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  • Stop to buy bread from the supermarket.

  • Stop buying bread from the supermarket!

  • Do these two sentences have the same meaning?

  • No and in this lesson I'll show you why.

  • Hello I'm Emma from mmmEnglish.

  • Today I'm going to show you how verb patterns

  • can affect the meaning of sentences in English.

  • You see, a verb followed by a gerund

  • can have a completely different meaning

  • than if the same verb is followed by an infinitive verb.

  • Wow wow wow wow wow wow wow!

  • What's a gerund?

  • A gerund looks like a verb but it's actually a noun.

  • It's formed by adding -ing to the end

  • of the base form of the verb.

  • So a gerund is the base form with -ing.

  • 'listen' plus -ing

  • Listening to music helps me relax.

  • This lesson right here will explain gerunds

  • for you in much more detail.

  • But the infinitive is the base form of the verb.

  • But there are two types of infinitives in English.

  • The to-infinitive which is

  • the verb with 'to'.

  • 'to listen'

  • I prefer not to listen to music when I'm working.

  • But there's also the zero infinitive or the base form.

  • So that's the verb without 'to'.

  • Please listen carefully to my instructions.

  • Today we're focusing on the to-infinitive

  • so the verb with 'to'

  • and there are many, many verbs in English

  • that can be followed either by a gerund

  • or the to-infinitive.

  • Now you may hear this called a verb pattern,

  • when two verbs appear together in a sentence.

  • Some verbs completely change meaning when they're

  • followed by either a gerund or the to-infinitive.

  • So back to today's big question.

  • What's the difference between 'stop buying bread'

  • and 'stop to buy bread'?

  • Well 'stop' with a gerund means to quit an action.

  • Stop buying bread from the supermarket.

  • It's an order

  • to never buy bread again from the supermarket.

  • Maybe the bread is too expensive or it's not good quality

  • but whatever the reason,

  • 'stop buying bread from the supermarket' means

  • don't buy bread there anymore.

  • Since we're talking about completely quitting an action,

  • this is also the form that you should use

  • when you're talking about addictions or bad habits.

  • Stop smoking cigarettes, it's bad for your health!

  • I wish you'd stop biting your nails, it's gross!

  • Do you have a bad habit that you know you should

  • stop doing?

  • Write a sentence about it in the comments below.

  • Make sure you use the gerund form, right?

  • Okay so there's a quick ad break right now,

  • just enough time for you to write your sentence

  • before we move on to 'stop' with the infinitive form.

  • 'stop' with the to-infinitive means to pause

  • or leave one action to do another.

  • Stop to buy bread from the supermarket.

  • So this is also an order or an instruction but it's

  • to stop at the supermarket as you go past

  • and get some bread.

  • So you stop the action of walking or driving by.

  • You interrupt that action

  • to go and buy some bread from the supermarket

  • but then you would continue back on your journey.

  • So let's talk about a few more examples.

  • Make sure you stop to talk to Sara

  • before you leave work today,

  • she's got something important to tell you.

  • I worked all day, I didn't even stop to eat lunch!

  • Okay, great!

  • So 'stop' followed by a gerund

  • has a completely different meaning

  • to 'stop' followed by the to-infinitive.

  • Now do all verbs change meaning when

  • they're followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

  • That's a good question but the answer is no.

  • Some verbs keep the same meaning

  • if they're followed by a gerund or the to-infinitive.

  • Let's take a look at the word 'start'.

  • We start eating dinner at seven.

  • We start to eat dinner at seven.

  • Is there a big difference in meaning

  • between these two sentences?

  • Nope.

  • So how do you know which verbs change meaning

  • when followed by a gerund or an infinitive?

  • Now the answer is not as simple as you want it to be.

  • You need to learn them.

  • You need to study, get familiar with different

  • verb patterns and practise using them.

  • The more you see and use these verb patterns,

  • the more naturally you'll start to use them.

  • But to get you started I've got some more

  • common verbs and their meanings

  • when they're followed by a gerund or an infinitive verb.

  • So don't stop watching,

  • it's just getting interesting!

  • Forget.

  • I'll never forget watching my first horror movie...

  • Don't forget to watch the news tonight!

  • Do these verb patterns have the same meaning?

  • No, not at all!

  • 'forget' with a gerund means to look back

  • at past memories.

  • I'll never forget watching my first horror movie...

  • I was so scared that I couldn't sleep for weeks!

  • I wish I could forget falling down the stairs

  • in front of the whole school.

  • So let's try this together,

  • do you have an embarrassing memory that you wish

  • you could forget?

  • Write a sentence in the comments below

  • so that I can check it for you.

  • Now 'forget' with the to-infinitive is used

  • to give a reminder to someone,

  • to make sure that they do something,

  • that they don't forget.

  • Don't forget to watch the news tonight!

  • I was interviewed on the main street today,

  • so I don't want you to miss it!

  • Don't forget to bring your tickets,

  • otherwise, they won't let you in to the show!

  • Remember.

  • Do you remember dancing with me on our first date?

  • Remember to take lots of pictures on your trip.

  • Do you notice any similarities between

  • 'forget' and 'remember'?

  • 'remember' with a gerund is used to talk about

  • is used to talk about a memory.

  • What do you remember about your first date?

  • I remember eating ribs covered in

  • sticky sauce with my hands!

  • Thanks Shah!

  • It was really awkward I had sticky stuff

  • coming all the way down my arms.

  • Gross!

  • What do you remember about your first date?

  • Write it in the comments.

  • Now remember with the to-infinitive

  • is used to talk about something

  • that someone needs to do to remind them

  • to do something.

  • Remember to whisk the eggs before adding the sugar.

  • Remember to turn at the intersection,

  • otherwise, you'll get stuck on a one-way road.

  • Regret.

  • The verb 'regret' with a gerund is used to talk about

  • something that you did in the past,

  • that you aren't happy about anymore.

  • You know, decisions that you made in the past that you

  • wish you didn't make.

  • When you wish you could go back in time

  • and change those actions.

  • He regretted yelling at her as soon as she walked away.

  • He woke up with a pounding headache and immediately

  • regretted drinking so much the night before.

  • What do you wish you could go back in time and change

  • Can you write a sentence about it?

  • Add it to the comments.

  • Now 'regret' with the to-infinitive

  • is used to tell someone bad news

  • or something that they don't want to hear.

  • And this verb pattern is really formal language.

  • And it's always followed by bad news.

  • So these are the words that you don't want to hear

  • after a job interview.

  • I regret to say that I wasn't impressed

  • by the performance.

  • We regret to inform you that you have ten days left

  • to pay the account, otherwise, we'll close it.