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  • Are there any words that you're pronouncing wrongly in English?

  • Let's find out.

  • We're going to look at ten words that are tricky, see how some English learners say

  • them and see how Jay and I say them.

  • So in British and American English.

  • Ready?

  • First word

  • Comfortables - ah, no 's'.

  • Comfortable.

  • Comfortable.

  • Comfortable.

  • No, no, no.

  • It's comfortable.

  • Comfortable.

  • 3 syllables.

  • We write it like it has 4 - comf-or-ta-ble, but the 'or' disappears.

  • Comfortable Comfortable.

  • That's the thing about English pronunciation.

  • We often don't say what we write.

  • OK.

  • Next one.

  • Months, months, months.

  • Months Months.

  • Not bad.

  • It's hard to pronounce this word because it's got the 'th' sound quickly followed

  • by 's'.

  • You have to pull your tongue back very fast.

  • Months.

  • Months.

  • Be careful not to say month-es.

  • It's just one syllable.

  • Months.

  • Now here's a secret.

  • If you say muns or munts, we'll understand.

  • We say that too when we're speaking fast.

  • Muns.

  • Munts.

  • OK, next one.

  • Receep.

  • Receep.

  • Nope.

  • Recipe.

  • Nearly.

  • It has three syllables but the stress is on the first syllable.

  • Recipe Mmmm.

  • This soup is delicious.

  • It was my mother's recipe.

  • The next word looks similar.

  • Recept.

  • Receipt.

  • Recept.

  • No.

  • We don't pronounce the 'p'.

  • It's silent.

  • Receipt Receipt

  • A receipt is a document that shows you've paid for something.

  • Let's hear it in a sentence.

  • Yes?

  • I'd like to return this sweater.

  • Do you have the receipt?

  • No, I'm sorry.

  • I lost it.

  • Did you pay by credit card?

  • No, I paid cash.

  • Then I'm sorry.

  • I can't help you.

  • But I just bought it this morning.

  • Next word.

  • Literature.

  • Literature.

  • Literature.

  • It's hard.

  • How many syllables does it have?

  • Jay and I say it differently.

  • Literature.

  • Literature.

  • Did you hear the difference?

  • In British English it just has three syllables and in American it has four.

  • Lit-e-ra-ture.

  • Lite-ra-ture.

  • Literature.

  • Literature.

  • There's a great way to practise long words like this.

  • It's called backchaining.

  • You start at the back of the word and work forward.

  • ture-rature-literature.

  • Try it.

  • ture-rature-literature.

  • Great.

  • Next one.

  • Let's have something easier.

  • Busy.

  • Busy.

  • It's nearly right but notice the vowel sound.

  • It's not ooo - and it's not u like in bus.

  • It's /I/ like in bit.

  • Can we talk?

  • I'm a bit busy.

  • Busy.

  • Busy.

  • OK, next one.

  • Debt.

  • Debt.

  • No.

  • Debt.

  • Pretty close!

  • Debt. Debt.

  • A debt is money that you owe someone.

  • You borrowed some money and now you're in debt.

  • But the letter b is silent.

  • Listen.

  • Debt.

  • Debt.

  • Another word like that is doubtwhen you're not sure if something is true.

  • Yes.

  • That has a silent 'b' too.

  • I doubt if you can say the next word.

  • Let's see.

  • Hierarchy.

  • Hierarchy.

  • Hierarchy.

  • No, that's not right.

  • Hierarchy.

  • Hierarchy.

  • This word means a system where people are organized into different levels of importance.

  • So like in a company with the boss at the top.

  • Hierarchy.

  • Hi-er-ar-chyit's four syllables but sometimes we run the first two together so

  • it's almost three.

  • Hier-ar-chy.

  • Let's back chain it.

  • Say it with me.

  • chyarchyhierarchy.

  • Great, next one.

  • This one's very common.

  • Aren't.

  • Aren't.

  • Aren't.

  • No, all wrong.

  • When you contract are and not, you have to make them one syllable.

  • But Jay and I say this word differently.

  • Listen.

  • Aren't.

  • Aren't.

  • My r is much softer and Jay's is stronger.

  • Aren't.

  • Aren't.

  • Say it the American way!

  • It doesn't matter which way you say it, but make sure it has just one syllable.

  • And sometimes we don't pronounce the 't'.

  • Yeah.

  • When we're speaking casually we both put a stop on the t, so it ends abruptly.

  • Aren'.

  • Aren' - We aren' finished yet.

  • That's right.

  • We aren'.

  • Here's the next word Crisps.

  • Crisps.

  • Crisps.

  • Crisps.

  • Crisps.

  • These are crisps.

  • The tricky thing here is the 'sps' at the endsps.

  • Try it.

  • sps. sps.

  • Crisps Crisps

  • But we don't call these crisps in America.

  • We call them potato chips.

  • Say chips.

  • No chips are different.

  • We have fish and chips.

  • They're French fries.

  • OK, last word.

  • This one's very tricky.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Thoroughly.

  • No, I don't know.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Je sais pa.

  • It's very hard.

  • It's got a th sound and then an ^ vowel and then an r and an l sound.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Thoroughly.

  • Thoroughly.