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  • Hi guys! We got a question from Christoph on Twitter.

  • Christoph.. xD

  • .. who linked an article on 9gag called, "25 Weird Things About Japan That Make You Say, " 'But Why?' ..

  • .. and asked us if it's true.

  • So, we're going to go through these things with you and let you know if they are in fact true.

  • Melons are seriously f****** expensive..

  • We have cheap ones too so..

  • Fruits really expensive here.. Yeah. but it's really good.

  • You might spend extra on strawberries but they're always going to be good strawberries..

  • ..and none of the like completely watered down no-flavor strawberries you might get sometimes in America.

  • How much does a melon actually cost?

  • It really depends, but the cheap one would be around ten bucks.. to twenty?

  • Japan loves coffee!

  • Japan imports approximately 85% of Jamaica's annual coffee production.

  • Actually, I don't know but it sounds like it's true and I like coffee. Who doesn't like coffee?

  • The fact is that everyone likes coffee. I would in fact import 85% of Jamaica's coffee production myself.

  • Because that's how much coffee I need to survive.

  • Japan's literacy rate is almost 100%

  • Yeah. Is that true? I think it's close to 100%

  • Do Japanese.. Is that like something common that Japanese know?

  • They're like, "Yeah, come visit us in Japan out literacy rate is a hundred percent!"

  • I don't know how I know. I think I learned it in school.

  • Part Two: Japanese are incredibly disciplined and devoted to education.

  • Are we? I don't know.

  • Is your education super important to you? Are kids like, "I really want to learn."

  • Some people are really like that but I wasn't.

  • I don't think it's that they're like devoted to education. I think it the way the system is set up here.

  • You have to study a lot, because you have to compete with other students to get into high school..

  • .. and then you have to compete to get into a good university, and to some people a good university makes or breaks your entire life.

  • So.. It's not that Japanese kids are like, "I really care about my education."

  • I think the majority of us go to school and study kind of hard because we had to. Yeah, I think they just have to.

  • You have to wear special shoes in the bathroom. Special shoes? You go to someones house they might have bathroom slippers.

  • Ah! Slippers.. Mhm..

  • We actually do have these slippers no one actually uses. My parents have one of these too and I've never used it.

  • You'll go to places that have them. You do not have to use the bathroom slippers.

  • Part Two: Many Japanese bathrooms don't have a separate area for the sower meaning the floor is often wet.

  • 00:02:20,320 --> 00:02:23,480 Floors? Yeah? Isn't it.. what's weird about it?

  • Okay so, if you come to Japan. The first time you're here. You're probably going to be in a cheap little apartment..

  • ..because you're studying abroad or you're an English teacher or something.

  • Which means that your toilet, shower, and sink, may all be in the same room.

  • You be like, "Oh, isn't that normal? That's what we do in America."

  • We DO do that in America but in Japan you shower outside of the bathtub.

  • So the floor of the room with the bathtub is supposed to get wet.

  • Because that's where you shower and the actual bathtub itself is for clean bodies, to soak in a tub and just relax; like a hot tub.

  • So, if you live in a cheap apartment, where they can't afford the space to separate the toilet and a sink from that room,

  • then everything might get wet. But otherwise in normal houses and halfway decent sized apartments,

  • like our apartment is small but we still have a separate toilet room. That's how it normally is.

  • Our sink is in a separate room as well. And the bathroom is just a room by itself.

  • With the bathtub and the shower outside of the bathtub and the whole thing is supposed to get wet.

  • Yeah, it's meant to be wet.

  • Young Japanese are increasingly interested in uneven or "snaggle" teeth, known as "yaeba."

  • Okay, from the first place. Yaeba is not uneven teeth. It's the specific. What was it called? Canine?

  • It's your canine. It's only the canine teeth. Canine teeth. Yeah.

  • There's the misconception that Japanese people think that crooked teeth are cute, but it's not.

  • Like, you can't go to Japan with like super messed up teeth and people will be like. "Kawaii!!"

  • Alright, it's just your canines. Yeah. Just the little fang teeth.

  • If those stick out then that could be considered cute.

  • If you watch anime and you see the characters that have the little fangs. They're not fangs, that's yaeba by the way.

