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  • I just now looked up when the last time we made a minimalism video was, and it was nine months ago.

  • So it's about time we share another one.

  • I've kind of been reflecting lately about why I started minimalism, and what it means to me,

  • and so in today's video I really want to share certain things that I've learned along the way,

  • and things that I wish I had known before I got started.

  • So let's dive in.

  • Getting rid of things can be a really complex mix of feelings and emotions, and it can have to do with

  • fears of letting go of the past or maybe you're worried about being wasteful,

  • for some people it might mean kind of facing, really uncomfortable mental and emotional clutter,

  • but there's one thing that I've learned and something I wish I knew before I got started.

  • It's a lot easier to let go of things when you have a strong reason to do it.

  • See, I adopted minimalism after having backpacked for six months and having realized

  • that I was kind of at my happiest when I had only a small backpack full of things.

  • The locals I would meet.

  • They also looked like they had so few things,

  • but they were also so fulfilled and joyful with their lives,

  • and having seen that, I realized that the reason I wanted to try minimalism.

  • It was because I didn't want to rely on possessions to make me happy,

  • but instead on experiences and time spent with people.

  • I kind of wish that somebody had told me that willpower alone wouldn't be enough to create or maintain a minimalist lifestyle,

  • but that I would need a strong reason, a strong why power, and I would all come together a lot more easily.

  • I wish that somebody had told me that what works for somebody else might not necessarily work for me.

  • In the beginning I was really eager to learn about minimalism,

  • so I was watching documentaries, reading books, watching YouTube videos,

  • and because I was so motivated I kind of wanted to do everything that everyone was saying.

  • But you see no minimalist gurus or documentary teams are gonna show up at your house to see if you're doing everything correctly

  • or if you're doing it all at once. We're not impressing anybody with our decision to try out minimalism.

  • It's purely a decision we make for ourselves

  • and the wonderful thing about minimalism is there is no right or wrong way to do it.

  • Some people prefer to downsize their possessions in just one or two days,

  • other people might need a couple of weeks or months to do it, and the beautiful thing is that there are no deadlines.

  • And another thing that I've definitely learned is that you don't need your partner or your family members to adopt a minimalist lifestyle for you to do it.

  • It's just between you and your own things, and how those things make you feel.

  • When I first tried to minimize and declutter,

  • I was using the same old techniques I had been using for years

  • and I kind of wish somebody had told me if those techniques weren't working for you before,

  • why do you suddenly think they're gonna start working for you now.

  • Luckily, I had been hearing everywhere and from everybody about a book called The Life-changing Magic of Tidying up by Marie Kondo.

  • By now, you guys know, that I love listening to audiobooks and I've just incorporated it into my daily routine.

  • So I added that book to my list, and let me tell you the glowing reviews on the book do not disappoint.

  • It's more than just a guidebook of practical advice on how to clean and get rid of things.

  • It's also about learning more about ourselves through our attachment to things.

  • One strategy that Marie shares that I use all the time when I'm decluttering is to physically hold an item in your hands,

  • and ask yourself does this item spark joy?

  • Does it make me feel good about myself and my life? If the answer is no, you actually don't want to just throw it away.

  • Marie recommends thanking the item for having once served you before you discard it.

  • If it does spark joy, I don't just put it back anywhere. I find it a home: a place where it can happily live.

  • She speaks about objects as if they're alive and

  • that's kind of just shifted my perception about the things that I own and the things that I'm getting rid of,

  • and she just shares a lot of really golden tips that I definitely recommend for anybody who is

  • new to the minimalist lifestyle or he's just looking for a new way to approach it.

  • As usual audible has been generous enough to partner with us on this video

  • so we can offer you this book or any other book that you like in addition to a 30-day free membership

  • by visiting audible.com forward slash Pick up Limes or you can click that link in the description box below.

  • I feel like everybody who's adopted minimalism at one point or another has felt a little bit guilty for having too much stuff.

  • Maybe, especially in the realm of our work or our hobbies.

  • Like I know that I was personally facing that kind of internal struggle

  • when I was unpacking all of the food photography props at the new studio,

  • because I was thinking to myself, you know, no minimalist would have this many plates, and bowls, and cups, and cutlery.

  • It just seems excessive, but you see here's the thing

  • I use all of those props I use them for the work I do

  • I want to create recipe videos and blog posts that are appealing and each a little bit different

  • than having a selection to choose from, that truly inspires my creativity and it sparks happiness in the work that I do.

  • So I wish someone had told me that minimalism doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing approach.

  • That in some areas, I would live with less and in other areas,

  • I would just consciously live with a little bit more, and I say consciously because

  • even in those areas where I have a little bit more, I try to follow a minimalist mindset even still.

  • Purchasing reused plates and cups if I can or donating old ones that I no longer enjoy or need or use.

  • Remember that minimalism can be used as a guideline rather than a strict set of rules.

  • I wish somebody had told me that being a minimalist does not mean having to be frugal,

  • and while it's true that I tried to purchase fewer things now than I did before,

  • and that I'm trying to purchase things from secondhand stores whenever I can,

  • the truth of the matter is that I'm actually noticing I spend a lot more on each particular item that I purchase now than I did before.

  • Like looking back to what I was doing before I would go and I would buy five or ten dollar sweaters,

  • because they were a good deal.

  • But you know how it goes, you wash those sweaters once or twice and they start to fade,

  • and after a month or two you end up tossing them.

  • So now I don't mind spending a bit more on higher-quality clothes or accessory items or electronic equipment,

  • because in my mind if it lasts longer, it's paying itself off in the long term.

  • It creates less waste and it brings fewer new things into the home

  • I wish that somebody had told me that it's totally okay to treat myself to higher quality products

  • while still fully recognizing that the best things in life are the ones that are free,

  • things like love and relationships, health, and personal growth.

  • An important aspect of minimalism that I've come to really appreciate, is that it kind of forces us to get brutally honest with ourselves.

  • Like sometimes we hang on to certain things, because

  • we think it's gonna motivate us to take action. Like a skinny pair of jeans might motivate us to exercise

  • or that canvas and paint collecting dust might motivate us to get creative.

  • But at what point do those things kind of become tokens of guilt or inadequacy?

  • And how long do we have to keep them for before we realize that it might be negatively impacting our lives.

  • Like are we keeping those things because it's nourishing our soul in some way and does it spark joy?

  • Or do we genuinely plan to use it? Because if that's the case, then we'll absolutely keep it.

  • But if it's an item that's just filled with empty promises,

  • then it might be time to let that thing go.

  • I feel like through everything I've learned and experienced, minimalism has meant living a simpler life

  • and placing value on ourselves and other people and experiences, more than material things.

  • Then I think one of the things I love about it most is the mindset

  • But what about you?

  • What do you wish that you had known before you started down this journey?

  • or were any of the tips that we shared today did you find those helpful?

  • Let me know by sharing in the comments below, and if you enjoyed this video it always means a lot if you give it a thumbs up

  • Thanks a lot for watching, Pick up Limes signing off. We'll see in the next video.

I just now looked up when the last time we made a minimalism video was, and it was nine months ago.

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A2 US minimalism minimalist item kind motivate spark

WHAT I WISH I KNEW BEFORE STARTING MINIMALISM

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    木透 posted on 2019/01/23
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