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  • We've all been there, you wake up in the

  • morning and you feel dreadful. You don't

  • want to get up and you certainly don't

  • want to go to work.

  • So you could say I'm unwell, I'm ill, I'm

  • poorly, I'm under the weather,

  • I'm sick. You could also say I'm feeling

  • unwell, or I'm not feeling well, I'm

  • feeling poorly, I'm feeling ill, I'm

  • feeling sick. Now I'm feeling sick is a

  • little bit different to I'm sick. If you

  • say I'm sick

  • it suggests that your poorly or

  • generally unwell, but if you say I'm

  • feeling sick that may suggest that

  • you're feeling nauseous and might want

  • to vomit or throw up

  • so be aware of that difference

  • I'm sick in general, I'm feeling sick.

  • If you're feeling really unwell then

  • you may feel that you shouldn't go to

  • work in which case you would have to

  • call in sick or phone in sick.

  • Hi yeah it's Anna, i'm not feeling very

  • well today I don't think i can come in.

  • Sometimes people pretend to be sick in

  • order to get a day off work.

  • This is called pulling a sickie and it's

  • very naughty.

  • I've never done it ever ever ever.

  • Let's talk about the symptoms of

  • illness so the signs that you're sick.

  • Firstly you might have a pain in your

  • head

  • we call this a headache or if you have a

  • very serious headache you call it a migraine

  • If you have a pain in your ear

  • we call that earache. If you have pain in

  • your teeth then we call that toothache.

  • Toothache and if you have toothache you

  • would normally see the dentist not the

  • doctor.

  • Other symptoms in your head might be a

  • feeling of dizziness.

  • So you might feel dizzy, this is when you

  • feel unbalanced. You might even faint which

  • means you'll become unconscious or lose

  • consciousness.

  • Lots of people at this time of year

  • suffer with a cold or the flu and a cold

  • has many typical symptoms like...

  • Has anybody got a tissue.

  • Oh thank you. Coughing. If when you cough

  • stuff comes up, out of your throat, this

  • is called phlegm. Phlegm, and if you go to the

  • doctor with a serious cough they may ask

  • you what color is your phlegm. If you have

  • the flu and you might have the shivers. I

  • just can't stop shaking. Some people know

  • their unwell because they have a high

  • temperature, this means that they're very

  • very hot, more hot than normal and if you're

  • running a temperature that's very high

  • you may have a fever, this of course can

  • result in sweating.

  • Some people feel unwell in an emotional

  • way, so they could have mood swings or

  • feel very very down. The word for feeling

  • down is to be depressed. If your mood

  • changes regularly and we might say your

  • mood fluctuates or you have mood swings.

  • If your muscles tense up really tight

  • and you're not trying to make them tense

  • then this is called cramp. So you're

  • getting muscle cramp and some people

  • talk about getting up abdominal cramps

  • when they get pain in the muscles in

  • their tummy.

  • Sometimes you might have a problem with

  • flatulence which is also known as wind

  • or gas.

  • If the gas can't escape via the mouth or

  • the bottom then you may have trapped

  • wind which can be very uncomfortable and

  • a similar feeling to trapped wind

  • to feel bloated. If your nose is blocked

  • up and you have a pain here this is

  • called congested, to be congested and

  • people who are congested tend to sound

  • like this because the air can't pass through the

  • nose so they sound very nasal. And

  • it's very hard to understand what they're

  • saying when they sound nasal. I'm very

  • congested sorry, excuse me, sorry. If an area of

  • your body fills with fluid you will have

  • swelling so if you twist a joint the

  • joint might swell. So you'd say to the

  • doctor I have a swollen joint, a swollen

  • knee. Many people go to the doctor

  • because they get some form of rash and a

  • rash is unusual coloring spots on the

  • skin sometimes they're a bit itchy , sometimes

  • they're very red and blotchy, sometimes

  • it weeps and gives off a discharge this

  • means that fluid comes out of it.

  • Talking about fluid you may have to say

  • that you're bleeding in some way, you

  • might be bleeding from your private

  • areas, you might be bleeding from the

  • noses, from the mouth, from the ears; and

  • when you bleed you bleed blood. One of

  • the most unpleasant symptoms is to have

  • diarrhea also known as the runs, this

  • is when your stools or your poo is very

  • runny. Sometimes it's like water it's

  • very very uncomfortable. The opposite to

  • diarrhea is constipation.

  • This is when you can't go to the toilet

  • at all maybe for days and days and days

  • which is very unhealthy.

  • So when we're ill what do we do? The first

  • thing we do is look for sympathy. We tell

  • the people around us that we're not

  • feeling very well and hope that they will

  • look after us or take care of us,

  • this means they will make us tea bring

  • us food, and in the UK we tend to bring

  • grapes when people off unwell, and if

  • you're really poorly someone might bring

  • you flowers to cheer you up. A phrase

  • that we often use when giving sympathy

  • is oh dear, oh dear, it's just a

  • sympathetic expression.

  • Oh dear that's not very good, oh dear

  • that's not very nice at all, and this is

  • used for everybody,

  • men, women and children. Oh dear I'm sorry

  • to hear you're not well. We would also

  • wish the person a speedy recovery

  • so we say I hope you're feeling better

  • soon, get well soon.

  • Sometimes you might send a get well card

  • to wish them a speedy recovery and say

  • that we're thinking about them, on the

  • other hand we could be completely

  • unsympathetic, particularly if someone

  • who is a little bit under the weather is

  • putting it on or laying it on thick.

  • These phrases mean that they're being

  • melodramatic, they're making out like

  • their illness is much worse than it

  • actually is.

  • For example one phrase that we sometimes

  • use when we're ill is: oh I'm dying I'm so ill

  • I'm dying. When in fact they only have a

  • cold,

  • I mean come on. There is also a phrase in

  • the UK we use when a man is being

  • melodramatic about his cold and that is

  • the phrase man flu, so if a man has a

  • cold, a little bit of a sniffle, which

  • means he's got a runny nose,

  • we say - you got man flu have you?

  • Meaning it's not nearly as bad as they're

  • making out. They're just being melodramatic.

  • No I don't think Steve's coming tonight

  • yeah he's got man flu.

  • Exactly. The next step if you're not

  • feeling very well is to go to the

  • pharmacy to buy some medicine. Now the

  • medicine you can buy at the pharmacy without

  • a prescription from your doctor is

  • called over-the-counter medicine and

  • these are things like pain killers which

  • include paracetamol, ibuprofen, you can

  • also buy anti-inflammatories and