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  • So, I'm an artist.

  • I live in New York, and I've been working in advertising

  • for -- ever since I left school,

  • so about seven, eight years now,

  • and it was draining.

  • I worked a lot of late nights. I worked a lot of weekends,

  • and I found myself never having time for all the projects

  • that I wanted to work on on my own.

  • And one day I was at work and I saw a talk

  • by Stefan Sagmeister on TED,

  • and it was called "The power of time off,"

  • and he spoke about how every seven years,

  • he takes a year off from work so he could

  • do his own creative projects, and I was instantly inspired,

  • and I just said, "I have to do that. I have to take a year off.

  • I need to take time to travel and spend time with my family

  • and start my own creative ideas."

  • So the first of those projects ended up being

  • something I called "One Second Every Day."

  • Basically I'm recording one second of every day of my life

  • for the rest of my life,

  • chronologically compiling these one-second

  • tiny slices of my life into one single continuous video

  • until, you know, I can't record them anymore.

  • The purpose of this project is, one:

  • I hate not remembering things that I've done in the past.

  • There's all these things that I've done with my life

  • that I have no recollection of

  • unless someone brings it up, and sometimes I think,

  • "Oh yeah, that's something that I did."

  • And something that I realized early on in the project

  • was that if I wasn't doing anything interesting,

  • I would probably forget to record the video.

  • So the day -- the first time that I forgot, it really hurt me,

  • because it's something that I really wanted to --

  • from the moment that I turned 30, I wanted

  • to keep this project going until forever,

  • and having missed that one second, I realized,

  • it just kind of created this thing in my head

  • where I never forgot ever again.

  • So if I live to see 80 years of age,

  • I'm going to have a five-hour video

  • that encapsulates 50 years of my life.

  • When I turn 40, I'll have a one-hour video

  • that includes just my 30s.

  • This has really

  • invigorated me day-to-day, when I wake up,

  • to try and do something interesting with my day.

  • Now, one of the things that I have issues with is that,

  • as the days and weeks and months go by,

  • time just seems to start blurring

  • and blending into each other

  • and, you know, I hated that,

  • and visualization is the way to trigger memory.

  • You know, this project for me is a way for me

  • to bridge that gap and remember everything that I've done.

  • Even just this one second allows me to remember

  • everything else I did that one day.

  • It's difficult, sometimes, to pick that one second.

  • On a good day, I'll have maybe three or four seconds

  • that I really want to choose,

  • but I'll just have to narrow it down to one,

  • but even narrowing it down to that one allows me

  • to remember the other three anyway.

  • It's also kind of a protest, a personal protest,

  • against the culture we have now where people

  • just are at concerts with their cell phones out

  • recording the whole concert, and they're disturbing you.

  • They're not even enjoying the show.

  • They're watching the concert through their cell phone.

  • I hate that. I admittedly used to be that guy a little bit,

  • back in the day, and I've decided that the best way

  • for me to still capture and keep a visual memory of my life

  • and not be that person, is to just record that one second

  • that will allow me to trigger that memory of,

  • "Yeah, that concert was amazing. I really loved that concert."

  • And it just takes a quick, quick second.

  • I was on a three-month road trip this summer.

  • It was something that I've been dreaming about doing my whole life,

  • just driving around the U.S. and Canada

  • and just figuring out where to go the next day,

  • and it was kind of outstanding.

  • I actually ran out, I spent too much money on my road trip

  • for the savings that I had to take my year off,

  • so I had to, I went to Seattle and I spent some time

  • with friends working on a really neat project.

  • One of the reasons that I took my year off was to spend more time with my family,

  • and this really tragic thing happened where

  • my sister-in-law,

  • her intestine suddenly strangled one day,

  • and we took her to the emergency room,

  • and she was, she was in really bad shape.

  • We almost lost her a couple of times,

  • and I was there with my brother every day.

  • It helped me realize something else during this project,

  • is that recording that one second on a really bad day

  • is extremely difficult.

  • It's not -- we tend to take our cameras out when we're doing awesome things.

  • Or we're, "Oh, yeah, this party, let me take a picture."

  • But we rarely do that when we're having a bad day,

  • and something horrible is happening.

  • And I found that it's actually been very, very important

  • to record even just that one second of a really bad moment.

  • It really helps you appreciate the good times.

  • It's not always a good day, so when you have a bad one,

  • I think it's important to remember it,

  • just as much as it is important to remember the [good] days.

  • Now one of the things that I do is I don't use any filters,

  • I don't use anything to -- I try to capture the moment

  • as much as possible as the way that I saw it with my own eyes.

  • I started a rule of first person perspective.

  • Early on, I think I had a couple of videos where

  • you would see me in it, but I realized that wasn't the way to go.

  • The way to really remember what I saw

  • was to record it as I actually saw it.

  • Now a couple of things that I have in my head about this project are,

  • wouldn't it be interesting if thousands of people were doing this?

  • I turned 31 last week, which is there.

  • I think it would be interesting to see

  • what everyone did with a project like this.

  • I think everyone would have a different interpretation of it.

  • I think everyone would benefit from just having that one second to remember every day.

  • Personally, I'm tired of forgetting,

  • and this is a really easy thing to do.

  • I mean, we all have HD-capable cameras in our pockets right now --

  • most people in this room, I bet --

  • and it's something that's --

  • I never want to forget another day that I've ever lived,

  • and this is my way of doing that,

  • and it'd be really interesting also to see,

  • if you could just type in on a website,

  • "June 18, 2018,"

  • and you would just see a stream of people's lives

  • on that particular day from all over the world.

  • And I don't know, I think this project has a lot of possibilities,

  • and I encourage you all to record just a small snippet of your life every day,

  • so you can never forget that that day, you lived.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

So, I'm an artist.

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A2 US TED day project concert record life

【TED】Cesar Kuriyama: One second every day (Cesar Kuriyama: One second every day)

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    VoiceTube posted on 2013/03/05
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