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  • Telephone Ringing

  • Telephone Ringing

  • Telephone Ringing

  • Hi! This is the cardiovascular system.

  • I have a question for you. Go ahead.

  • What is the cardiovascular system?

  • The cardiovascular system

  • includes the heart and the blood vessels. the heart pumps blood

  • and the blood vessels deliver it throughout the body.

  • At the center of the cardiovascular system

  • is the heart.

  • It is a muscle about the size of your fist.

  • It is located behind your ribcage

  • and a little to the left of the middle of the chest. The ribs protect your heart

  • that is why whenever you fall down or get hit

  • in the chest your heart is safe your. Heart pumps the blood through the body

  • through arteries and veins. These

  • are like little roads your body. The body

  • carries a good nice oxygen and nutrients that the body needs

  • and carries away the rotten dirty carbon dioxide

  • and chemical waste, so that the body can get rid of them.

  • Telephone Ringing

  • Telephone Ringing

  • Telephone Ringing

  • You've reached the heart.

  • Yeah Mr. Heart can you please tell me more about yourself?

  • Sure! let me give it to my operator.

  • The heart divided into the right half and left half.

  • These two halves of the heart act as separate pumps

  • each is in charge of pumping blood

  • through one of the two blood vessel circuits. The heart has four chambers

  • the right atrium, right ventricle,

  • the left atrium and the left ventricle,

  • the atria on both sides of the heart receives incoming blood first

  • and then it send it down to the ventricles

  • to be pumped out. the right side of your heart receives oxygen poor blood from the

  • body

  • and pumps it into the lungs

  • to get rid of the carbon dioxide and to pick up the good oxygen.

  • the left side of your heart

  • receives oxygen-rich blood from the lungs

  • and pumps it back into your body.

  • The heart depends on four valves

  • to move the blood in your heart in the right direction.

  • The sound your heart makes

  • comes from the sound of these valves opening and closing.

  • blood pressure is a measurement of the force of the blood

  • as it flows through the arteries of the cardiovascular system.

  • the top number is called the systolic pressure

  • and is the pressure found in the

  • arteries while the heart muscles are squeezing blood

  • out of the heart.

  • the bottom number is the diastolic pressure

  • which is the pressure of the blood as it continues to flow through the arteries

  • between heartbeats.

  • your heart is the most important organ in your body.

  • you could not live without a heart

  • and that is why you need to take care of your heart and keep it really really healthy.

  • these are the main things that you can do to keep your heart healthy.

  • eat healthy foods,

  • exercise every day,

  • and

  • live life tobacco-free.

  • the digestive system.

  • we all love to eat don't we?

  • hello you've reached the digestive system.

  • can I help you? yes please

  • what is the digestive system?

  • when you eat food it goes into your digestive system.

  • your digestive system is responsible for converting the food we eat

  • into energy for our bodies to use.

  • it's like petrol being put into a car.

  • thank you very much.

  • but what does the digestive system consistent of?

  • the digestive system includes

  • mouth, esophagus,

  • liver, stomach,

  • gall bladder, pancreas, large intestine,

  • small intestine and the rectum

  • digestion or breaking down of food into small molecules

  • that will be absorbed into your bloodstream

  • begins when you put food into your mouth.

  • your teeth help to break the food apart. 97 00:06:12,510 --> 00:06:16,810 saliva helps to soften the food

  • and your tongue helps to push the food into your throat

  • and down into your esophagus which is a soft tube

  • that is connected to your stomach.

  • the stomach your little Tummy is a sack

  • that receives the food from the esophagus. your stomach is located just

  • below the heart.

  • the stomach makes digestive juices

  • which include the acids and enzymes that help to break our food down

  • into a thick liquid or paste.

  • your stomach is a muscular organ

  • that is able to move in order to mix the food with the digestive juices.

  • food usually remains in the stomach for about a couple of hours.

  • from the stomach the mashed up food moves into the soft long

  • tube known as the small intestine

  • where most of the digestion takes place. the liver makes a

  • yellowish green fluid called the bile.

  • bile and digested enzymes from the pancreas

  • help releas the nutrients so they can be absorbed

  • and circulated around your body in the bloodstream.

  • the blood bTelephone Ringings the fats, proteins, vitamins

  • and carbohydrates including the sugars to the liver

  • which helps make them into building blocks that the body needs to work and

  • grow.

  • the body does not digest all the food we eat.

  • the undigested food

  • leaves the small intestine and then enters the large intestine.

  • the large intestine is about five feet long,

  • so it is shorter than the small intestine

  • which is about 25 feet long.

  • but I guess it's called the large intestine because its

  • thicker or wider than the small intestine.

  • the undigested food enters the large intestine

  • in a liquidy paste. in the large intestine

  • water is removed from the liquid paste turning what is left

  • into solid waste. the solid waste

  • then collects in the rectum at the end of the large intestine.

  • the solid waste will finally leave the body

  • through an opening called the anus

  • and this is what happens when you poop.

  • keep your digestive system in good shape by eating lots of healthy

  • food.

  • like a lot of fruits and a lot of vegetables.

  • greasy or fatty foods like fast food can be difficult to digest.

  • so try to eat these foods in moderation

  • and don't forget you must drink lots and lots of

  • water. when you take care of your digestive system

  • it will do you right.

  • The respiratory system.

  • we breath in order to take good nice yummy

  • oxygen into our bodies and get rid of the

  • dirty rotten carbon dioxide. I'm breathing hard.

  • are you?

  • Hello you have reached the respiratory system.

  • can I help you? yes please.

  • what is the respiratory system?

  • your respiratory system is made up of the organs in your body

  • that help you breath.

  • you breath so that you can deliver oxygen into your body

  • and take away carbon dioxide.

  • thank you very much. breathing is all about knowing the respiratory system.

  • so what is the respiratory system made up of?

  • the respiratory system is made up of

  • the trachea, the lungs,

  • and the diaphragm. how does the respiratory system work?

  • in when you breath in

  • air you bTelephone Ringinging oxygen it goes into your lungs

  • and when you breath out you blow carbon dioxide out.

  • the diaphragm is a muscle beneath the lungs

  • that helps move air in and out of your body.

  • when you breath in

  • the diaphragm contracts pulling

  • air in through your nose in your mouth through the trachea inflating the lungs

  • just like a baloon. when you breathe out

  • the diaphragm relaxes

  • and moves up to help pushed air out of your lungs

  • out of your nose and mouth.

  • the air you breathe passes into smaller tubes that branches within the lungs.

  • these tiny tubes are called bronchioles

  • and there are about thirty thousand of them

  • in every lung.

  • their tiny air sacs called alveoli

  • at the ended each bronchioles.

  • there are about 600 million alveoli in your lungs.

  • you don't believe it.

  • do you? oxygen in the air you breathe

  • passes through the walls at the alveoli into very small blood vessels

  • called a capillaries then the oxygen-rich blood

  • is pumped throughout your body

  • and the carbon dioxide that is produced by the body

  • moves in the exact opposite way passing from the capillaries

  • into the alveoli and leaving the body when you breathe out.