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  • - Hello, hello, hello.

  • - Still in San Francisco.

  • - And my name is Steve-O.

  • - And now it's time to not have spaghetti-O

  • but to have spaghetti.

  • - Today on worth it we're going to be trying

  • three excellent forms of spaghetti,

  • at drastically different price points

  • to find out which one is the most worth it at it's price.

  • ^- What is the singular of spaghetti?

  • - Spaghet?

  • - This will not be a traditional Italian food episode.

  • We are doing spaghetti as it's made in America.

  • - It has become an American staple.

  • - Possibly my favorite food.

  • - Pasta-bly?

  • - Yeah, pasta-bly my favorite food.

  • - So we're first headed off to a place called Barzotto.

  • - We're getting truly an American classic,

  • spaghetti and meatballs.

  • ^(upbeat music)

  • ^- I'm Michelle Minori, I'm the executive chef of Barzotto.

  • ^Here in the mission and today we're gonna have

  • ^spaghetti and meatballs.

  • So Barzotto is a fast, casual concept

  • where you can come in and get a great bowl

  • of handmade pasta without costing an arm and a leg.

  • - So I take it you make all of your noodles in house?

  • - We do, we make everything here from scratch by hand.

  • Starts with semolina flour, we get from Justo's,

  • tap water and you actually need it in this machine

  • until it looks like wet sand.

  • We use bronze dies, so you know they get hot really fast.

  • we have a really amazing pasta extruder,

  • it comes out of the extruder it's got all

  • these tiny little scratches on them.

  • So we want the dough to be the perfect hydration

  • so those little striations or scratches,

  • just really catch that rich sauce.

  • - [Andrew] So it's textured a little bit.

  • - So not super smooth like that stuff you find

  • in the store, most of the time the noodles have

  • a specific length, which is around nine inches.

  • But ours we make it 18 because we want to be extra fun.

  • (laughs)

  • it doesn't have to be super Italian here.

  • We also air dry our pasta for about an hour

  • because you're never gonna truly get like an al dente pasta

  • when it's fresh, so we make a really rich marinara sauce

  • and then of course we have our meatballs.

  • They're part turkey and part pork.

  • We pour that rich marinara over them and we back them.

  • We drop our noodles in the water

  • and all of our noodles cook around three to four minutes

  • and then they all come together in the pan

  • so that sauce really soaks into the noodle,

  • top it with Parmigiano and fresh herbs.

  • There's a really cool place in the fact that, you know,

  • all of our houses are 20 bucks or less.

  • All of our wine's 10 bucks by the glass.

  • And you can't go anywhere in San Francisco

  • and get a bowl of pasta for $14.

  • That's unheard of.

  • We want to make really good food

  • and we want to give you really good service.

  • - [Andrew] Here we go spaghetti.

  • ^- And meatballs, cheerio.

  • - Cheerio.

  • I'm just gonna take a little bit, just the way

  • that the noodle feels on the fork,

  • you can tell it still has that stiffness,

  • that structural integrity to the noodle.

  • Cheers.

  • (jazzy music)

  • Oh damn.

  • - Mmm, there is a bite to that spaghetti.

  • - I'm blown away by this noodle.

  • - It's the lack of slipperiness.

  • - [Andrew] Yes, friction going in.

  • - It's like when you're trying to climb a rope

  • you need a rope with friction to climb it to the top.

  • - Adam get right in here.

  • We're not wasting any time this time.

  • - And bring in the reliever

  • from the very beginning.

  • - So good.

  • This is the noodle and he is the sauce

  • and I'm latched on.

  • We move as a unit.

  • - [Andrew] Meatball time.

  • Oh yeah.

  • - Oh,

  • - [Andrew] Such a luscious meatball.

  • I don't know what is better in this bowl,

  • the meatball or the spaghetti?

  • Ultimate pasta dish.

  • - [Michelle] We also do a full roasted Porchetta,

  • - Really?

  • - Yeah it's the best in the city.

  • - [Andrew] Is it the whole like half pig deal?

  • - We play on that, so we fabricate our own with a loin

  • and a belly and then we roast it.

  • ^- Oh man, - mmm.

  • ^- Here's the porchetta.

  • ^- Oh, oh.

  • - How could we resist, I can't believe you can also get this

  • at a place where you get a $14 bowl

  • of spaghetti and meatballs.

  • ^Oh.

  • - Long spaghetti, fresh pasta, meatballs, classic.

  • - And the surprise porchetta.

  • Pulling it out of left field.

  • Pulling it out of

  • the oven. - The oven.

  • So we're back in Los Angeles now.

  • Spaghetti,

  • - Fact.

  • - Fact!

  • ^Spaghetti fact.

  • ^- Spaghetto is the singular form of spaghetti.

  • ^- What no!

  • - Did we already talk about this earlier?

  • ^What is the singular of spaghetti.

  • - So one spaghetto, plus another spaghetto equals spaghetti.

  • - So now we're in Los Angeles, we're heading Downtown

  • to a place called Cento pasta bar.

  • It's actually a lunch pasta spot inside of a wine bar.

  • - That's awesome, it's like a mullet.

  • Pasta in the day, wine at night.

  • Cento pasta bar.

  • ^(upbeat music)

  • ^- Hi so I'm Avner, this is my restaurant,

  • ^it's called Cento pasta bar.

  • Cento means 100.

  • I find that pasta for lunch,

  • 100 grams is the perfect portion.

  • If not you feel groggy and weighed down afterwards.

  • So our whole thing is we're only open for lunch,

  • we do a hundred gram portions of pasta

  • and at night they just do the wine bar.

  • it's called Mignon wine bar.

  • I change the menu every week, but we only keep one thing

  • on the menu, its our beet spaghetti and that's what you guys

  • are gonna be trying.

  • - [Steve] Why beets?

  • - I had to do vegetarian option.

  • It wasn't just pesto, I think everyone does pesto.

  • So I really like beets but I find that

  • a lot of people don't like beets.

  • They don't like beets

  • because they think they're cooked wrong.

  • So I clean the beats pretty well.

  • I roast them until they're really dehydrated

  • and their flavor is just concentrated.

  • I puree it, I brown some butter in a pan,

  • add a little poppy seed,

  • it's a very traditional, Italian combination,

  • poppy seeds, beets, add the puree,

  • we only get Italian pasta.

  • I find that the wheat tastes better so I cook the spaghetti

  • in salted water and then I finish it in the sauce

  • so it picks up this beautiful purple color.

  • I do it a little less than too al dente

  • but I make it al dente enough.

  • The flavors kind of evolve in your mouth.

  • - [Andrew] So fresh versus hard pasta?

  • - There's no better, I don't think and there's no worse.

  • It's all about what direction you're going.

  • I find that hard pastas have again, the flavor of wheat

  • far more than fresh pastas.

  • With this one it's sweets because its beets.

  • But it's also a deep flavor and I think the brown butter

  • really compliments it.

  • I put the ricotta cheese on top.

  • Just a dollop of it on top

  • and then some chives on top of that.

  • So this is a really good contrast