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  • What's up, guys?

  • Jeff Cavaliere, ATHLEANX.com.

  • We've hit the outer chest, we've hit the lower chest, and today we're hitting the

  • upper chest.

  • More than any other opportunity here, you're going to have a great chance to get at this

  • area because our anatomy is going to favor that.

  • What I'm talking about is, when it comes to the upper chestwe break out the muscle

  • markers here, guys, to put the science back in strength, and we're also breaking Jesse

  • out a little bit, to show off some new gains.

  • But that will be a moment from now.

  • You can see that the clavicular portion of the chest comes off the clavicle and runs

  • down in this direction.

  • Separate than the rest of the chest itself.

  • It actually separately innervated that allows us to actually target this area a little bit

  • better than any other area of the chest.

  • But what we really want to do, as always, is follow the fibers.

  • What that means is, if we can take our arm and move it in the direction that the fibers

  • run, at the same oblique angle, then we know that we can hit this upper chest a lot more.

  • That means we can take a strategic approach to the exercises that we do.

  • Look, even if you look at the incline bench-press you can see that it's following the fibers.

  • It's taking the arm through that range of motion.

  • If you're not sure, if you think you're pressing at an oblique angle, or if you're

  • pressing straight overhead, when you sit upif you've kept your arm in the same

  • positionyou can see that it ends in that same position that you would if you followed

  • the fibers and ended up here.

  • So, we can do that with more than an incline bench-press.

  • I know you know that exercise.

  • I've got a lot of others for you here, including bodyweight options, that are going to allow

  • you to really hit this area hard, once and for all.

  • First up is actually a variation of an exercise that I've covered for you on this channel

  • before.

  • That's the UCV raise.

  • We're doing that with a dumbbell.

  • You can see when we do this exercise we're, yes, following the fibers.

  • Moving in that preferred movement pattern.

  • But we can actually take this and make it one step better because we can do this two

  • arms at a time with a cable setup like you see me doing here.

  • Now, this is actually taking advantage of a PNF movement pattern.

  • A principle based in physical therapy that allows our bodies to move as it's neurologically

  • preferred to move.

  • Which is good news when you're trying to get better recruitment of these upper chest

  • fibers.

  • So, what we do is have our arms out at our sides, a little bit away from the body, and

  • as we pull up we're getting that mimic of that movement pattern, but also we have the

  • opportunity to cross the arms at the top, get the adduction we need to get a full chest

  • contraction, and make this a great exercise.

  • You'll see as Jesse's doing this exercise here, the one thing you really want to focus

  • on is, as you come up and pull your arms across, into that adduction you don't want to let

  • the chest cave in.

  • You want to simultaneously stick the chest out as you cross, and go for that really good

  • contraction every, single time.

  • Next up we can put an advanced twist on a classical exercise that's known more for

  • hitting the lower chest.

  • That's the dip.

  • You can see as Jesse's doing it here, this dip is effectively targeting the lower pecs.

  • Why?

  • Because it's following the fibers, once again, hitting that abdominal head here, as

  • we've talked about before, in our lower chest solution video, which is this video

  • over here.

  • If you haven't seen it, guys, I will do you a favor and link it for you at the end

  • of this video.

  • But we know that we can go the opposite direction.

  • There is a way to do a dip, but to get those arms up in that preferred position, following

  • the fibers up top, we can do that.

  • But like I said, it's hard.

  • You can see as I back myself into a wall here and walk my feet up the crucial thing is keeping

  • my arms up overhead, away from my body.

  • Now as I get into this position I try to mimic a dip holding onto those dumbbells so I have

  • the same feeling in neutral position on my wrists to come down every, single rep, and

  • try to push myself back up.

  • Again, this is not easy, but as you come around the front you can see I'm really trying

  • to squeeze.

  • If you could, if you have the ability to roll the dumbbells ever so slightly toward each

  • other to get a little more of that adduction that you can't do on a stationary dip station

  • here.

  • The fact is, this is definitely a tough exercise option here when it comes to training your

  • upper chest.

