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  • You're sitting there,

  • and it's incredibly frustrating.

  • It's maddening.

  • You've been sitting there for hours,

  • filling in those little tiny circles with your No. 2 pencil --

  • this is a standardized test.

  • You look up, half-erased chalkboard,

  • you can see that perfectly written cursive alphabet,

  • the pull-down maps,

  • you can hear, tick, tick, tick, ticking on the wall, that industrial clock.

  • But most importantly, you can feel that oppressive fluorescent light,

  • that death ray over your head.

  • Bzzzzzz.

  • And you can't take it anymore, but you don't have to,

  • because Miss Darling says, "OK, boys and girls, you're done."

  • So you jump up -- I mean, there is nothing left of you but a vapor trail.

  • You move so quickly, you slam that little molded plastic chair,

  • and you sprint down the hallway;

  • you go past the Lysol smell and the BO smell and the cubbies,

  • and you push the door --

  • (Inhales deeply)

  • and finally, you're outside.

  • Oh, you can feel the wind on your face,

  • then the sun on your skin

  • and most importantly, the big blue sky.

  • That is a revelation of space.

  • Making revelations of space is what I do; I'm a designer and creative director,

  • and that's what I do for a living.

  • I do it for all sorts of people in all kinds of different ways,

  • and it might seem complicated, but it's not.

  • And over the next couple of minutes, I'm going to give you three ways

  • that I think you can move through your world

  • so that you, too, can make revelations of space, or at least reveal them.

  • Step one: therapy.

  • I know, I know, I know: blah, blah, blah, New Yorker, blah, blah, blah, therapy.

  • But seriously, therapy -- you have to know why you're doing these things, right?

  • When I got the job of designing "Hamilton,"

  • I sat with Lin-Manuel Miranda, writer,

  • Tommy Kail, director, and I said,

  • "Why are we telling this 246-year-old story?

  • What is it about the story that you want to say,

  • and what do you want people to feel like when they experience the show?"

  • It's important. When we get that, we move into step two: the design phase.

  • And I'll give you some little tricks about that,

  • but the design phase is important because we get to make these cool toys.

  • I reach into Lin's brain, he reaches into mine,

  • this monologue becomes a dialogue.

  • And I make these cool toys,

  • and I say, "Does this world look like the world

  • that you think could be a place where we could house your show?"

  • If the answer is yes -- and when the answer is yes --

  • we move into what I think is the most terrifying part,

  • which is the execution phase.

  • The execution phase is when we get to build this thing,

  • and when this conversation goes from a few people to a few hundred people

  • now translating this idea.

  • We put it in this beautiful little thing,

  • put it in the "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" super-sizer machine

  • and blow it up full-scale,

  • and we never know if we did it right

  • until we show up onstage and go, "Is it OK? Is it OK?"

  • Here's the thing:

  • you don't have to be Lin,

  • you don't have to have a book that you want to turn into a show

  • in order to do this in your real life.

  • You're already starring in a show, by the way. It's called your life.

  • Congratulations. (Laughter)

  • But seriously, Shakespeare said it: "All the world's a stage."

  • He nailed that part.

  • What he screwed up royally was that part where he said,

  • "And we are merely players."

  • It's ridiculous. We're not merely players.

  • We are the costume designers and the lighting designers

  • and the makeup artists in our own world,

  • and I want to get you to think about being the set designer in your world.

  • Because I think you can leave here if you do these three steps

  • and a couple of little tricks, as I said, I'm going to tell you,

  • and you can begin to change the world

  • the way you want to.

  • You want to do it?

  • OK. Everybody write a show.

  • (Laughter)

  • No. Just kidding.

  • OK. Step one: therapy. Right?

  • How are you feeling?

  • That's what the therapist says: "How are you feeling today?"

  • It's important to remember that, because when we design the world for you,

  • the therapy is important.

  • It tells you that emotion is going to become light and color.

  • A good example of that light and color

  • is a show I designed called "Dear Evan Hansen."

  • (Cheers)

  • "Dear Evan Hansen" exists -- oh my God --

  • "Dear Evan Hansen" exists in a world of almost all light and color.

  • So I chose a color: inky-black darkness.

  • (Laughter)

  • Inky-black darkness is a color the way that sadness is an emotion.

  • And this show transforms people, but not before it wrecks people.

  • I bet you're wondering, "How expensive could the set possibly be to transform you

  • if you sit for two hours and 20 minutes

  • in inky-black darkness?"

  • The answer is: cheap!

  • Inky-black darkness,

  • turn the lights on at the right time.

  • Seriously, think about leaving Miss Darling's class.

  • Inky-black darkness gives way at the right moment,

  • we fly away that wall and reveal a beautiful blue sky.

  • It blows people away and it transports them,

  • and it makes them feel hopeful.

  • And we know this because color is emotion,

  • and when you paint with color, you're painting with feelings.

  • So think about that emotion, the one I had you file away in your mental Rolodex.

  • What color is it?

  • Where in your wardrobe does it exist, and where in your home does it exist?

  • When we design the show for you,

  • we're going to use that color to tell you how you feel in certain times.

