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  • What's happening ladies and gentlemen, this is Minh from Architecture inspirations.

  • Today I'm gonna show you some tips and tricks for Sketchup Materials

  • and also some basics of Vray Materials.

  • Here's a list of what I'm going to cover in this video,

  • I will also provide timestamps for each section in the description box below,

  • so you can skip to any section you want.

  • With that said,

  • Let's get started

  • Number One, Applying materials

  • To start applying materials,

  • you need to use the Paint Bucket tool.

  • Now if you're new to Sketchup,

  • your setup might look a little different from mine

  • You might have the tools in different places,

  • but don't worry about that.

  • Just look for this icon,

  • or you can simply Press B for the Paint Bucket.

  • Your cursor will then change to a paint bucket,

  • and the materials window will pop up.

  • This window has a library of materials

  • that is included when you first installed Sketchup,

  • From here you can select whichever material you like

  • and click on a face or a group to paint it.

  • Number Two, Painting Groups/Components vs Faces

  • When you create a new element in Sketchup,

  • it will have a default material,

  • which is white for the front face,

  • and bluish purple for the back.

  • Painting a specific material to a face or faces will override that default material.

  • Also note that the default material can be selected here if needed.

  • When you have a group or component and you are painting it from the outside,

  • all of the faces assigned with the default material will change.

  • However if you edit it,

  • you can change the material of a specific face within that group.

  • Now if you exit the edit mode,

  • you can still change the group's default material

  • but any faces that are not assigned the default material will stay the way it is.

  • I've mentioned groups and components,

  • so what's the difference between them?

  • Well, I'm going to explain this by telling you a story

  • This is Steve

  • and his twin brother Jeff

  • my name Jeff

  • and their last name is Green.

  • And this is Bryan

  • and his twin brother Blake

  • Cooper

  • The difference between these two families is that the Coopers are telepathic.

  • Even though Steve and Jeff are pretty tight bros,

  • they don't have that connection.

  • So when Steve changes his shirt,

  • Jeff DOESN'T do the same.

  • But on the other hand, Bryan and Blake have that super power

  • so they know what each other are thinking,

  • so when Blake changes his shirt,

  • Bryan does the same,

  • now They have a connection

  • Since The Greens are groups,

  • and the Coopers are components.

  • This means that making changes to a group will NOT affect its copies.

  • On the other hand,

  • any changes you make INSIDE a component will affect all other instances of that component

  • However, any changes outside of it will not affect its copies.

  • In some cases, you want to create unique copies of a component

  • and stop it from linking to the original.

  • If so then you can select the one that you'd like to make unique,

  • right click it, then click Make Unique.

  • Now you can edit this component without affecting the original or vice versa.

  • This also works on multiple copies of that component.

  • For instance, I can make these two cars Unique,

  • so that they still link to each other, but not to the originals.

  • Number Three, Creating a material

  • To create a new material, first bring up the material window,

  • then click on this icon right here.

  • When you click this icon, a new window will pop up,

  • and you can choose a color using the Color Picker here.

  • If you want to use a texture, then check this box,

  • now you can locate and select the texture that you want to use.

  • You can also change the width and height of the texture here.

  • And the opacity of it here.

  • Number Four, Editing a Material

  • You can edit any existing material in the model by first selecting the material that you want to change,

  • and then go to edit mode.

  • Like the creating material window,

  • his has the same options where you can choose the color, texture,

  • and change its width, height and opacity to whatever you like.

  • The only differences between the edit mode and create mode are these two buttons right here.

  • One lets you sample the color on an object,

  • and the other lets you sample any color on screen.

  • So if I want these windows to have this green background color or this sky blue color for example,

  • then I can easily do so by using the two buttons.

  • Number Five, Importing Sketchup Materials

  • If you don't want to deal with sketchup's crappy default materials,

  • then here are some ways to import your own materials.

  • In a sense, Importing materials is a faster way of creating material

  • Method number one: The Import

  • First, Go to file, Import

  • Then select the texture/material that you want

  • Next, left Click on a corner of a surface to pick the anchor point

  • and Move the mouse to size it,

  • Finally, left click again to finish

  • Method number two: The Drag and drop

  • If you drag and drop a texture into Sketchup, it will come in as an image.

  • What this means is that you cannot do anything to it except move, scale, and rotate it.

  • See how I'm trying to sample the paint but Sketchup doesn't let me.

  • If you want to use it as a texture,

  • then just right click, explode,

  • and now you can sample and use it to paint your geometries.

  • Method number three: The Copy and paste

  • Another way is to copy and paste a geometry With the material from another model

  • For example I have a reference model on the left side,

  • and my new model on the right.

  • I can simply copy and paste the geometry with the material I want from one window to another

  • And now I can sample paint from there.

  • Number Six, Importing Vray Materials

  • To import Vray materials to sketchup;

  • first, press the M button on the Vray Toolbar to bring up Vray Material Editor.

  • Note that the Vray toolbar can be found here if it is not on your setup already.

  • Once you have the material editor opened,

  • Right click the Scene Materials,

  • Load material

  • and just locate and select vismats or vrmats files.

  • Once done, just select the material from the list and start painting away.

  • If you select the material and click here,

  • you can preview how the material will look once it's rendered

  • I'm going to bring up the paint bucket and test it out.

  • Well that's odd

  • it shows up black on the model space but it looks fine once rendered.

  • This is actually a small glitch that happens sometimes when Vray cannot locate the source of the texture.

  • If you just reload the texture file like so,

  • it will show up correctly in Sketchup.

  • Also, if you want to create your own Vray materials,

  • then this window is where you can do that.

