to be on the ballot and Theresa May's deal.

  • Because we know what both of those options look like.

  • We're very far away from the Westminster bubble.

  • And people are already feeling like they're not being listened to.

  • So, we have to be careful.

  • If we did have a people's vote and the people voted for May's deal, then that's what would happen.

  • Because that's what the people want.

  • No, obviously that's not what I would like.

  • Young people just aren't represented not only because we're not given the vote, but because we're more diverse than we were, like, 30 years ago.

  • But yet politicians now, if you look at them, they're just not very representative of what's currently happening in the UK, like right now.

  • Like there's quite a lot of them that have gone to the same colleges, private colleges, Eton.

  • It's very repetitive and it's like, when is change going to happen?

  • Even if you look at this friendship group, we're all from different backgrounds, ethnicities, cultures.

  • We're quite privileged in that, really.

  • I just don't think it's as diverse as it should be.

  • Like, politics is a big scary place and people are deliberately shut out.

  • It's meant to seem like something that only old people care about because then that's how people win elections.

  • Because then only older people go out and vote.

  • In parliament it's just so like "Ooh, yeah", and everyone's yelling at each other and going "Ahh".

  • And that's all so childish and pathetic.

  • But actually the things that are happening there really affect us.

  • As a young person, I do try to keep myself excited for what's going to happen in the future.

  • At the moment, it's really hard to see anywhere past the next month.

  • I definitely am worried about the future, yeah.

  • I don't really want to think about it.

  • No, I don't understand what Brexit means.

  • Like, they're all sat around parliament talking about what's going to change or what's not going to change...

  • No, I don't know.

  • It's all a bit confusing, isn't it?

  • Instead of, you know, looking into the future like, yeah, I want to be successful and I want to aim for the highest for myself.

  • You have to think, well, you're most likely going to be limited by your own government, basically.

  • There is still change to be had, change we made and now we are seeing that.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for example.

  • Figureheads like that who are sort of like, spearheading the idea that young people can make change.

  • And that we don't necessarily have to accept what we have at the moment which clearly isn't working, as we've seen from Brexit.

  • I'd say, the political climate at the moment, makes me disappointed, nervous, but still hopeful that there is still some way of getting through this.

  • It's really down to the individual to go out and be heard.

  • We are in a generation where we are all saying that we can go and change the world.

  • So go and do it, nothing is stopping you.

  • I think Brexit for me, it just screams a mess.

  • And it's something that I don't think I'll quite understand how it's going to affect me for at least, you know, another few years.

  • I think we are still in the process of finding out what it really means for the country.

What does Brexit mean? It's a very difficult version, I think it changes daily.

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A2 UK brexit people affect voted deal stigma

Brexit teens: coming of age during political chaos

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    Jessieeee posted on 2019/05/23
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