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  • With the upcoming God of War for PS4, we see series protagonist Kratos taking on a new

  • mythological foe, so we here at Suggestive Gaming figured now would be a good time to

  • go over Kratos' first set of opposition: the greek pantheon.

  • So strap yourself in, because this is What You Need to Know about the entire original

  • God of War saga, from start to finish.

  • Our story begins with the Primordials, the very first beings to come into existence,

  • fighting for control of their creation, Earth.

  • This war ravished the world, and eventually the three Furies were born from the rage and

  • power of the battle.

  • The Furies were then tasked to honor oaths between the various beings of Earth.

  • Their first victim was the Hecatonchires, Aegaeon, who had broken an oath to one of

  • the first Gods, Zeus.

  • To make an example of Aegaeon, the Furies petrify his body into The Prison of the Damned

  • for anyone who dared to break an oath in the future.

  • Eventually the Furies began to take guidance from the God of War, Ares, who convinced them

  • to join him in a siege on Olympus.

  • Believing their forces to be too weak, the queen of the Furies, Alecto, birthed a son

  • with Ares hoping to create a powerful warrior.

  • This warrior, Orkos, proved to be a failure in Ares' eyes, and was disowned; however,

  • the Furies decided to use him as their oath-keeper.

  • With Ares still in search for his warrior to help take over Olympus, Zeus hears of a

  • prophecy foretelling his death at the hands of one of his sons, a 'marked warrior'.

  • Ares is tasked to find and dispose of this threat.

  • Ares discovers Deimos, a young Spartan who bore a birthmark all over his body, and storms

  • the city to capture him.

  • During the kidnapping, Deimos' brother, another young Spartan by the name of Kratos,

  • attempts to stop the God, but he is struck down, leaving a scar over his right eye.

  • Ares attempts to kill Kratos for this, but his sister, Athena, the goddess of war, convinces

  • him to spare the boy.

  • Deimos is then taken to the god of death, Thanatos, to prevent the prophecy and protect Zeus.

  • Kratos, tortured by his inability to save his brother, vows to never fail like that

  • again, and tattoos a replica of Deimos' birthmark on himself in remembrance.

  • Kratos' rage and pain remained with him as he became a leading member of the Spartan

  • army, eventually marrying a Spartan woman named Lysandra, and the two have a daughter

  • whom they name Calliope.

  • Calliope unfortunately contracts a plague, which infects her skin and causes the Spartan

  • authorities to decide for her to be thrown into a chasm and left to die.

  • Kratos then sets off to find the cure for her disease, a mysterious element with exceptional

  • healing abilities called Ambrosia.

  • Unbeknownst to Kratos, the Gods had a wager in which they selected various heroes whom

  • they believed would first obtain the Ambrosia.

  • Kratos was chosen by Ares, likely due to their prior run-in in which Kratos displayed his

  • resilience and bravery.

  • After battling the other Gods' selected heroes, Kratos fights a climactic battle with

  • an army of Barbarians and their leader Alrik, who was trying to retrieve the Ambrosia to

  • heal his own father.

  • Kratos eventually bests Alrik, and captures the Ambrosia, but at the cost of many of his men.

  • Upon returning to Sparta, Kratos heals his daughter, and the King of Sparta bestows on

  • him the title of Captain.

  • As captain of the Spartan army, Kratos leads his men to many victorious battles, often

  • slaying scores of enemies with an increasing hunger for power, despite the wishes of his

  • Eventually, Kratos comes across a familiar enemy, the barbarian king Alrik who still

  • blames Kratos for his father's death.

  • Kratos and his army are no match to the rebuilt Barbarian army, and Kratos, moments away from

  • death at the hands of Alrik, calls out to Ares in desperation.

  • Ares, seeing a candidate to overthrow Olympus, accepts Kratos's offer of loyalty, and kills

  • the Barbarians in exchange.

  • He then gives Kratos the Blades of Chaos, symbolizing his servitude to the God of War.

  • Under Ares' loyalty, Kratos slays many innocents, razes villages, and spreads chaos in the name

  • of Ares.

  • Under Ares' influence, Kratos slowly loses his humanity with every battle fought for

  • the god.

  • Soon, Kratos is tasked to raid a village of Athena's followers due to Ares' jealously

  • of Athena, whom their father Zeus favored.

  • There, he encounters an oracle, who warns Kratos of dark things awaiting him inside

  • the city's temple.

  • Kratos ignores this warning, and enters the temple, blindly slaughtering those inside.

  • However, afterwards, Kratos comes to realize that those inside the temple were none other

  • than his beloved wife Lysandra and daughter Calliope.

  • Ares reveals that he had transported them there secretly in order to sever Kratos's

  • human ties and create the perfect warrior.

  • Kratos leaves the bodies of his family inside the temple to burn, and as he exits, the oracle

  • curses him, binding the ashes of his wife and child to Kratos's skin, forcing him

  • to wear another reminder of his failures, and turning him into the Ghost of Sparta.

  • Kratos then renounces his allegiance to Ares, and breaks his oath, causing the Furies to

  • hunt him down and torture him with endless illusions.

  • Kratos then finds himself trapped in an illusion of his former home in Sparta.

  • Orkos appears before him and helps him break the illusion using Lysandra's necklace and

  • ring.

  • Orkos then convinces Kratos to seek out Aletheia, the Oracle at Delphi.

  • He finds the Oracle captured, but is unable to prevent her from being mortally wounded.

