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  • (lighthearted electronic music)

  • - Oh!

  • Almost.

  • Cinema Series.

  • (knife blade snaps)

  • Oh, it's like a nice easy sticker to open, that's uh-

  • just use my eyeballs next time.

  • Ooh.

  • Sticker.

  • Instructions.

  • (paper crinkling)

  • Fancy lens cloth.

  • Soft case with

  • built in lens cloth, oh yeah.

  • Super soft hard case, like the softest of cases.

  • Inside you have the money item.

  • (ambient electronica music)

  • Check out these tasty quartz lined ND filters.

  • Delicious look at that, Mm!

  • ND1000, that's like pure black.

  • You take this, place it into your hand,

  • it completely vanishes and then you are-

  • you're done, you're good to go, you got, you got nothin'.

  • That's the way I store my filters,

  • just to you know, save bag space. Ha!

  • (rhythmic rock music)

  • (ambient techno music)

  • You're full of confidence and cheap cologne

  • You're showing off your moves in hope for attention

  • - What's up everybody! Peter McKinnon here

  • and welcome back to, yes! Another two minute Tuesday.

  • It's so great to have you here,

  • and to see all of your smiling faces.

  • Guess what? I'm gonna try and make you a promise today.

  • I might break it, I might not.

  • I'm gonna try and stick to two minutes,

  • and I'm gonna do that by committing right now

  • by putting two minutes on the clock.

  • (echoing boom) Let's go!

  • Okay, so today we're talking about how to make your photos

  • and your videos more professional,

  • and you're gonna do that by using filters

  • in front of your lens.

  • There are so many different types of filters

  • that you can screw on to your lenses,

  • that you can even magnetize to some of your lenses

  • depending on the mount.

  • But these are going to give you drastic changes

  • both when you're shooting photos

  • and when you're shooting video.

  • Now we talked about ND filters before

  • and that'll be the biggest change

  • that you have when you're shooting videos.

  • Having nice depth of field in the background

  • like we have right now, where it's smooth and creamy

  • and delicious, and it's very blown out.

  • It's a very shallow depth of field.

  • That is a very professional look that a lot of people want.

  • Now when you're outside and it's super bright,

  • usually when you're shooting at a very wide aperture

  • and if you don't know what that means,

  • you can check this video here which is camera basics,

  • you want to shoot at that wide open aperture

  • to get that nice, soft, shallow background.

  • But if you're outside and it's so bright

  • and you open up that lens to let tons of light in,

  • well it's already too bright and now you're

  • letting even more light in, so how is that gonna work?

  • That's when you put an ND filter over the front of your lens

  • and the best way to explain it

  • is like sunglasses for your camera,

  • everyone uses that analogy for a very specific reason.

  • So check this out. Let's say we're outside right now.

  • This shot that you're looking at,

  • that's how I want it exposed.

  • We're at 1.4, that lens is wide open,

  • nothing's shallow, it doesn't look good.

  • You'll see as I just move this piece of glass,

  • this ND filter in front of the lens,

  • look how much better that looks!

  • Now we have that professional look outside

  • despite how bright it is.

  • (clicks keyboard)

  • I just realized I didn't actually tell you the reason

  • you need an ND outside for video while I'm editing this.

  • So really quick, a little caveat

  • so that this all makes sense,

  • is when you're shooting video,

  • you want to maintain your shutter angle.

  • Meaning you want to shoot video, double your frame rate

  • so that it looks the smoothest when it comes to motion blur.

  • If you're not shooting double your frame rate,

  • the motion blur isn't natural,

  • so it feels jittery and it just looks weird,

  • and people watching your videos and your films

  • will just think, "This looks a bit choppy" or "interesting"

  • and that's because your shutter speed

  • is not matched to your frame rate.

  • So if we're shooting at 24 frames a second,

  • and we're shooting video on a DSLR,

  • we're gonna move our shutter speed to 1/50th of a second

  • and you always want to keep it there.

  • You can compensate for the brightness outside

  • by cranking that shutter up to you know, 1/250th

  • and it would look fine on your screen,

  • but then that motion blur won't look good.

  • So you have to keep that shutter speed at 1/50th.

  • But herein lies the problem,

  • that the footage is just too bright,

  • it just doesn't look good,

  • which is why you slide the ND filter over the lens

  • which basically exposes everything properly.

  • Another reason why cinema cameras are so expensive

  • because they have built in ND filters,

  • they don't even need anything over them.

  • I'm shooting on one right now, for example,

  • where's the button, where is it?

  • Look at this, all I have to do is press this button

  • and it adds and de-filters at different stops

  • right over my footage.

  • It's incredible!

  • Anyways, I figured I would just kind of throw that in there

  • because the video doesn't really make sense without it.

  • Moving on.

  • So that look is going to make your films,

  • your projects if you're working for somebody,

  • yourself, for a corporation, anything,

  • it's gonna make your projects, your work, more professional.

  • That's using an ND.

  • Now we're gonna talking about something called a polarizer.

  • If you've never heard of it,

  • it's also a filter that screws on the front of your lens,

  • but what this is going to do is bring out more

  • of the blues in the sky.

  • So it's gonna punch those colors,

  • it's gonna extract that nice saturation

  • from these very vibrant scenes

  • that may not otherwise be picked up

  • from your camera as vibrant as you see them.

  • A good example of this is when I went

  • to the Bahamas a couple years ago.

  • I made sure to shoot all my tropical photos

  • with a polarizer on because it made those blues

  • way darker and richer blue, it really pulls that out.

  • Another good thing is using these polarizers

  • on your done shot, because your drone footage

  • is gonna look even better and more colorful

  • when you have a polarizer on.

  • But my favorite use for a polarizer,

  • because they're also known

  • to cut reflections out of windows,

  • is if you're doing a time-lapse from a hotel window

  • and you have that reflection in the background

  • of your actual room that you're staying in,

  • you want to get rid of that, you throw a polarizer on,

  • it's gonna cut right through the glass and look amazing.

  • And then it also doubles as giving you that refection.

  • You'll notice a lot of Hollywood directors and DPs

  • use polarizers to get the reflection out of a car window

  • when you see someone driving in a really cinematic scene.

  • Half their face is perfectly exposed

  • and the other half might be all the trees passing

  • on the road that they're driving in,

  • and that is one of my absolute favorite

  • types of shooting styles when I see that in a movie.

  • It's super cinematic, it looks incredible,

  • and you're gonna get that with the polarizer.

  • I'm pretty sure that was already two minutes,

  • so I apologize.

  • I mean no, I'm not sorry!

  • We're crushing good content right here.

  • All right, next up is something called the Black Pro-Mist.

  • Now you might be like, "What is that, Pete?"

  • "What does that even mean?"