  • But if you're up for the challenge it's definitely worth it.

  • Sticking with the bodyweight options we actually have another exercise that's slightly easier,

  • but no less effective when it comes to hitting that upper chest.

  • This is the push away pushup.

  • The key here is the initial position of the arms.

  • You want them, not vertically, right beneath your chest, but out in front of you a little

  • bit.

  • As I go down into each rep the idea is when I push my body back up it's not just up,

  • but it's up and back so I'm following the direction of those arms and allowing my

  • chestmy upper chest in particularto work here.

  • But it's not just that.

  • I actually try, as I press up, to not just push, but actually squeeze.

  • So I'm trying to visualize squeezing my biceps together to get an intense contraction

  • here, a little bit of that feel of the adduction as I press away.

  • If this is a little bit too difficult for you, you can do it with a little bit of a

  • shortened position here by just hiking your butt in the air as Jesse's doing, and just

  • doing a pike pushup, or an incline pushup.

  • Again, with the arms positioned a little bit in front of your body it's going to allow

  • you to target more of that upper chest here.

  • Regardless of which version you use.

  • The next one here is one I actually love.

  • It's not just for the versatility of it because you could just do it with a single

  • band, but also because you're actually getting the contraction on that upper chest, coming

  • both from below, and once again at the top.

  • We call this a sunrise sunset.

  • You can see why.

  • We start in this sunrise with the arms moving up, but most importantly, what are they doing?

  • They're following the fibers.

  • They're coming from the low, outside position, up and toward each other at the top.

  • When you get that contraction, you can easily see the upper chest handling a lot of the

  • load here.

  • But when you come back and reverse the direction, come all the way out to the side, loop around,

  • and come back down, and we dive in from the top.

  • This is actually mimicking what an upper chest dumbbell pullover would look like.

  • I've covered that exercise before, too.

  • That one didn't even make this video and I love it.

  • So, it goes to show you how many options we actually have.

  • The key though is, because we're driving our arms down it's finishing in the contracted

  • position with them angled up, into this position right here.

  • At the same time, it's getting all that added internal rotation of the arms that can

  • intensify the chest contraction as well.

  • So, you're hitting it at the top, you're hitting it from the bottom, but most of all,

  • you're definitely hitting the upper chest.

  • And that gives you another option here, no excuses, that you can do at home with just

  • a single band.

  • This next exercise actually gives us the option of using heavier weights because we're going

  • to shorten the range of motion and shorten the moment arm that will allow us to compensate

  • with heavier weights.

  • We can load up this upper chest more effectively this way.

  • I actually showed you something we could do that did the same thing in the past with an

  • exercise called the Cavaliere Crossover.

  • We didn't really focus on moving the entire length of the arm but shortening our focus

  • to just the elbow up.

  • We can still move it up, and across our body as you see me doing here in the crossover.

  • We can still get that lift.

  • Now we can make this better by using cables that can actually use a more consistent line

  • of force here because the cables do what the dumbbells don't.

  • Dumbbells are more subject to gravity.

  • Cables can actually follow our movement all the way up.

  • What we can do here is shorten that moment arm so we can load the weights up and really

  • shorten the motion itself.

  • Watch as I actually get my arm nice, and tight.

  • We call these upper cuts, for obvious reasons.

  • All I'm trying to do is drive my elbow up from its position at my side, up until it's

  • in front of my chest.

  • You can see that's getting a nice contraction on that upper chest area because we're doing

  • what we were trying to do in the first place.

  • That is, drive from that down, and out to up, and in position, just as we have with

  • every, other exercise here.

  • But we can do it in a very small, but intense way.

  • This next one is a great one.

  • This is actually going to take the incline bench-press and add one, small tweak to it

  • that will make it infinitely better.

  • All we have to do is start using cable.

  • We're going to sit at the end of a bench, like you see me doing here, and I'm just

  • going to lean back a little bit.

  • About 20, or 30 degrees.

  • We call this the lean back press.

  • Pressing from this position by itself, we know, would hit the upper chest.

  • Why?

