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  • - I had to tell the kids.

  • It wasn't like the movie, they took me away.

  • I had reported for jail, alright.

  • And my wife, you know, my ex-wife,

  • we sat down with the kids, it was a Thursday night,

  • and we called the kids into the living room.

  • They're like,

  • "What's up, what's up?"

  • And I started telling my kids, I said,

  • listen, a long time ago, you know when I had

  • that big company and I made some mistakes.

  • And as soon as I started getting even close to it,

  • my daughter starts bursting out, hysterically crying,

  • and my son was very young and he just starts crying

  • because my daughter's crying.

  • And it's just this terrible, gut-wrenching scene where

  • my daughter's yelling no, and my kids are hugging me,

  • and we're just, the worst thing you can imagine.

  • To tell your kids that, Daddy made a mistake

  • and now he's got to go away, you know.

  • And, you know, I was guilty.

  • I couldn't say I was trapped,

  • because I did it, I made the mistake.

  • I took some great skills, and I made the mistakes,

  • and I deserved to be there.

  • So I had no one to blame but myself.

  • I made the mistakes.

  • It's very difficult when you have to

  • come to terms with that, right?

  • And I think when people watch the movie,

  • The Wolf of Wall Street,

  • it's important they look at that movie and say,

  • you know what, I get it, it's glamorous, and it's fun.

  • 'Cause I'm not gonna deny that it was fun.

  • It was glamorous, yeah, but there's something called

  • balance in there that when you are that character

  • that never ends well.

  • It just never ends well.

  • And one question that I get asked all the time,

  • how was I able to stay positive and motivated

  • in what was certainly the worse time of my life.

  • I had lost my money.

  • I had lost my freedom.

  • I had lost my children for a time.

  • My wife, bottomed out, right.

  • And I think about it, and I say,

  • you know, here's the secret,

  • when I was in jail, in those moments,

  • and the worst moments of all were at night time,

  • when you're in your bunk and people are sleeping

  • and you're alone with your thoughts

  • and you could just really get negative.

  • And the answer was that, in bed,

  • when I was alone with my thoughts,

  • I would close my eyes and I would visualize

  • the faces of my two children.

  • And I close my eyes, I see their faces,

  • I knew I had let them down so badly,

  • and caused them so much pain, and I said,

  • there's nothing I won't do, there's no length I won't go to,

  • to prove to these kids that their Dad can do it right.

  • That their Dad's going to come back even better than before.

  • And it was all about proving to my children

  • that you could come back from failure,

  • that you could make the world right.

  • I could be an example and make them proud of me.

  • And that was my why.

  • It was all about my kids.

  • And that's the secret.

  • Your why, it's never about you.

  • People will do crazy things for causes they believe in,

  • but for yourself you'll only go so far.

  • My kid's in trouble, I'll run through a wall of fire,

  • wouldn't think twice about it.

  • And that's step number one, you have to have a vision

  • for your future that inspires you, that makes you,

  • when you think about it, it just makes you jump out of bed

  • in the morning to really have a life that is far better,

  • far greater, than it is today.

  • That's your vision for the future.

  • That's step number one.

  • The second thing is,

  • and this is a big one, and what most people miss.

  • You have to have a strategy, a plan,

  • that allows you to achieve your vision.

  • I was on the beach one day, in the Summer in New York,

  • it's a huge beach, Jones Beach,

  • and it was a hot, Summer, sunny day

  • and everyone's bitching and moaning because

  • they've got to walk about

  • a half mile to the concession stand,

  • and I'm with my friends, I'm like,

  • I wonder what would happen if I went down here

  • with some Italian ices and Chipwichs, and Fudgicles, right,

  • I said well, good idea, I'll sell them for a buck a piece,

  • next morning, I wake up, I look at the yellow pages,

  • this was back with no internet,

  • I find some ice cream distributor,

  • I take my old, beaten up car down there,

  • I go buy a styrofoam cooler, and I load up the cooler

  • with a barrel of Italian ices, Chipwichs, Fudgicles,

  • Milky Way, Snickers, right?

  • Put some dry ice on top.

  • The whole thing, loaded up was $22 including the cooler.

  • The cooler was seven bucks,

  • the ice cream was 15 bucks, right?

  • I get in my car, drive an hour to the beach,

  • it's like 10 o'clock in the morning when I get there.

  • I carry it down there, I walk to the edge of the water,

  • and I start yelling, Italian ices, Chipwichs, Fudgicles.

  • Within one hour, I sell out the entire cooler for $125,

  • and I made 100 bucks in one hour, and the year was 1978.

  • Back then, minimum wage was $1.20 an hour.

  • I made more than my parents that day.

  • I went back with four coolers.

  • Who wouldn't, right?

  • I got four coolers, right.

  • So, I load them up like that.

  • Sold all those out.

  • Made $400-$500 my second day.

  • Changed my life.

  • Here's the interesting thing,

  • I told four or five friends about this,

  • and here's the weird thing,

  • they all went out and did it with me,

  • but only one of them sold more than one cooler a day.

  • There's five people, so four with one cooler of stock,

  • only one of them would go out and he'd hustle

  • all day long and make the 500 bucks versus $100 a day.

  • Why is that?

  • Why would someone do that?

  • We're here, we're young, none of us have money,

  • and you have this opportunity in your sights

  • where you can make big money

  • and that could change your life, yet most of them,

  • 80% stopped with one cooler.

  • They're one cooler people.

  • Only one of them was a four cooler person,

  • just one of my friends.

  • That comes down to that last element,

  • sort of what I call the inner game of success.

  • What happens up here, between your ears,

  • before you ever go out into the world and take action,

  • and that is your standards.

  • Some people, watch how this relates,

  • some people they have a really bright vision,

  • a bold vision, this great grand visions, alright.

  • Amazing, wow, inspiring!

  • But they have low standards.

  • They're not willing to do the work.

  • A champagne vision and beer standards, right.

  • And then you have the other sort of people,

  • those who have really high standards,

  • but they lack a vision for the future.

  • They don't have a vision that inspires them.

  • So these are like the workers that they sort of

  • have this champagne standards and a beer vision.

  • It's about having a match between

  • your standards and your vision.

  • And the question always is,

  • well, what should my standards be?

  • Doesn't matter.

  • They should be congruent with your vision.

  • There's no right or wrong answer.

  • How much money?

  • It doesn't matter.

  • You have to have that vision for the future.

  • Number two, you have to have the strategies

  • to make the vision into reality.

  • But number three, you have to be able

  • to share that vision with other people.

  • To communicate the vision to people in a way

  • that moves them to take action, to come help you achieve it,

  • that gets them going, gets them pumped.