  • 00:04:07,700 --> 00:04:09,600 The more you know.

  • Slurping is a good thing in Japan. It means the food is delicious and it's a compliment to the chef.

  • I wouldn't say it's a good thing. We just do it because that's how we grew up with.

  • and.. mhm compliment to the chef?

  • I don't know. I've never even heard of it. I don't think we slurp to show our appreciation to the chef.

  • 00:04:30,660 --> 00:04:33,020 When we eat, we just eat it like that.

  • So slurping noodles is something that just; It's never been negative in Japan.

  • So they're.. Or, some people say they slurp because it tastes better. There's.. yeah.

  • There's no issue with slurping noodles. So no one tries to stop themselves. So a lot of people do it just because that's tradition. Right?

  • Yeah.. yeah. Um, some people do it because they say it aerates the noodles and broth in your mouth.

  • Just like wine tasting. Like wine tasting, yeah. So it tastes better. So they say you should.

  • And you're supposed to eat noodles like ramen right away when you get it. When it's still hot. Before the noodles become soggy.

  • Because apparently that's bad.

  • So if you're trying to eat super hot ramen. You kinda can't help but slurp it a little bit.

  • So those are the reasons why they slurp.

  • It's not a compliment to the chef. That is.. I don't know why this is so wide spread.

  • I've looked this up in Japanese. Jun has looked this up in Japanese before.

  • There is nothing on the Japanese side of the internet. Where any Japanese person has ever said, "It's a compliment to the chef."

  • The only thing you will find if you look it up in Japanese is Japanese people responding to foreigners saying it's a compliment to the chef.

  • And they're like, "What are you talking about? No it's not."

  • If I want to say it's good. I just say it's good to the chef and that's how I always do.

  • It was oishikatta desu. That's what I just say.

  • Gochiso sama deshita! Gochisousama oishikatta desu.

  • KFC is the Christmas food of choice. Kentucky fried chicken?

  • Is that the Christmas food of choice? [Laughs] It is.

  • Like, around Christmas season when you turn on the TV. You see the KFC advertising all the time.

  • It's a thing. Yeah It is. It is.

  • Sticking your finger in someone's butt is a pretty normal thing to do. It's called kancho and kids do it on the playground.

  • Have you been kancho'd Jun? I actually have and it's freakin painful! Please don't do it! Please people.. don't.

  • The term kar·a·o·ke or karaoke means "empty orchestra."

  • Yeah. Yeah it does.

  • Cuddle cafes are a thing. What? What cafe? Soineya [Laughs]

  • Did you guys know we have cuddle cafes in America too? Really?

  • Look it up on the internet. [Laughs]

  • It's not like.. People say this about Japan. So they can be like, "Japan's so weird! Look what's normal over there!"

  • This is not normal. It's just a thing you can find. You can find it in America too.

  • Have you ever heard of anyone even mentioning cuddle cafes?

  • I've never heard of the word Soineya. [Laughs] I don't even know that existed.

  • There are no janitors in Japan's schools. Instead the kids clean up after themselves.

  • I'm sure some schools have janitors and some students don't have to clean up after themselves.

  • When I was in school I had to. Elementary school, junior high school, high school. I had to.

  • Do you have to clean everything? Are there no janitors to do any of it?

  • We.. I did have janitors but they clean specific places. Ahh okay. That students don't do.

  • Normally the way you clean changes. Depending on the week. It's like a rotation? Rotation.

  • I hated cleaning bathroom toilets. That's the worst spot. So you really have to clean, like?

  • What if there's a massive mess? What if people threw up in the bathrooms? Or diarrhea all over the place?

  • You don't have to explain what I did okay? [Laughs] Let's just go to the next question..

  • Japanese women used to dye their teeth black. Ohaguro? Yeah it's a thing. White teeth were considered ugly.

  • I don't know white teeth used to be considered ugly but ohaguro. The black teeth. It used to be a thing. Mmkay.

  • Falling asleep at work is a good thing. [Laughs] It means that you're working hard long hours.

  • Because sometimes people work for 19 hours a day. So it's encouraged for you to nap, on the job..

