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  • Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook's F8 2018 Developer Conference Full Event- Subtitle & Transcript

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  • [Video clip: Why we build. We build because we see potential.

  • Because we see problems. Because we want to see what happens next. We build because we

  • are changing the world. And that can't be taken lightly. Because the opportunity to

  • change things for the better comes with the risk of making it worse. We build because

  • this last year was a hardFacebook�. Facebook under firethe FTC opening

  • we saw what happens when things go wrong. Privacy, security, data ownershipand learn

  • how important it is to get it right. We build because the most difficult problems

  • require us to solve them together. Because together is where progress can happen. Where

  • support is found. Where we understand overthrow and fall in much. Because together is where

  • our world gets better. That's why we keep building. Because this journey is still one

  • percent finished. � - Video concludes.]

  • Mark ZuckerbergCEO, Facebook Hi everyone. Welcome to F8!

  • This has been an intense year. I can't believe we're only four months in.

  • Before we get started, I just want to take a moment to say how much it means to us that

  • you're all here with us today. Now I know that it hasn't been easy being a developer

  • these last couple of months, and that's probably an understatement. But what I can assure you

  • is that we're hard at work making sure that people don't misuse this platform so you can

  • all keep building things that people love. And today I'm happy to share that we are reopening

  • our previews so you can all keep moving forward. Now I am looking out, and I see a lot of people

  • that we've worked with for a long time here, and a lot of people have traveled to be here

  • from around the world and a lot of you are building great tools that help people connect

  • in new ways. And I just want to take a moment upfront to thank each and every one of you

  • for all that you are doing to help bring the world closer together. Thank you so much.

  • Now we're all here because we're optimistic about the future. We have real challenges

  • to address, but we have to keep that sense of optimism too. And what I've learned this

  • year is that we need to take a broader view of our responsibility; it's not enough to

  • just build powerful tools. We need to make sure that they're used for good and we will.

  • And we're idealistic and we've always focused on all the good that connecting people can

  • bring and there's a lot of it. Just since the last F8, we've seen the me-too movement

  • on the march for our lives organized at least part on Facebook. We've seen people come together

  • after Hurricane Harvey to raise more than $20 million for relief, and we've seen more

  • than 80 million small businesses use these tools to grow and create jobs.

  • But we've also seen people try to use these tools for harm and that goes for Russia interfering

  • in elections for fake news, for hate speech, and for data privacy issues.

  • So we're investing a lot to address these issues and keep people safe, and I'm going

  • to go through all that head on in just a minute, because I think it's important that everyone

  • here knows exactly what we're doing to address them. But we also have a responsibility to

  • move forward on everything else that our community expects from us, too. To keep building services

  • that help us connect in meaningful new ways as well.

  • Safety and Security You know the hardest decision that I made

  • this year wasn't to invest so much in safety and security. That decision was easy, and

  • I just went to the people running those teams and asked them how much we could possibly

  • invest productively and then to transfer all those people to them. The hard part was figuring

  • out a way to move forward on everything else that we need to do, too.

  • You know, recently I was having a conversation about what Facebook stands for. What is that

  • basic idea that the world would lose if Facebook went away.

  • When I was getting started with Facebook back in 2004, what struck me was: you can go online

  • at that time and find almost anything, or you could look up any information; you could

  • fund new product; you could read news; you could download movies and music. You could

  • find almost anything except for the thing that matters to us most: people.

  • So I started building a service to do that: to put people first and at the center of our

  • experience with technology, because our relationships are what matters most to us. And that's how

  • we find meaning and how we make sense of our place in the world.

  • And we're not the only ones to build a communication service, but we are the ones who do it again

  • and again in all of the different ways that people want to interact online. This is our

  • DNA and we have built and grown service after service that put people and our connections

  • and our relationships at the center of the experience.

  • And we've come a long way. But when I look out today it still surprises me how little

  • of the technology that our industry produces is designed to put people first. Our phones

  • are still designed around apps and it's not what we think. And I believe that we need

  • to design technology to help bring people closer together, and I believe that that's

  • not going to happen on its own. And so to do that, part of the solution -- just part

  • of it -- is that one day more of our technology is going to need to focus on people and our

  • relationships. Now there's no guarantee that we get this

  • right. This is hard stuff. We will make mistakes and they will have consequences, and we will

  • need to fix them. But what I can guarantee is that if we don't work on this, the world

  • isn't moving in this direction by itself. So that is what we are all here to do. And

  • that's what I want to talk about today. I want to start by talking about keeping people

  • safe and then we're going to discuss all the things we're doing to keep building services

  • to help us connect in meaningful new ways. And I want to start today by talking about

  • protecting something that is really incredibly important to all of us and that is the integrity

  • of our elections. In 2016 we were slow to identify Russian interference.

  • We expected more traditional cyber-attacks like phishing and malware and hacking and

  • we identified those and notified the right people. But we didn't expect these coordinated

  • information operations and large networks of fake accounts that were now aware of.