  • Before her death, she informs Kratos that the only way he can be free of his oath to

  • Ares would be to slay the oath's enforcers: the Furies.

  • Kratos returns to Orkos who informs him of Ares' true intentions all along to use him

  • to overthrow Zeus.

  • With this knowledge, Kratos travels to Delos to slay the Furies.

  • Upon his arrival, however, he is ambushed and captured by them, and they proceed to

  • torture him in the Prison of the Damned.

  • After two weeks of torture, one of the Furies leaves an opening for Kratos to exploit and

  • escape his imprisonment.

  • After various battles and illusions, Kratos is able to outsmart and outfight the Furies,

  • slaying all three of them.

  • After the death of the Furies, Kratos returns to his home in Sparta where he finds Orkos,

  • who reveals to Kratos that while he killed the Furies, they transferred Kratos' oath

  • to him, keeping the bond with Ares' intact.

  • Orkos hands Kratos his blade, and asks him for an honorable death in order to permanently

  • end Ares' hold on them.

  • Kratos complies, killing Orkos, and burning his home with the former oath-keeper's body still inside.

  • No longer under servitude to Ares, Kratos dedicates his life to serving the Gods of

  • Olympus as their trusted warrior.

  • After defeating an invading Persian army for the Gods, Kratos appears before them to ask

  • for his next task, suddenly, however, he sees the Sun fall from the sky, enveloping the

  • world in darkness.

  • Kratos follows the last trace of light he can see to the Temple of Helios.

  • After speaking to Athena, Kratos concludes that Helios had been captured, allowing the

  • God of Dreams, Morpheus, to entrance other Gods into a deep sleep, allowing him to take

  • control of Greece.

  • Inside the temple, Eos, Helios's sister, tasks Kratos to awaken her brother's Fire

  • Steeds in order to find him.

  • In return, she promises to relieve Kratos of his nightmares, which haunt him in the

  • form of a melody his daughter used to play on her flute.

  • He does this, and the steeds take him to Helios's location: the Underworld.

  • There, he meets, Charon, the ferryman on the River Styx, who ultimately denies Kratos passage,

  • as it is not his time.

  • Kratos engages him, but is knocked unconscious and thrown into Tartarus, the darkest depths

  • of the Underworld where the Titans had been chained by Zeus.

  • Upon waking, Kratos witnesses Atlas's chains broken, and the Titan missing.

  • Kratos fights his way through Tartarus, eventually climbing out to confront Charon once again.

  • After defeating him, Kratos uses his ferry to follow Helios's light down the river

  • Styx to a temple.

  • There, Kratos sees his daughter upon the shore.

  • He followers her inside, but instead finds Persephone, the Queen of the Underworld.

  • Persephone reveals to Kratos that he can meet his daughter once again, and she is now residing

  • in the Elysium Fields.

  • Persephone tells Kratos that to see his daughter again, he must make a sacrifice; to give up

  • all of his weapons and powers given to him by the Gods.

  • Kratos does this, transferring his powers into the Forsaken Tree, and regains his humanity.

  • He reunites with his daughter, but the reunion is interrupted by Persephone, who reveals

  • her true intentions.

  • She reveals that it was her who released Atlas, whom she tasked with destroying the pillar

  • that holds the Earth.

  • She intends for this to kill everyone, including herself, to free her from her imprisonment

  • by Hades as his wife.

  • Kratos painfully makes the decision to give up his ability to see his daughter and re-gain

  • his weapons from the tree.

  • Doing this, he once again becomes the Ghost of Sparta, and against his daughter's wishes,

  • takes off to stop Persephone.

  • Kratos finds the Queen at the base of the pillar, and she carries him to the top.

  • There, the two engage in a final battle.

  • During this battle, Persephone attempts to confuse Kratos and convince him to return

  • to Elysium to be with his daughter.

  • Kratos resists this, however, and Persephone orders Atlas to take care of him.

  • Atlas does not get this chance, however, as Kratos chains the Titan to the ceiling of

  • the Underworld and returns to Persephone, besting her in battle and killing her.

  • Her body explodes, destroying the pillar and leaving Atlas the only thing holding the world

  • together.

  • Atlas, though defeated, taunts Kratos, as he remains a slave to the Gods.

  • Kratos accepts this fate, as he can only hope that serving the Gods will cause them to free

  • him from his nightmares.

  • Atlas then predicts to Kratos that they will meet again before Kratos leaves to return

  • Helios to the sky.

  • Weak, and now knowing that his sins will never allow him to see his daughter again, Kratos

  • falls from the chariot, landing on a cliff overlooking the Aegean Sea.

  • Some time after waking, Kratos is sent into the sea to kill a Hydra and return peace to

  • the waters.

  • After doing so, he is approached by Athena, who asks Kratos to save her city, Athens,

  • from her brother Ares, whose army is currently advancing.

  • Kratos, seeing an opportunity to get revenge on Ares, agrees on the condition that the

  • Gods free him of his nightmares once and for all, as well as offer him a chance at redemption.

  • Kratos enters Athens to find the town's Oracle, who tells him that in order for the

  • mortal to defeat a God, he must seek the power of Pandora's Box, which is locked inside

  • a Temple, constructed on the back of the Titan Cronos, who Zeus cursed to wander the Desert

  • of Lost Souls for eternity.

  • Kratos makes his way to the temple, encountering a mysterious grave digger on the way.