  • Maybe we should just sleep then? [Laughs] No.. If you're boss sees you sleep. You get in trouble.

  • The boss doesn't come around and be like, "Hey, Tanaka take a nap. You look tired."

  • Maybe some bosses might do. It all depends. Sounds like a nice boss. Yeah.

  • I would love this boss. I want that boss. [Laughing]

  • Black face is a trend in Japan. Black face? But it's not offensive. It's called ganguro and it was makeup.

  • Ohhh. Kinda died out a long time ago didn't they.

  • So, ganguro both started and ended in the '90s. [Laughs] It was '90s? This is no longer a thing.

  • Oh okay. Yeah, I think you can still find people who do it. Every now and then but it's not common.

  • It's not like.. I've seen (people) who get tanned really tan and brown but.. Yeah.

  • So it's called ganguro. Means black face but it's not black. It's like a dark orange. Mmm.

  • It's like a tan.. Like a fake tan.. Like a Donald Trump tan. [Laughs] Yeah it's not really around anymore.

  • Love hotels are popular here! Ah yes, very popular. Yeah they are. It's all over Japan.

  • Okay, here is the sad truth about Japan. If you are driving down the street and you see something that looks super awesome and amazing. Like you see a castle or something with all these lights.

  • You're like, "That looks like the amazing place in the world! I want to go there!"

  • It's either pachinko or a love hotel. [Laughing]

  • It's the most disappointing thing ever! She's not even (exaggerating.) No they have castles.

  • They don't even look like Japanese castles. [Crying]They look so amazing! I just want to go into a castle! Why does it have to be a love hotel?

  • It looks really magical. They are really popular and I think it's because a lot of people don't move out their families house until they get married.

  • and the walls are really thin at a lot of houses here. You can hear everything. No ones bringing their girlfriend back home to their house with their parents.

  • So you have to go to a love hotel.

  • Learning to prepare fugu is serious business. It takes eleven years of training to become a fugu chef.

  • The blowfish? Mhm. Uh, I don't think it will take eleven years to become a chef but it is a serious matter.

  • Unless you serve it properly you can kill people.

  • I know this because of The Simpsons. [Laughs] Jun told me before at some restaurants if you want to become a chef.

  • You have to do a lot of other duties first. So you spend years washing rice or washing dishes.

  • It's really common for a sushi restaurant. So like, if you want to train you have to prove yourself? He's like, "First wash this rice for five years."

  • I mean.. They don't tell you that but.. [Laughs]

  • Can you buy fugu yourself? I think so, or you can fish and just cook it yourself. If you wanted to.

  • You don't have to study for eleven years to catch fugu yourself? [Laughing] I mean eleven years.. No.

  • Japan has a big naked festival called Hadaka Matsuri. Yeah. It's all over Japan.

  • Actually yeah they have a bunch of them. They're all different.

  • We actually even made a video about this too. Yeah! We do. I really like the one we have the story is kind of cool.

  • There's a suicide forest called Aokigahara. I think that's true. I've never been there but I've heard of it.

  • Many Japanese men refuse to leave their rooms, it's called hikikomori.

  • [Laughing]Many Japanese men? I don't know exactly how many there are.

  • Yeah I mean in America the image of people who don't leave their houses is like someone who's agoraphobic.

  • So they have an actual phobia of being outside. I think this is more about people who are kind of like depressed and they just don't want to deal with life.

  • Okay Which is kind of easy these days. With video games and ordering food. I could totally see myself being a hikikomori.

  • If I wasn't afraid of death and trying to get the most out of my life as possible. I would totally just sit in my room and play video games and never leave it ever.

  • You can sleep in a capsule hotel. Yeah, it's a thing.

  • Raw horse meat called basashi is popular and a delicacy.

  • You can definitely eat raw horse meat in Japan. Especially at a izakaya. Mhm.

  • It's just a thing. It's food you can get here. One of the options. Yeah.

  • The worlds most expensive tuna fish was auctioned at Tsukiji for $735,000. [Laughs] Very expensive.

  • Jun.. Jun chef. Sensei.. Jun-sensei. Hai.

  • What makes a tuna fish worth $735,000? I think it's just a way to advertise the restaurant who bought the tuna.