  • So I sat down with our teams after this and we said we will never be unprepared for this

  • again. And since then there have been important elections like the French presidential election,

  • the German elections, the Alabama Senate special election last year and we've been more prepared.

  • We deployed new AI tools that successfully identified and took down tens of thousands

  • of fake accounts before they could do anything. We've traced the fake account network back

  • to Russia and taken down their network. We're doing more. We're requiring everyone running

  • political and issue ads or running large pages to be verified with a government ID. We're

  • making ads more transparent, so now you're going to see who is running a political ad,

  • who they're targeting, how much they're spending, and most importantly what other messages they're

  • sending to different people. That is a higher standard of transparency than TV ads and print

  • ads or anything else you will find on the Internet.

  • By the end of this year we will have 20,000 people working on security and content review

  • at Facebook. And we've created an independent election research commission, so independent

  • academics can give us ideas and hold us accountable to make sure that these systems work. And

  • this is an important election year, not only the big U.S. midterms that are coming up but

  • there are major elections around the world, in Mexico and Brazil. There are elections

  • coming up in India and Pakistan and more, and we are focused on this.

  • Beyond elections, we are focused on fighting fake news more broadly and there are really

  • three categories that we're focused on here. The first category is just spam. These are

  • people who aren�t ideological; they just want to make money; hocking the most sensational

  • junk that they can come up with to get you all to click on it. These are the people in

  • the �90s would have been sending your Viagra emails. And the playbook here is pretty simple,

  • right? It's to take down their ads on their site so they can�t make money, build tools

  • to detect and reduce the distribution to remove their economic incentive, and then eventually

  • they just go do something else to go make money, and you know we're starting to see

  • this. The second category is fake accounts. And

  • the idea here is less focused on looking at the content specifically and more focused

  • on trying to find bad actors and getting them off the network. So some of this is nation

  • states who are politically motivated like we talked about before. But all of this we're

  • fighting in the same way with AI tools with thousands of content reviewers and verifying

  • people who are running large pages and running sensitive ads.

  • Now the third category is people -- real people who are just sharing provably false hoaxes.

  • And the playbook here is building tools to get better at flagging content that is going

  • viral, so fact checkers can look at it so we can show it less. And for the people who

  • do see it to make sure that they see related articles that are more accurate that put this

  • in context that people can understand what's really going on.

  • So a lot of the work over the last year and a half has been bringing on more and more

  • fact-checking partners all around the world in different countries who speak all of the

  • different languages that we need to cover. So there's a lot more here to do, but these

  • are the three basic categories and we're making good progress on all of them.

  • Data Privacy I also want to talk about data privacy. And

  • what happened with Cambridge Analytica was a major breach of trust. An app developer

  • took data that people had shared with them and sold it. So we need to make sure that

  • this never happens again, so we're taking a number of steps here.

  • First, as you all know were restricting the data that developers will be able to request

  • from people. Now the good news here is that back in 2014, we already made a major change

  • to how the platform works to prevent people from sharing a lot of their friendsinformation.

  • So this specific situation could not happen again today. And since then we've taken a

  • lot more steps as well to restrict other data. But there are still more steps that we're

  • taking to do this even further with groups and events and the data available through

  • log-in to prevent future issues that might come up.

  • Second, we need to make sure that we find any other bad apps that are out there. So

  • were currently in the process of investigating every single app that had access to a large

  • amount of people's information before we made these big changes in 2014. And if we find

  • anything suspicious, we're going to bring in independent auditors to do a full audit

  • and if any data was misused, then we will ban that developer and we will tell anyone

  • whose data was affected. We've also started putting a tool in front

  • of everyone that shows them all of the apps that they are using and lets them easily remove

  • access to the ones that they no longer want to use. And with the GDPR coming up in Europe,

  • we're asking everyone around the world, not just in Europe, to review your privacy controls.

  • So to all the developers who are here, I know that the vast majority of you are focused

  • on building good things. We need to take these steps to make sure that everyone on our platform

  • is focused on building good things. And I believe that putting in these stronger protections

  • now will give you more ability to keep building for the long term.

  • Now I also want to share one new thing that we're working on with data privacy, and we

  • have a lot more updates like this coming. But this is an example of the kind of thing

  • that we are working on. In your web browser, you today have a simple way to clear cookies

  • and clear browsing history. And the idea is that a lot of sites need this data to work;

  • you need cookies, but you should have the ability to go in and clear your history at

  • any point you want. So we're working on a version of this for Facebook, too. It's a

  • simple control where you can clear your browsing history; what you've clicked on, the websites

  • you visited and so on. And we're going to call it clear history.

  • And we're starting with something that a lot of people have asked about recently and that's

  • the information that we get from websites and apps who are using Facebook's advertising

  • and analytics tools, so you can -- you're going to able to use this tool to see the

  • information about the apps and websites you've interacted with; youll be able to clear

  • all this information from your account and you'll even be able to turn it off having

  • this information stored with your account going forward.