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  • I'm dreaming of a white Christmas.

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Dreaming, what am I dreaming about?

  • Well, this lesson, to be honest.

  • I'm trying to find a way that would be easier to have difficult conversations.

  • It's a dream, but it's a dream I'm going to help you turn into a reality.

  • Today what we're going to look at is nine words... ten words to give you to use in conversations

  • that you might find difficult in English that no one else has given you.

  • I will give you some situations that you could use these words in, and then we're going to

  • play, have a little bit of fun.

  • Okay?

  • It's something you can do by yourself, you can do it with a friend, or a group, and it

  • will help you become more creative and a lot better with English, more like a native speaker

  • because you'll understand what these words are and how to use them appropriately.

  • Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • As E says, these are difficult conversations.

  • There are many different types, from relationship and work, so we're going to have a bit of fun.

  • And I'll start off with the words first.

  • Let's look at the word "confess".

  • When you confess something it means you must give the truth or tell the truth about something,

  • something that someone hasn't known, you will have to tell them.

  • Right?

  • I have to confess that I like yellow and I'm wearing yellow underwear.

  • You didn't know, it's hidden, but now you know.

  • "Resolve", it means to find a way.

  • If you resolve to do something, you want to resolve, you have decided to do something

  • and you've got a strong...

  • A strong desire to do it.

  • A resolve to lose 15 pounds means I've made a promise to myself to work towards that to do that.

  • "Regret".

  • Regret, you say you're sorry, and it means I feel bad about it.

  • When you regret you wish you didn't do it.

  • I regret breaking off with a girlfriend five years ago because she would have made the

  • perfect wife.

  • I regret.

  • "Condolences", use this one what we call sparingly, which means don't use it a lot.

  • Condolences...

  • Or the word "condolence" is usually reserved for death.

  • Okay?

  • So, when you say "condolence", if you say: "I give my condolences", you wouldn't say

  • that if someone lost their job.

  • "Oh, you lost your job?

  • My condolences."

  • They're not dying.

  • They just don't have work.

  • Okay?

  • They have a future.

  • But if you hear someone is really sick, they have cancer, serious cancer or their parent

  • or someone that they know has died, then you would say: "I offer my condolences."

  • You can even use it for a pet, if their dog that they've had for ten years has died, offer condolences.

  • It means I'm extremely, extremely sorry that this has happened to you.

  • Okay?

  • "Empathize".

  • "Empathy" is to feel like someone else.

  • "Empathize" is to...

  • We can understand and have...

  • Share the emotion with you.

  • We have that empathy.

  • And I say, I see a poor person on the street, and someone says: "Look, they're lazy."

  • I go: "Can't you empathize?

  • Imagine what it would be like.

  • Feel what they feel."

  • "Mend".

  • "Mend" means to fix, fix something.

  • You want to mend it.

  • You can mend a relationship.

  • If you're fighting: We need to mend this relationship.

  • All right?

  • We need to make it better, fix it.

  • If you break your arm and it's fixed, the arm is mended, you go your arm will mend;

  • fix.

  • I like "disillusion".

  • "An illusion" is something you think is true, but it's not.

  • It's an illusion.

  • Magic tricks.

  • Here you go, here it's gone.

  • Whenever I go like this, there's the illusion that I've been standing here waiting for you

  • to come back.

  • Right?

  • It's all cameras.

  • To be disillusioned is to believe something was true and you find out it's not true anymore.

  • You think your mother or father is the greatest person on the planet, and then you find out,

  • just like you, they have flaws or weaknesses, and they make mistakes.

  • And you're like: "But I thought you were perfect."

  • You had become disillusioned.

  • They weren't perfect or they are not perfect.

  • "Consider".

  • Consider this.

  • Think.

  • And if you know the song I was trying to sing, REM.

  • Anyway, consider, think about something.

  • "I need you to consider", to think about.

  • "Impact", bap!

  • How something affects something else when it hits it.

  • Bullets have an impact-boof-they hit you.

  • Whoa.

  • There's impact, it affects your body.

  • Okay?

  • What is the impact?

  • When this change happens, what will happen?

  • Impact, there's impact to it.

  • "React".

  • "Act" is action, "react" means back or again.

  • So, if somebody pushes you, how do you react?

  • What do you do back?

  • Okay.

  • How do you react?

  • Or if you won a million dollars, how do you react?

  • You've got information, give information back out.

  • Like, I won a million: "Woo-hoo!

  • I'm rich!"

  • Okay?

  • And here's a word: "acknowledge".

  • If you look carefully in there, there's the word "know".

  • When you acknowledge we have to say: "We know this is true."

  • We know this is true.

  • We acknowledge this person to be a great citizen.

  • We're saying we know it's true that they're a great citizen.

  • And before I go further, I have to acknowledge: Horae!

  • And I'm not saying the word.

  • Her name is Horae who gave me this beautiful shirt from Africa.

  • Thank you.

  • You can get one, too; just go to Africa.

  • Otherwise, this is mine.

  • Thank you, Horae, for this shirt, and I'm proudly wearing it on engVid, so I hope you

  • get to see this video and go: "I gave him this shirt", and yes you did.

  • Horae Ba gave me this shirt.

  • Thanks, Horae.

  • Okay, anyway.

  • So, difficult conversations.

  • I've taught you some words, gave you some, you know, vocabulary, and you're like: "Great,

  • I have vocabulary, but how is that a conversation?"

  • Well, here's where we're going to use our imagination and creativity.

  • If you're by yourself, you can make a speech.

  • And I might recommend that you take two words or three words, definitely one word and try

  • to speak to someone using it, and you would pretend that this person would be here.

  • So, in this case, E will be my person.

  • So you can draw your own little Mr. E on your paper, and put E out there and you can talk

  • to E. Or if you have a friend you're sitting beside, you can go: "Okay, I'm going to pretend

  • to be the parent, and you'll be the child.

  • I'll be the president, you'll be the citizen.

  • I'll be the man, you'll be the woman."

  • I will be the man, you can be the woman.

  • I'm not going to be the woman.

  • Okay.

  • Ready?

  • So let's do the first one.

  • So, the first thing you would do is you would say, here's the situation: Our president has

  • to tell his/her people that his/her...

  • I know this is complicated, but just I'll do it one way and then you'll get it.

  • Okay?

  • A person has to tell his people that his government cannot help them in an emergency, or a president

  • has to tell her people that her government cannot help them in an emergency.

  • By the way, that's the proper way to write in English.

  • If you have to do that, a lot of times we put "them" or "their" to make it easier, but

  • I just want to give you an example where it's supposed to be written correctly, both genders

  • indicated to show that it could be a man or a woman.

  • Back to the lesson.

  • Okay, so a president has to tell their people that, or tell his or her people that there's

  • a problem.

  • So, here we go.

  • How many words, what do you think, E?

  • I think I have to use, what?

  • Okay, four...

  • Okay, I have to use four words, here we go.

  • My American people, I stand before you today and I regret having to tell you that there

  • is an emergency in the State of the Union: Donald Trump's President.

  • I mean: There's an emergency in the State of the Union.

  • I would like to give my condolences to those people who have been affected by this situation.

  • We are trying to empathize with the pain you may be going through, and we hope to mend

  • our nation as