Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Kowalski: "I want to be a wizard"

  • It's amazing just how much emotional weight

  • that Harry Potter melody carries at the end of this Fantastic Beasts trailer.

  • On a surface level, this use of the main theme serves as an exclamation point,

  • with a strong nostalgic purpose,

  • but,

  • if we were to look back at how music has been played throughout the HP series,

  • we begin to understand that the inclusion of this master theme actually hides a secret message.

  • James Newton Howard, the composer behind the Fantastic Beasts music,

  • is actually the fifth composer to work on a film in the Harry Potter cinematic universe.

  • Working backwards is Alexandre Desplat,

  • Nicholas Hooper,

  • Patrick Doyle, and the man himself, John Williams,

  • who authored the original Harry Potter melody, which is actually titled "Hedwig's Theme."

  • John Williams: "Hedwig needed some music that was gossamer, light,

  • and so I thought Celeste, which is the little keyboard instrument

  • it's like a mini piano, and each note on it,

  • you play it like a piano, but each note is kind of like a bell.

  • It has a pedal like a piano, so if you play five quick notes and put the pedal down

  • you get this beautiful little blur."

  • Williams wrote the music for the first three films, and he summons Hedwig's Theme thirty six times across all three.

  • Twenty four of which are in Philosopher's Stone alone,

  • and sixteen of those times, before Harry even arrives at Hogwarts.

  • While Williams' unrelenting repetition of Hedwig's Theme helps it to stick,

  • It's the how and when this theme is used

  • that is the code to deciphering what Williams is actually trying to teach us.

  • Harry: "Lumos Maxima"

  • This motif is only ever played in moments of courage, or safety.

  • Hedwig's Theme means hope.

  • This concept of hope is important,

  • because if we look at Deathly Hallows part 2,

  • the final and darkest installment in the series,

  • Hedwig's Theme is played only four times.

  • Ron: "Harry talks in his sleep."

  • I say this loosely because the melody never actually completes itself.

  • Hermione: "No, of course not."

  • In the Chamber of Secrets with Ron and Hermione,

  • composer Alexandre Desplat brings back Hedwig's Theme played on its original instrument, the Celeste,

  • to generate that sense of nostalgia and history, but

  • it gets cut off.

  • It's as if this theme, and the hope it brings with it, has been damaged,

  • and, at this point in the complete story, it's no question why.

  • This damaged theme plays for the last time in a piece titled "Harry's Sacrifice,"

  • and it sounds out while Harry walks down to the woods to face Voldemort and, ultimately, his death.

  • The melody is cut off one last time, and we never hear it again.

  • This is hope's end.

  • Harry: "Does it..

  • Does it hurt?

  • Dying?"

  • Sirius: "Quicker than falling asleep."

  • The following music we hear during this interaction with Harry and his family,

  • being sung by a female vocalist,

  • is a piece titled "Lily's theme",

  • which is hauntingly fitting as Lily is the name of Harry's mother.

  • Harry: "Stay close to me."

  • But we've actually heard this theme played twice already in this film,

  • and, up until this point, has been connected to the emotions of another character.

  • Those who know the plot will understand this connection between Snape and Lily.

  • This is musical foreshadowing.

  • Privileging the audience with information on plot and emotional cues,

  • even before the characters know.

  • In this case with Lily's Theme,

  • Alexandre's musical storytelling has hinted at Snape and Lily's connection,

  • even before Harry knew.

  • The second time we hear Lily's theme is in this scene,

  • as Harry collects Snape's memories before he dies.

  • Snape: "Look at me."

  • Snape: "You have your mother's eyes."

  • As we begin to understand how these composers behind Harry Potter are using music,

  • We can hear this type of musical foreshadowing everywhere.

  • Lockhart: "It can't be. Harry potter?"

  • We see this happen earlier with John Williams in the way he writes for Gilderoy Lockhart,

  • in the Chamber of Secrets.

  • This is his musical theme.

  • This might not sound like much, but, if we were to change its key two steps from G to A,

  • We see it shares some similarities to another theme.

  • Lockhart's theme is actually a twisted version of Hedwig's Theme

  • Ron: "Heart of a lion, this one."

  • We're not told right away, but, while Hedwig's Theme speaks of courage and hope,

  • this staggered theme speaks into the arrogant overconfidence of Lockhart's personality,

  • and finally, the reveal of his true nature as the story's anti-hero at the end.

  • Another example of foreshadowing is in Prisoner of Azkaban in the lyrics the choir is singing as we arrive at Hogwarts.

  • These lyrics are the words of a chant used by three witches

  • in Shakespeare's seventeenth century play Macbeth.

  • Macbeth's story is about death,

  • prophecies,

  • and paradoxes.

  • Choir: ♫ Something wicked this way comes

  • In the sixth film, the Half Blood Prince,

  • composer Nicholas Hooper uses music to set the audience up for a strong, emotional journey.

  • He begins the film with Hedwig's Theme, but,

  • slowly takes it over with this new and darker piece.

  • With the film focused on exploring Dumbledore's affection for Harry,

  • we learn this new piece represents just that.

  • Affection and love.

  • The film bookends itself with this exact theme,

  • except now, love and affection are flipped towards Dumbledore himself after his death.

  • This same piece on love and affection is played one more time,

  • during the exploration of Snape's memories in Deathly Hallow's part 2.

  • And even though Snape never says the words we're all thinking,

  • this theme we're now familiar with is speaking of Snape's affection for Lily

  • on his behalf.

  • Dumbedore: "Lily?"

  • Dumbledore: "After all this time?"

  • Snape: "Always."

  • Newt: "Don't panic,

  • there's absolutely nothing to worry about."

  • For ten years, the composers behind the Harry Potter films have been sending us secret messages

  • through the music,

  • regarding the plot and the emotional states, the connections of the characters.

  • And as we return to Hedwig's theme playing in the new trailer,

  • we receive our first secret message.

  • James Newton Howard and the team behind Fantastic Beasts

  • send this message in the form of an important question.

  • "Are you listening?"

  • Hey guys thanks so much for watching

  • um

  • I love HP, it's one of my top five favorite film series ever,

  • next to Back to the Future

  • I wanna quickly send everyone over to my good friend Mitch Cramer, who goes under the name HeavyEyed,

  • he's doing some really cool lowkey stuff on video games,

  • so, click Subscribe and go subscribe swarm him, he's an absolute legend.

  • uh

  • Here's another friendly reminder to go follow my other channel, The Punch Kids,

  • where a few of the guys will get together and play video games and drink whiskey,

  • talk about game design.

  • So please go and Subscribe and hang out with us,

  • there's a really cool community starting around there.

  • um and

  • Lets talk about Harry Potter in the comments section,

  • I love it so much I wanna gush,

  • I wanna talk about the little details.

  • um

  • So yeah, thanks guys for watching

  • and I'll see you later.

Kowalski: "I want to be a wizard"

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US theme harry snape lily potter williams

HARRY POTTER - Hidden Messages In The Music

  • 207 4
    jessica19960717 posted on 2019/03/07
Video vocabulary