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  • Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on: Easter, and what's it all about?

  • So, if you're in a country where Easter is celebrated, you will already know a lot about

  • it, but maybe if you're not in an English-speaking country, this will be useful for you to know

  • the vocabulary connected with Easter in English-speaking countries. You may be in a country where Easter

  • isn't celebrated, so this is also designed to explain the background, some of the history

  • connected with Easter, and all the sort of traditions and the things that people do to

  • celebrate Easter. And if you're in... For example, if you're in the U.K., you will notice

  • that every spring around March or April there is an Easter holiday where there are two public

  • holidays, the schools have two weeks' holiday, so you'll be aware of this Easter holiday

  • period. So this is designed to explain some of the background to it. Okay.

  • So, it's a bit of a mixture, but going back hundreds of years before Christianity, for

  • example, I think people celebrated the coming of spring after the long, cold winter, so

  • it's a kind of spring celebration when, you know, the flowers start coming out, and blossom

  • on the trees, and so on. Blossom. If you have fruit trees, like an apple tree or a cherry

  • tree, they get flowers appearing on the tree, either white or pink, so that's blossom. And

  • then the flowers that grow. So... and little animals, often animals are born in the spring.

  • They're born all year round, of course, but in particular spring is associated with little

  • animals being born, like little chicks that come out of eggs; little, yellow, fluffy birds;

  • tiny, little chicks. They are associated with Easter, as well as flowers. Rabbits as well

  • are associated with Easter. And eggs, because eggs are about things being born or rebirth,

  • the rebirth of the... of the season, the spring coming back after the winter when nothing

  • seemed to grow. So, people, you know... people generally feel happier and better when spring

  • comes because the weather gets warmer. Of course it depends what part of the planet

  • you're on, because I know March and April in somewhere like Brazil, for example, it's

  • not... it's not your spring period, but I think people still celebrate Easter at that

  • time of year anyway. But in where we are in the U.K. and also North America, it is the spring.

  • So, it falls in March or April, and people send cards sometimes that say: "Happy Easter",

  • and you get pictures of flowers, and little chicks, and rabbits, and eggs. And so the

  • eggs, they can either be real, you know, chicken eggs, hens' eggs from birds, or they can be

  • chocolate eggs. So the shops... of course, shops sell eggs all the year round, real eggs;

  • but also chocolate eggs, a lot of them are sold just before Easter. In fact, usually

  • the shops, being very commercially-minded, as soon as Christmas is over and January comes,

  • you start to see chocolate Easter eggs in the supermarkets, which it's a bit early in

  • January, but that's what the shops are like. So, you get chocolate eggs, and also... In

  • the U.K. anyway, I'm not sure about other countries, you have a sweet... a bun with

  • fruit in it, which is called a hot cross bun. And it's a round... not a cake exactly. It's

  • more like bread, but it's quite sweet, and it has a cross on it in a lighter colour,

  • so it's a dark-brown or medium-brown colour when it's baked in the oven, but it has a

  • whiter-coloured or cream-coloured cross on it, which connects with one of the religious

  • associations that Easter has, which we'll come to a bit later. Okay. So, all of these

  • things are associated with Easter.

  • Also, there's a thing called an Easter bonnet, which is a hat. Usually women, they might

  • have a hat and they will add a lot of flowers to it, and decorate it with ribbons. They

  • might even put little... Not real ones, but they might put little chicks on it; little,

  • yellow birds on it, but not real ones, not live ones, but artificial ones. And there's

  • a song and a film I think connected with this, Easter bonnet. And people might have a parade

  • in the street, they have a competition for who's wearing the best Easter bonnet, and

  • somebody can win the competition. So, that can happen as well. And all the flowers, and

  • chicks, and everything are still associated with the Easter idea.

  • And another nice thing about it is that we get two days' holiday at Easter. So, they're

  • official public holidays in the U.K. and I think in some other countries, too. We have

  • a Friday, and then of course Saturday, Sunday, that's the weekend, and then we have a Monday,

  • so we have a four-day weekend basically. The Friday is called... In the religious terminology,

  • the Friday is called Good Friday and the Monday is called Easter Monday. Okay. So, Friday

  • there's a tradition that people eat fish on Good Friday. Some people eat fish on Fridays

  • generally all through the year as well, but Good Friday particularly people might decide

  • to eat fish rather than meat. Okay. But then Easter Monday or possibly the Sunday, Easter

  • Sunday, people will have a meal which is often a roast, turkey, or chicken, or some sort

  • of meat or lamb with vegetables. It's a bit like the Christmas meal or a Thanksgiving

  • meal in America, so it's a big meal with meat and vegetables because people have more time

  • over that long weekend. So either Easter Monday or Easter Sunday they will have that meal

  • there.