  • But also, you know this exists because you put the hero in white,

  • you put the lead character in red, you put the villain in all black.

  • It's typecasting. You know that.

  • So think about it.

  • But there's also something else that happens in the world

  • that helps us move through the world in a safe way.

  • They're called architectural standards.

  • They make us not fall down and go boom.

  • Doorknobs are all at the same height. Light switches are all at the same height.

  • Toilet bowls are always -- thank God -- at the same height,

  • because no one ever misses the toilet bowl.

  • But seriously,

  • what would happen if we started to tweak those architectural standards

  • to get what we wanted?

  • It reminds me of the stairs I made for Pee-Wee Herman.

  • Pee-Wee Herman is a child,

  • and his entire world is created so that we perceive Pee-Wee as a child.

  • The architecture and the furniture and everything come to life,

  • but nothing more important than those stairs.

  • Those stairs are 12 inches high,

  • so when Pee-Wee clomps up and down those stairs,

  • he interacts with them like a kid.

  • You can't fake that kind of interaction,

  • and that's the exact opposite of what we ask people in opera to do.

  • In opera, we shrink those stairs

  • so that our main characters can glide up and down effortlessly

  • without ever breaking their voice.

  • You could never put an opera singer in Pee-Wee's Playhouse,

  • (Sings in Pee-Wee's voice) or they wouldn't be able to do their job.

  • (Laughter)

  • But you couldn't put Pee-Wee in an opera set.

  • He couldn't climb up and down those stairs.

  • There'd be no Pee-Wee.

  • He'd be like James Bond slinking elegantly up and down the stairs.

  • It wouldn't work.

  • (Laughter)

  • Now think of your set, your home, what you exist in every single day.

  • If you're anything like me, the trash can is just too small

  • for the amount of takeout that you buy every night, right?

  • And I find myself jamming like I'm kneading dough at a pizza place,

  • I'm jamming it in because I don't understand.

  • Or, maybe the light switch in your foyer

  • is just stashed behind too many precariously placed coats,

  • and so you don't even go for it.

  • Therefore, day after day,

  • you wind up walking in and out of a chasm of darkness.

  • (Laughter)

  • It's true.

  • But what would happen if the space revealed something about yourself

  • that you didn't even know?

  • Kanye never told me specifically that he wanted to be God.

  • But --

  • (Laughter)

  • when we started working together, we were sending images back and forth,

  • and he sent me a picture of the aurora borealis

  • with lightning strikes through it.

  • And he sent me pictures from a mountaintop looking down

  • at a smoke-filled canyon,

  • or smoke underneath the surface of water --

  • like, epic stuff.

  • So the first set I designed for him was a huge light box

  • with the name of his record label.

  • He would stand triumphantly in front of it,

  • and it would flash lights like a lightning bolt.

  • And it was epic, but, like, starter-kit epic.

  • We moved on to a large swath of sky with a tear down the middle,

  • and through the tear, you could see deep parts of the cosmos.

  • Getting closer.

  • We evolved to standing on top of an obelisk,

  • standing on top of a mountainside, standing on top of boxes.

  • You know, he was evolving as an artist through space,

  • and it was my job to try and keep up.

  • When we did Coachella,

  • there he was,

  • standing in front of an 80-foot-wide by 40-foot-tall ancient artifact,

  • literally handed down from God to man.

  • He was evolving, and we were all witness to it.

  • And in his last show, which I didn't design but I witnessed,

  • he had self-actualized.

  • He was literally standing on a floating plexiglass deck

  • over his adoring fans,

  • who had no choice but to praise to Yeezus up above.

  • (Laughter)

  • He had deified himself.

  • You can't become Yeezus in your living room.

  • The space told him who he was about himself,

  • and then he delivered that to us.

  • When I was 20 years old,

  • I was driving through a parking lot, and I saw a puddle.

  • I thought, "I'm going to veer to the left. No -- I'm going through it."

  • And I hit the puddle, and -- ffftt! -- all the water underneath my car,

  • and instantly, I have an aha moment.

  • Light bulb goes off.

  • Everything in the world needs to be designed.

  • I mean, I'm sure I was thinking, "The drainage needs to be designed

  • in this parking lot."

  • But then I was like, "Everything in the world needs to be designed."

  • And it's true: left to its own devices,

  • Mother Nature isn't going to carve an interesting or necessarily helpful path

  • for you.

  • I've spent my career reaching into people's minds

  • and creating worlds out here that we can all interact with.

  • And yeah, you might not get to do this with fancy collaborators,

  • but I think if you leave here, those three easy steps --

  • therapy, who do I want to be, why do I do the things that I do;

  • design, create a plan and try and follow through with it,

  • what can I do;

  • execute it --

  • I think if you add that with a little color theory --

  • (Laughter)

  • some cool design choices and a general disrespect for architectural standards,

  • you can go out

  • and create the world that you want to live in,

  • and I am going to go home and buy a new trash can.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

You're sitting there,

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【TED】David Korins: 3 ways to create a space that moves you, from a Broadway set designer (3 ways to create a space that moves you, from a Broadway set designer | David Korins)

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    林宜悉 posted on 2018/10/31
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