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  • - Watch out! (screaming)

  • Get it, 'cause watch, and we're doing watches today?

  • - How much watch would a which watch watch if a which...

  • - Watch which watch which would?

  • Alright, let's go watch some wood.

  • Oh my gosh. - Oh, shit.

  • - Today on Worth It: Lifestyle

  • we're gonna be trying three watches

  • at three drastically different price points

  • to find out which one is the most worth it at its price.

  • - Worth It!

  • I don't wear necklaces or rings or jewelry,

  • but I feel like a watch is where I can kinda express myself.

  • - Okay, in three words,

  • what are you looking for in your next watch?

  • - [Ben] Style, class, and function.

  • - I'm more of a comfort, style, of course, versatility.

  • You know, I got a lotta jackets, okay?

  • It's gotta fit the jacket.

  • Alright, it's time to go to our first location, ha!

  • (crickets chirping)

  • - Let's go!

  • - Hey, I'm Tim.

  • I'm a co-founder at Eone with Hyungsoo Kim,

  • and we create the Bradley timepiece.

  • - Hi, I'm Brad, and I'm Bradley from the Bradley timepiece.

  • - Hyungsoo, you're not being interviewed right now

  • because you literally have to leave at any point today.

  • Got ya, okay.

  • That's fine.

  • So, we'll let Tim tell your story.

  • So, this watch is for people with vision impairment,

  • but it's also for everybody.

  • Can you tell us a little about

  • the history of your company, Eone.

  • - We started out in Boston, Massachusetts.

  • My co-founder, Hyungsoo, was actually studying at MIT.

  • One of his classmates had a vision impairment

  • and he noticed that there really wasn't a good way

  • for him to tell the time during class,

  • and so, that was really the inspiration behind

  • tackling this issue of creating

  • a universally designed timepiece.

  • - I deployed twice.

  • Once to Iraq, once to Afghanistan, and unfortunately,

  • at the tail end of my Afghanistan deployment,

  • I actually stepped on one of those

  • hidden bombs in the ground.

  • I was unable to walk away from that blast with my vision.

  • I needed a medium through which to show the community

  • that I'm gonna be okay, and Hyungsoo comes and says hey,

  • you know, we're gonna start a company

  • that's gonna build a product for you.

  • - And, as you can see,

  • you would feel where the hour hand and the minute hand is,

  • but it's easily moved out of place.

  • - And if I move it,

  • it doesn't have any way to correct itself.

  • - Right. - Yeah, that's impossible.

  • - [Tim] We designed our timepiece

  • with the magnetic ball bearings.

  • We modified the hour and minute hand

  • so that there are magnets attached to them.

  • They are underneath the surface of the watch.

  • The outside indicates hours, face indicates minutes,

  • and if it gets knocked out of place,

  • you just shake your wrist

  • and it goes back to the correct time.

  • - That was to fix both of these issues where you have,

  • I mean, it's too loud or something that you can move easily.

  • - [Tim] Many of our watches have titanium cases

  • so they're super lightweight.

  • We PVD plate them.

  • We wanna make sure it's still scratch resistant.

  • - [Ben] What's the starting point

  • price wise for one of these?

  • - The starting point is around $260.

  • The high end that we have right now is 315.

  • So, we tried to price it at a really affordable price range.

  • - [Brad] One of the most compelling parts about this product

  • was that we're breaking down this boundary

  • between the able and the disabled with this design.

  • - We thought about this company

  • because it's a great looking watch.

  • Let's go onto the watch now.

  • - We got some braille, I noticed,

  • right on the front of this package.

  • It's a clean looking box. - It's beautiful.

  • It's like a sword. (swooshing)

  • Are you ready? - Let's do this.

  • Wow.

  • - My favorite part of unboxing is taking the plastic off.

  • Is that not satisfying?

  • - [Ben] That's a good looking watch right there.

  • It's my color palette, shades of gray.

  • - [Steven] I got the classic timepiece,

  • the one that was the original.

  • This is the cobalt, and the material is stainless steel.

  • - You can smell that genuine leather right there.

  • Don't eat it.

  • This is not a food video, Steven.

  • - The timepiece right here is beautiful.

  • The connection from the band to the timepiece,

  • you can see it moving very easily.

  • - Damn, that is a cool looking watch.

  • Whoa, magnets.

  • I mean, the overall feel, like the ceramic is smooth,

  • it's nice to the touch, but then the ridges are kinda sharp.

  • - This matches pretty much any outfit I have.

  • - I feel like a girl who just got her engagement ring

  • and wants to just pose with it in every picture.

  • - I'm gonna set your time.

  • - Okay. - And you're gonna tell me

  • what time it is. - Alright.

  • - Alright, tell me what time it is.

  • - It's like 6:10. - Close.

  • 6:15. - Yeah, I got it.

  • - Change my time.

  • You're really changing the time, huh?

  • It's 7:15?

  • - It's 7:19.

  • Close enough. - You would do that.

  • I am just mesmerized by these balls.

  • They're like those...

  • You know the balls that go back and forth?

  • (laughing)

  • Alright.

  • - Dude, the Bradley Timepiece, what's not to love?

  • It's an amazing story.

  • Bradley, American hero.

  • - This is the one thing I love about this show.

  • We're covering watches,

  • and we can talk about people with disabilities

  • and how the world has not been made easier for them.

  • Watch fact!

  • That's my radio voice.

  • So, bracelets with watches on them

  • came in and out of fashion

  • in around the 18th and 19th century,

  • but the way that they became trendy was World War I soldiers

  • would wear watches out of convenience.

  • - It was convenient compared to

  • looking at a clock at a building?

  • - [Steven] More like a pocket watch.

  • - Oh, okay. - I just realized something.

  • We have now gone back in time because we are now all

  • a part of the pocket watch movement again.

  • The iPhone. - No (bleep).

  • - I know!

  • - It just goes back to this whole concept of time

  • and us living on this continuum where

  • history just keeps repeating itself, you know?

  • - The sun has been here all along.

  • The O.G. pocket watch. (laughing)

  • Here we go, we're on our way to location number two.

  • It is this young, brilliant watchmaker

  • who has started a company called Weiss Watches.

  • - I'm Cameron Weiss.

  • I am the founder and master watch maker

  • at Weiss Watch Company.

  • - And you guys make watches right here in California.

  • - The majority of watches

  • are all gonna come from Switzerland or Asia,

  • so we're kind of an outlier here in the U.S.

  • - How does someone become a master watch maker?

  • - The master watch maker is someone

  • who could pretty much make or repair almost any watch.

  • Now, there's quartz watches

  • with batteries and electronic components.

  • A mechanical watch,

  • it's more about the craft of watchmaking,

  • keeping that tradition alive so a watchmaker in 100 years

  • could still go in and repair it.

  • - Can we talk about your watches and how you make them?

  • - The whole process of making a watch

  • really begins with paper, maybe sketching some things out,

  • and usually, I'm looking through historic timepieces.

  • Grant will then go through those