  • Okay, so nowadays Easter, it's still partly religious, it comes from some religious ideas

  • connected with Christianity, but also people just think of it as... If it's not religious,

  • the opposite of religious is secular, meaning just ordinary, everyday life; non-religious.

  • So: "secular" just means not religious. So... okay, no connection with religion is "secular",

  • just ordinary life. So, in Christianity, Jesus was executed, he was killed on the cross,

  • the crucifixion. Okay. So, and that happened, that is connected with this Good Friday. That's

  • supposed to be the date that coincides with that event, the crucifixion, the execution

  • on the cross. Okay. Okay. So, but then in the Bible after the crucifixion on the...

  • If that was a Friday, then Jesus was buried, put in a tomb, but two days later, I suppose

  • on the Sunday... That would be the Sunday, then, Easter Sunday that comes in between

  • here, he mirac-... There was a miracle. Some two women went to the tomb, but they found

  • that the tomb was open and there was no body inside. So, they thought: "Well, somebody's

  • stolen the body", but then somebody came to them and said: "He's not here. He's risen",

  • meaning: "He's gone up to Heaven." Okay. So, there's this idea of the resurrection, which

  • means to rise. So, to sort of still be alive really, but to go up to Heaven. Not dead anymore,

  • but alive, but gone to Heaven. So, that's called the resurrection, coming back to life

  • in a way, but going up to Heaven. So, that was seen to be a miracle. You know, something

  • that can't really happen usually in normal life. So, that's always been celebrated as

  • a very important event in the Christian religion, which is why we have Good Friday connected

  • with the crucifixion, and then Easter Monday... No, sorry. Easter Sunday in here which coincides

  • with the resurrection. So, Easter is a celebration of that.

  • But it's also connected with the Jewish religion, the Passover which was much, much earlier

  • with the... What's called the exodus of the Jewish people from Egypt, who they had been

  • taken to Egypt as slaves and made to work there as slaves, but they wanted to get back

  • to their own land, so this exodus meant... Meaning coming out of Egypt, leaving Egypt,

  • going back to their own country was another kind of miraculous event, really, how it happened.

  • So, that sort of happened around... It sort of connected with the same religious festival

  • at the same time of year, so there is that connection, too, which is much older than

  • the crucifixion and resurrection story. Okay, so that's the religious side. It's all a bit complex.

  • But apart from the religious story, which a lot of people still believe in, there is

  • the secular, non-religious side of Easter where, you know, a lot of working people just

  • think: "Oh, great, we get... We get two extra days off work", which if they're on a salary,

  • you know, they are paid holidays, so to have two extra days at the weekend and have a four-day

  • weekend, it's quite nice if you're a working person and you've been working hard; it gives

  • you a break from your work. And also for children at school, they get two weeks because it's

  • made to coincide with the terms, the three terms of the year, and where the term begins

  • and ends. One term ends before Easter, then there's a two-week break, and then the new...

  • The summer term starts after Easter. So schoolchildren, and colleges and universities as well, have

  • a longer Easter break, but I know sometimes they're having to study for exams and the

  • teachers are having to prepare their lessons for the following term, so they're still probably

  • doing some work during that period. So...

  • And then finally, just to say that there isn't a fixed date for Easter; it's not like with

  • Christmas in the U.K., it's always the 25th of December, but with Easter in any Christian

  • country, whether it's Western Europe or Eastern Europe, or North America, Australia, New Zealand,

  • etc., the Christian church decide when the date is going to be each year. So it could

  • fall in March or April. There's a sort of a whole month, a four-week period where Easter

  • could fall. And it's quite complicated because it's to do with the full moon and the equinox,

  • the spring equinox when the night is the same length as the day, so the length of time that

  • it's dark, the number of hours of darkness equals the number of hours of daylight, so

  • that's the spring equinox, and the moon. So it's different every year, and that's why

  • Easter falls either sometimes in March, sometimes in April. So...

  • So there we are, quite a complicated subject, but one that we experience every year in one

  • way or another. And children love the... Especially the chocolate eggs, adults as well love the

  • chocolate eggs, anything connected with chocolate. And people love mostly the food, having a

  • nice, big meal on Easter Sunday maybe or Easter Monday; meat and vegetables, and so on. And

  • just relaxing, and hopefully enjoying nicer weather by that time of year.

  • So, I hope that's been a useful background and perhaps you've learnt some new vocabulary

  • as well. So, please go to the website: www.engvid.com where there's a quiz to test you on the subject.

  • And thanks for watching, and I hope to see you again soon. Bye for now.

Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on: Easter, and what's it all about?

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A2 UK easter religious friday sunday easter sunday connected

Learn all about EASTER

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    蛇蛇 posted on 2018/04/03
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