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  • Neil: Hello. Welcome to 6 Minute English,

  • I'm Neil.

  • Rob: And I'm Rob.

  • Neil: Now Rob, you like your food, don't you?

  • Rob: Oh yes, yum yum, food! One of my

  • favourite things.

  • Neil: And what do you think of street food?

  • Rob: I love street food. There are some

  • great places

  • in London where you can find delicious foods

  • from all over the world, cooked in front of

  • you in market stalls on the street.

  • Neil: It's quite new though, isn't it - not really

  • a British tradition.

  • Rob: I guess not, but it seems to be much more

  • popular these days.

  • Neil: Well our topic today is street food, but before

  • we tuck into that, here is today's question.

  • Recently archaeologists in Jordan

  • discovered what they believe is the oldest

  • remains of bread. How old is this bread? Is it:

  • a) 18,000 years old, b) 14,000 years old, or

  • c) 5,500 years old? What do you think?

  • Rob: I don't know - but what I do know is,

  • I wouldn't really want to try a sandwich

  • made from that bread!

  • Neil: Mmm, it might be a bit mouldy.

  • Rob: Yes! Anyway, I'm going to have a

  • guess then. I'll go for c) 5,500 years old.

  • Neil: Right, we will find out the answer

  • later in the programme. Mark Laurie is

  • from the Nationwide Caterers Association.

  • He is an expert in the business of street

  • food in the UK. He appeared on BBC

  • Radio 4's The Food Programme and was

  • asked how the business of street food

  • has changed in recent years. In his

  • answer he talks about the areas where

  • there is most growth in street food. What

  • are those areas?

  • Mark Laurie: It's been phenomenal the growth in street

  • food, it's really taken off, it's really

  • become quite mainstream. Part of the

  • cultural fabric of the country really, or it's

  • beginning to be, certainly in the bigger

  • cities and increasingly in the sort of

  • provinces, if you like.

  • Neil: So where does he say the popularity

  • of street food is growing?

  • Rob: He says that it's in the bigger cities

  • and also in the provinces. The provinces

  • is a word which means 'the parts of a

  • country outside of the cities'.

  • Neil: So essentially, he's saying it's getting

  • more popular everywhere.

  • Rob: Exactly. In fact he says the growth is

  • phenomenal.

  • This means he thinks the growth is

  • spectacular, really big.

  • Neil: Yes he says that it's really 'taken off'.

  • 'Taken off' is one of those phrasal verbs

  • that can be used in many different ways.

  • In this sense, when something takes off it

  • means it becomes successful and popular.

  • Rob: You know, street food isn't really something

  • you associate with Britain. Perhaps it's the

  • climate or British food - so street food is

  • something that we are now getting used to

  • and enjoying more. In fact Mark says

  • that it's now becoming mainstream. This

  • means that it's no longer something that is

  • seen as being unusual or different. It's

  • becoming an accepted part of the

  • everyday eating experience.

  • Neil: Well, let's listen again to Mark Laurie

  • talking about the growth of street food in

  • the UK.

  • Mark Laurie: It's been phenomenal the

  • growth in street food, it's really taken off,

  • it's really become quite mainstream. Part

  • of the cultural fabric of the country really,

  • or it's beginning to be, certainly in the

  • bigger cities and increasingly

  • in the sort of provinces, if you like.

  • Neil: Mark Laurie goes on to talk about

  • why street food has become popular.

  • What kind of food does he say it's not like?

  • Mark Laurie: Yeah, it's just really captured

  • the imagination of the public. It's honest

  • food, it's authentic food and it's people

  • that you can trust making it. It's not some

  • microwave food or whatever that you

  • might get in your local pub.

  • Neil: So street food is many things, but

  • what isn't it?

  • Rob: Well he says that it's not like food

  • you might get in some pubs. That food, he

  • says, may be some microwave food.

  • Which is food prepared in a microwave oven.

  • Neil: You know I quite like a microwave

  • meal now and then and I reheat my

  • leftovers in the microwave.

  • Rob: But I guess if you were paying for a

  • nice meal you wouldn't expect reheated

  • leftovers! I think the point he is making is

  • that in many places the food you are

  • served is not freshly made. It may be

  • pre-prepared and finished off in a

  • microwave. Street food, he says, is

  • authentic.

  • Neil: Yes, authentic. It's real, fresh and cooked

  • right in front of you and if it's food from

  • a particular country it's probably being

  • prepared by people from that culture.

  • Rob: He also says that this has captured

  • the imagination of the public. It's

  • something that the public have

  • experienced and thought - 'Yep, you know,

  • I like this, this is a great idea.'

  • Neil: Well, all this talk of food is making

  • me hungry, so let's get the answer to the

  • quiz and review today's vocabulary before

  • we head off and grab a bite to eat. We

  • asked about the age of bread discovered

  • by archaeologists in Jordan.

  • Was it a) 18,000 years old, b) 14,000 years

  • or c) 5,500 years.

  • Rob: Mmm, and I said c) 5,500 years old.

  • Neil: And I'm afraid it's a lot mouldier than that.

  • The answer was 14,000 years.

  • Rob: Very tasty I'm sure.

  • Neil: Yes! Right then, the vocabulary. We

  • started off with the adjective 'phenomenal' to

  • describe something that is amazing,

  • remarkable and extraordinary.

  • Rob: Then we had 'to take off', a phrasal

  • verb which means 'to become popular'.

  • Street food has really taken off in the UK:

  • it's become really popular.

  • Neil: And not just in the cities but also in

  • the 'provinces', which is a noun to describe

  • areas of a country that aren't the major

  • cities.

  • Rob: Something which 'captures the

  • imagination' is something which makes

  • you interested and not just for a short

  • time.

  • Neil: And one thing which has captured

  • the imagination of the British public is

  • authentic street food. Something

  • 'authentic' is real, it's genuine, it's not a

  • fake or a copy.

  • Rob: And finally we had 'microwave food',

  • food prepared in a microwave oven. And

  • that kind of food is not seen by some as

  • authentic.

  • Neil: Well, it's time to eat, so that's all we

  • have time for today. Join us again next

  • time and remember you can find us on

  • Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube

  • and of course on our website

  • bbclearningenglish.com. See you soon, bye.

  • Rob: Bye!

Neil: Hello. Welcome to 6 Minute English,

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 UK street food rob street microwave laurie authentic

Street food: Why is it becoming popular?

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    Evangeline posted on 2018/08/31
Video vocabulary