  • I am not going to go over it today,

  • because that's a lengthy subject.

  • Also there are so many resources out there where you can get free vray materials.

  • Why spend time making something when you can just get it for free

  • Number Seven, Materials Resources

  • Speaking of free stuff,

  • here are some resources for Sketchup and Vray Materials.

  • You can pause the video right now and check them out

  • or go to the links in the description box below

  • We're more than half way through the video so I'm gonna get some water,

  • meanwhile, enjoy this time-lapse!

  • Welcome back!

  • Number Eight, Applying materials to Curved surfaces

  • Applying a texture to a curved surface is a little trickier than it is to a normal surface

  • Curved surfaces in sketchup are composed of many straight surfaces.

  • What does that mean?

  • For example, when you draw a circle,

  • you can actually see that it's made of many smaller segments.

  • So when it's extruded the circle becomes a cylinder that is made of smaller faces.

  • That's why sometimes when you import a 3D model to sketchup,

  • it might have a ton of unnecessary lines

  • which make it difficult and time-consuming to apply material to the object.

  • Not only that, it might affect the final results once rendered.

  • If you want to apply material to curved faces with hard edges like this,

  • you can first select all of the geometries

  • right click, soften edges, adjust the values a little,

  • and now you have a cleaner object that you can easily apply material to.

  • Number Nine, Repositioning Textures

  • Sometimes when you import or paint a texture,

  • it might not be at the right size or in the position that you want,

  • here's how to resize and reposition it.

  • Click on the face of the texture that you want to edit,

  • right click and go to Texture->Position.

  • Here, you will see 4 different pins.

  • Click on a pin to lift and reposition it.

  • Click and DRAG a pin will transform the texture in different ways.

  • The Red pin is the anchor and will let you reposition the texture

  • The Green pin is for Rotating and Scaling the texture proportionally

  • The Blue pin will shear and scale the texture in the direction you drag it

  • And the Yellow pin will distort the texture

  • Also, Right clicking will give you options to rotate, flip and reset the texture.

  • The fixed pins are very useful for applying a distorted texture to a surface.

  • What do I mean by that?

  • Let's say I want to apply this door material in this image to the object on the left,

  • but it doesn't show up correctly because the picture was taken at an angle.

  • To fix this, I first need to click on the material, go to texture, position.

  • Now right click again and uncheck Fixed pins.

  • Sketchup will now give you 4 generic yellow pins.

  • What you need to do now is move these pins to each corner of the door texture.

  • Now you can drag each pins to the corner of the geometry and boom, there you have it.

  • Number Ten, Uisng Projected Textures

  • Sometimes you may be dealing with surfaces that are more complex than a simple extrusion,

  • and it might affect the way your texture show up

  • Similar to this.

  • If that's the case, then you should consider using this method to paint that geometry.

  • First, create a surface that lines up with your curved surface

  • Now apply the texture and make sure it's positioned correctly

  • Right click and choose Texture-Projected

  • Then sample the texture and paint the curved surface again

  • Bam, fixed it.

  • Number Eleven, Replacing Materials

  • Let's say after you've applied materials to your the model,

  • and you realized that it doesn't look as good as you thought it would.

  • Now you're trying to figure out how to quickly replace all of these previously applied material

  • without doing it one by one by one by one again

  • Cause let's be honest here, ain't nobody got time for that sh*t.

  • There are a couple of ways to paint multiple faces at once

  • *Tip: make sure you do not have any faces selected when using these shortcuts

  • Ctrl+Click

  • All connected faces with matching paint will change

  • This will change all adjacent faces

  • Ctrl+Shift+Click

  • All faces in the SAME OBJECT with matching paint will change

  • This will paint all matching faces on the SAME OBJECT

  • Shift+Click

  • All faces in the ENTIRE model with matching paint will change

  • This will paint all matching faces in the whole model

  • Even though I said Shift+Click will paint all matching faces in the entire model,

  • this guy over here doesn't change, why is that?

  • It's because this object is a group so that the faces in there don't get affected

  • Number Twelve, Matching material positions to multiple Faces

  • Sometimes the positions of the same material don't match when it's applied to multiple faces.

  • To match their positions, simply bring up the Paint bucket,

  • then hold down Alt and left click to sample a face with correctly positioned texture.

  • Once you sample the material, apply it to the other faces.

  • You can also use the shortcuts from the previous tip to match material positions of multiple faces.

  • Number Thirteen,

  • Replacing Sketchup Material with Vray Material

  • Usually when I apply materials to a model,

  • I often use Sketchup materials from the start because it's more convenient.

  • But sometimes Sketchup materials do not render as well as vray materials

  • especially for glass materials such as this one.

  • So when I want to use vray materials in their place,

  • There's a very simple way to do that.

  • First bring up the paint bucket tool and hold down Alt

  • then left click the Sketchup material that you want to replace with Vray material.

  • Then go to Vray material editor

  • You will now see that material selected in the list.

  • Now right click and import the Vray material that you want to use.

  • You can then press the preview button to see what it will look like once it's rendered.

  • Number Fourteen

  • Applying a Material to a Layer

  • Sometimes when you import a model to Sketchup,

  • it might be organized by layers,

  • like this model that I've imported from Revit.

  • There's a trick that uses these layers as a way to apply materials to the model.

  • Let's say I want to apply a wood material to this layer

  • that consists of all the doors in the model,

  • I can first go to the Vray material Editor,

  • then select the material that I want to use,

  • right click, apply material to layer,

  • then select the Layer that I want and press OK.

  • Uhh okay, well Sketchup crashed, let's try it again.