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  • It's AumSum Time

  • Hi guys.

  • Can you guess the title of my next video?

  • Oh no.

  • I'm gonna die.

  • Just kidding.

  • Hurry up.

  • Write your guess in the comments section below.

  • My horse fainted.

  • Somebody help.

  • Just kidding.

  • Horses can sleep lying down, but being massive in size.

  • They wouldn't be able to get up and run from predators.

  • Also, lying down for long restricts blood circulation putting pressure on their organs.

  • Hence, through evolution,

  • They developed a mechanism called stay apparatus.

  • In which they lock the ligaments.

  • Tendons of their legs to avoid falling.

  • Thus helping them take small naps while standing.

  • What causes tides?

  • Tides are the periodic rise and fall of sea level at a particular place.

  • When the sea level rises to its greatest height.

  • It is known as a high tide and when the sea level drops to its lowest height, it is known as a low tide.

  • Tides are primarily caused due to the gravitational force of the moon.

  • But how Part of the earth facing the moon experiences.

  • A stronger gravitational pull towards the moon as compared to the earth's center.

  • So, the part facing the moon is pulled away from the center, creating a bulge.

  • Thus, increasing the sea level and causing a high tide.

  • Now, the earth's center experiences a stronger gravitational force towards the moon.

  • Than the part facing away from the moon.

  • Hence, this part is pulled away from the center, resulting in high tide on the opposite side as well.

  • In addition to this, the places in between the two high tides, where the sea level drops, experience low tides.

  • Topic: Blushing.

  • Why do we blush?

  • I don't know.

  • When we are embarrassed, ashamed or shy, we blush.

  • Blushing is governed by our sympathetic nervous system.

  • Its functioning is not under our control.

  • What?

  • I cannot control my own sympathetic nervous system?

  • Absolutely.

  • Now, when we are ashamed or shy, it causes us immediate stress.

  • When something causes immediate stress, our sympathetic nervous system considers it as a threat.

  • To defend the threat, this system orders our adrenal glands to release a hormone called adrenaline.

  • Adrenaline speeds up our breathing rate.

  • It expands the blood vessels so that more blood and oxygen can be reached to our body parts.

  • Thus preparing our body for fight or flight.

  • Now, as the blood vessels on our face are very close to our skin surface.

  • They make our face appear red, that is, we blush.

  • Topic: Thermoregulation.

  • Why do we sweat?

  • It is a natural way of our body to take a bath.

  • No.

  • Sweating helps in thermoregulation.

  • Thermoregulation is the process by which organisms maintain their internal body temperature.

  • Now, the internal body temperature of a human is about 37 degrees Celsius or 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Our enzymes and hormones work best at this temperature.

  • Hence, thermoregulation is very important for us.

  • Well.

  • If you ask my opinion, chocolate syrup is very important for me.

  • Just listen.

  • On a sunny day or during exercise, when our body temperature increases.

  • Our sweat glands produce sweat.

  • This sweat is about 99% water.

  • Water is a very good heat absorbent.

  • It absorbs much of our body heat and evaporates into the atmosphere, helping us lose heat.

  • Thus maintaining our body temperature.

  • Why do snakes shed their skin?

  • Wait, I'll explain.

  • When a snake grows, its outer skin layer called epidermis does not grow or get bigger with it.

  • Hence, the snake sheds its epidermis periodically to allow further growth of its body.

  • In addition to this, shedding also helps remove parasites present on the epidermis.

  • So, does the snake buy a new skin?

  • No.

  • First listen.

  • Before shedding, the snake grows a new epidermis beneath the old one.

  • Secretes a fluid between the old and new epidermis.

  • This fluid helps separate the old epidermis from the new one.

  • Once this is done, the process of shedding begins.

  • To remove the old epidermis, the snake rubs its head against any hard surface.

  • Creating a tear either near mouth or near nose area.

  • Then, it drags and wriggles it body against any hard surface and slowly slithers out of the old epidermis.

It's AumSum Time

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B2 US epidermis sea level body snake moon tide

How do Horses Sleep? | #aumsum

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    AumSum posted on 2019/04/08
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