Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • I've entitled this "Social Pathology."

  • I decided to use the metaphor of disease

  • to describe the current state of social affairs

  • and the trends it foreshadows and perpetuates.

  • I was first introduced to this idea

  • of relating social state to a cellular state

  • by a man named John McMurtry

  • who wrote a book called "The Cancer Stage of Capitalism."

  • The rationale is pretty simple. Just as human beings

  • have to deal with pathogens invading and harming their life system

  • so too does the social system we all share.

  • Of course, these societal diseases are not generated

  • by ways of physical germs or the like.

  • Rather, they come in the form

  • of presupposed principles of preference

  • cultural "memes" that transfer from one to another based on values

  • and hence, belief systems.

  • These "memes" or patterns of perspective and behavior

  • are what eventually result from or comprise

  • the cultural manifestations around us

  • such as the ideas of democracy

  • Republicans, Democrats, the American Dream, etc.

  • In Chapter One we will examine the symptoms

  • and hence diagnose the current stage of disease we are in.

  • Then in Chapter Two we will establish a prognosis

  • meaning what can we expect from the future

  • as the current pathogenic patterns continue.

  • And finally, in Chapter Three, we will discuss treatment

  • for our current state of sickness

  • and this is where the concept of a Resource-Based Economy

  • will be initially examined.

  • However, as an introduction to this

  • I am first going to describe what I call the "invisible prison".

  • This is the closed, intellectual feedback system

  • that consistently slows or even stops

  • new socially altering concepts from coming to fruition.

  • [It] stops progress. Let me explain.

  • The social order, as we know it, is created out of ideas

  • either directly or as a systemic consequence.

  • In other words, somebody somewhere did something

  • which generated a group interest, which then led to the implementation

  • of a specific social component, either in a physical form

  • philosophical form, or both.

  • Once a given set of ideas are entrusted

  • by a large enough group of people, it becomes an institution.

  • And once that institution is made dominant in some way

  • while existing for a certain period of time

  • that institution can then be considered an establishment.

  • Institutional establishments are simply social traditions

  • given the illusion of permanence.

  • In turn, the more established they become

  • the more cultural influence they tend to have on us

  • including our values, and hence, our identities and perspectives.

  • It is not an exaggeration to say that the established institutions

  • governing a person's environment is no less than a conditioning platform

  • to program that person with a specific set of values

  • required to maintain the establishment.

  • Hence, we're going to call these "established value programs".

  • I have found the analogy of computer programming

  • to be a great way to frame this point.

  • While there is always a debate about genetics

  • and environmental influence which

  • Roxanne Meadows will go into at length later in the program

  • it's very easy to understand in the context of values

  • meaning what you think is important and not important

  • that information influences or conditioning

  • is coming from the world around you.

  • Make no mistake, every intellectual concept

  • which each one of us finds merit with

  • is the result of a cultural information influence

  • one way or another.

  • The environment is a self-perpetuating programming process

  • and just like designing a software program for your computer

  • each human being is, advertently and inadvertently

  • programmed into their world view.

  • To continue the analogy, the human brain is a piece of hardware

  • and the environment around you constitutes the programming team

  • which creates the values and perspective.

  • Every word you know has been taught to you one way or another.

  • Every concept and belief you have

  • is a result of this same influence.

  • Jacque Fresco once asked me

  • "How much of you is you?"

  • The answer is kind of a paradox

  • for either nothing is me, or everything is me

  • when it comes to the information I understand and act upon.

  • Information is a serial process, meaning the only way

  • that a human being can come up with any idea

  • is through taking in dependent information

  • that allows that idea to be realized.

  • We appear to be culturally programmed from the moment

  • we come into this world to the moment we die

  • and I'm not going to drill in it much more than that.

  • However, consequently, the cultural attributes

  • we maintain as important values

  • are most often the ones that are reinforced by the external culture.

  • I'm going to say that again.

  • The most dominant cultural attributes maintained

  • are the ones that are reinforced by your environment.

  • If you are born into a society which rewards competition over collaboration

  • then you most likely will adopt those values in order to survive.

  • The point is, we are essentially bio-chemical machines.

  • While the integrity of our machine-processing power

  • and memory is contingent, in part, on genetics

  • the source of our actions come fundamentally

  • from the ideas and experiences installed

  • on our mental hardware by the world around us.

  • However, our biological computer, the human mind

  • has an evolutionarily-installed operating system

  • with some seemingly difficult tendencies built in

  • which tends to limit our objectivity

  • and, hence, our rational thought process.

  • This comes in the form of emotional inclinations.

  • You know, I'm sure many people here have heard the phrase "Be objective!"

  • No human being can be fully objective.

  • That's one of the important things I learned, actually, from Mr. Fresco.

  • Therefore, there's a very common propensity for us humans

  • to find something that works for our needs

  • given the social structure, and then to hold on to it for dear life

  • regardless of new conflicting information which might rationally expect

  • a logical change to occur.

  • Change tends to be feared, for it upsets our associations.

  • And, by the way, when it comes to maintaining income

  • in the monetary system, you see this propensity in full force

  • which I will talk about a lot more later.

  • Therefore, any time someone dares to present an idea outside of

  • or contrary to the establishment programming

  • the reaction is often a condemning of the idea as blasphemy

  • or undermining, or a conspiracy, or simply erroneous.

  • For example, in the academic world investigation often becomes confined

  • to self-referring circles of discourse:

  • closed feedback loops which assume that the foundational assumptions

  • of their schools of thought are empirical

  • and only these experts, as defined by their established credentials

  • are considered viable authorities

  • therein often dominating influence over the public opinion.

  • This is a doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis

  • and please excuse my lack of Hungarian pronunciation

  • but he was a physician who lived in the mid 1800's

  • who performed childbirths.

  • Through a series of events, he realized a pattern

  • that there was a relationship with the transfer of disease

  • and the fact that the doctors of the times

  • never washed their hands after performing autopsies.

  • The doctors of the time would handle dead bodies

  • in the lower elements of the hospitals and then they would go up

  • and they would perform childbirths without washing their hands.

  • So, this doctor, realizing this pattern

  • he started to tell his colleagues about this.

  • He said "You should wash your hands before doing this

  • before performing any type of surgery or childbirth

  • especially after handling a dead body."

  • He was laughed at. He was laughed at and ignored.

  • He published papers and they were dismissed and ridiculed.

  • And after many years of trying this issue, he was finally committed

  • to a mental institution, where he died.

  • It was many years after his death when Louis Pasteur

  • developed the germ theory of disease

  • that his observations were finally understood

  • and people realized what a horrible mistake had been made.

  • In the words of John McMurtry, professor of philosophy in Canada

  • "In the last dark age, one can search

  • the inquiries of this era's preserved thinkers

  • from Augustine to Ockham and fail to discover

  • a single page of criticism of the established social framework

  • however rationally insupportable feudal bondage, absolute paternalism

  • divine right of kings, and the rest may be."

  • In the current final order, is it so different?

  • Can we see in any media, or even university press

  • a paragraph of clear unmasking

  • of the global regime that condemns

  • a third of all children to malnutrition

  • with more food than enough available?