  • Because we're putting our arms into that position that we're trying to get to in

  • the first place.

  • But look what we have going on here with the cables.

  • We actually have forward resistance from the cables.

  • They want to pull me down, and forward.

  • Those arms down, and forward.

  • So, what do I have to do?

  • I have to resist and pull back.

  • So I'm actually driving my arms up, into this position against resistance instead of

  • what we do with dumbbells alone, where they're only being acted upon by gravity.

  • Straight up and down.

  • There is no forward, or back component here that the cables are allowing us.

  • Jesse will demonstrate here what you don't want to do.

  • That is, not leaning back.

  • Obviously, we call it the lean back press for a reason, but Jesse wasn't listening.

  • Actually, what he's doing here is just showing you the fact that when you do this, you've

  • now shifted that focus away from the upper chest a little bit too high.

  • Now we're right up on top to the shoulders, which we know would happen if you're doing

  • a straight vertical press.

  • You really lose the benefits of that pull, that forward pull, from the cables themselves

  • by doing that.

  • So, you want to make sure that you're following the name itself.

  • Lean back just a little bit and try it.

  • I promise you're going to feel this more than you might have felt on any other incline

  • dumbbell bench-press you've done before.

  • Next up we have an athletically explosive option here for training our chest.

  • Yes, it's possible.

  • You don't always have to pin yourself down on a bench whenever you want to train your

  • chest.

  • You can actually get up on your feet as you see me doing here.

  • Being on your feet is the first step to being athletic.

  • What we do is get ourselves into a split stance here, so we have more balance and stability

  • for, what?

  • For being able to push more explosively.

  • Load up the weights here and really drive and accelerate them.

  • These are the jammers.

  • I'm not saying everybody has access to this jammer machine at your gym, or maybe even

  • have access to something that does something similar to this.

  • The idea is, if you do; take advantage of it.

  • Use this because, what is it doing?

  • It's training your upper chest here, if you follow the right alignment of your body.

  • I'm getting here and I'm pushing from down at chest level, up, and out.

  • If you sit down like Jesse's doing here to do this and you press straight up, you've

  • dramatically changed the focus once again.

  • You've shifted that focus from the upper chest a little bit upward, to the shoulders

  • that's not going to allow you to do this.

  • I wouldn't even say that you could be very explosive from here because once again, you've

  • taken the feet and legs out of it.

  • You've sat on your ass and taken out that athleticism.

  • Here I actually saved the best for last, or at least my favorite.

  • This is the landmine rainbow.

  • Before you think it sounds all sweet, and nice it's actually a killer when it comes

  • to training your upper chest because the landmine does something very unique.

  • It allows us to do this arcing motion very smoothly because the bar itself, by virtue

  • of being in the landmine, is going to allow for that nice, arcing motion.

  • What we want to do, if we're going to do this right, is avoid first and foremost, what

  • Jesse's doing here.

  • Sorry, Jesse.

  • I had to do it to you again.

  • What we're doing is avoiding the fact that we don't want to have the torso rotate with

  • the arm as the arm drops down to the side.

  • We don't want to keep the arm in a shortened position here because this is one of the exercises

  • that we're trying to increase that moment arm, and keep the arm moving nice, and long.

  • Take advantage of the arc that the landmine provides.

  • What you'll see is, the arm is literally following that same pattern that we want.

  • Literally following the fibers of the upper chest all the way up to the top.

  • Once we get up there we get that brief contraction and squeeze, and we switch hands hitting that

  • upper chest on the other side eccentrically, and then driving it back again concentrically

  • back on the way up.

  • So, you're alternating left and right.

  • The fact is, this will feel so smooth to you, but at the same time challenging.

  • You're probably not going to need a lot of weight here.

  • I promise you.

  • You might even use just the bar itself, but it's a great way, especially as a finisher,

  • to really wrap up your upper chest training.

  • So, there you have it, guys.

  • There are at least eight exercises, if not 10, that could be your cheat-sheet when it

  • comes to training your upper chest because there is a way to hit it, guys.

  • If you remember nothing elseit's what we've been saying all video longit's