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  • JEFF: What's up, guys?

  • Jeff Cavaliere, ATHLEANX.com.

  • Today I'm standing here, obviously, with Jesse, and what we're doing is, we're talking about

  • his shoulders because I think there's a lot to learn from what Jesse's been able to do

  • here.

  • Now, he's been training all along, and you guys have watched his progress, but notably,

  • we covered this with his arms.

  • Let's see those arms one more time.

  • The arms have definitely gotten bigger, but so have his shoulders and I wanted to dip

  • into his brainas scary as that isto go in there and say "Jesse, what things have

  • you really incorporated from the things we've been working on, that have helped you to get

  • your shoulders bigger?

  • I know the people out there watching are going to be able to benefit them as well.

  • Let's cover the top six things that you feel have helped you the most.

  • Right off the bat, what's the first thing?

  • JESSE: First thing that comes to mind islike you always say "It's hard to get a stretch

  • on your delts when you're working out, when you're working your shoulders".

  • Incorporating different exercises that allow me to get that stretch, I think, have been

  • extremely helpful and very beneficial.

  • JEFF: It is difficult to get a stretch on the delts because when you think about arms

  • lined up in a side lateral raise they usually stop at the side of your body.

  • They don't come across midline.

  • They don't get that extra stretch on the delt, but doing it the way Jesse is doing

  • here allows for that.

  • Likewise, when you do a dumbbell side raise you don't have to use cables, you can use

  • dumbbells, too.

  • Just propping them up on an incline bench in this position allows for that arm to come

  • across the body, and to get that additional stretch, and it doesn't have to just apply

  • to the side delts.

  • It can work on the front delts as well.

  • We do that, again, with cables.

  • You can use bands here.

  • The key is allowing the arm to go back, behind the body to free stretch that front delt,

  • which allows for more powerful contraction.

  • But really, it allows for that eccentric overload on a muscle that doesn't usually get it.

  • So that was right off the bat, but what else did you learn?

  • JESSE: Using light weights.

  • Ever since the first hard gainer video that we did with my shoulders, you told me to-

  • JEFF: Long time ago.

  • JESSE: Yeah, that was a long time ago.

  • You told me to start using lighter weights and as humbling as that was for me, I was

  • down to 5lbs on all my lateral raises, and one and a half rep technique, and also you

  • telling me to slide my arms underneath the fence.

  • JEFF: Right.

  • JESSE: Those two techniques themselves have been extremely helpful, using the light weights.

  • JEFF: So the concept, again, is that it's not necessarily about the weights that you're

  • lifting, it's what the muscles you're trying to train are lifting.

  • In the case of the deltoids I can promise you, they're a hell of a lot weaker than you

  • think they are.

  • So when you drop those weights down, however humbling it may be, the results are better

  • and you can even seeJesse has told me how he feels.

  • Those shoulders have rounded out a lot more, and it's definitely noticeable.

  • Sometimes the light weights are the way to go, especially if you've got to rebuild from

  • the ground, back up.

  • All right, Jesse.

  • We're onto number three to digging into that brain of yours.

  • What have we got?

  • JESSE: You actually just covered it in a video the other day.

  • JEFF: Right?

  • JESSE: The unconventional dumbbell stuff.

  • JEFF: The different exercises for your delts.

  • JESSE: Yeah, exactly.

  • JEFF: Because it's not just about presses and raises.

  • JESSE: It's – yeah.

  • No, I always thought it was.

  • JEFF: Right.

  • JESSE: But when you come up with some really weird shit it always seems to work.

  • Specifically the hip huggers.

  • JEFF: Right.

  • JESSE: And the crush grip press outs.

  • Those, to me, have been game changers.

  • JEFF: So both the hip huggers, guys, if you haven't seen the video make sure you watch

  • it.

  • There really arethey're not just unconventional exercises.

  • They have a purpose and when you put the science back in what we doas we always try to

  • hereyou see the reasoning of why I chose those as exercises.

  • But when it comes to the hip huggers especially, it's basically going to give you an opportunity

  • to train a little heavier, to still train the side delt, in a different way, and get

  • a great contraction, and also tie it in with the rear delt.

  • But beyond that as well, when we look at the crush grip press out this, again, allows us

  • to attack the front delt, preferentially turn the chest, and take the chest out of it a

  • little bitas you can see here with Jesse.

  • We're really getting these front delts to be overloaded and it's not just to be different.

  • It's to mix it up, and get away from that mentality of thinking that you only have the

  • presses and raises for options, when you open up the options more, and you start to do more

  • things.

  • As crazy as they may be, it actually starts to work, and work well.

  • All right, moving on.

  • Number four.

  • JESSE: As boring as it is, all the extra rotator cuff work I've been doing.

  • In other programs I've done, and other trainers I've talked to no one's ever had me doing

  • a lot of rotator cuff stuff.

  • Maybe once a week, or once a month.

  • JEFF: We talk about that a lot, guys.

  • There's not enough being done.

  • It is boring, by the way.

  • JESSE: Yeah.

  • JEFF: But it's necessary.

  • JESSE: It's been extremely helpful because not only do I feel like my posture has improved

  • a ton, but I feel like I'm getting stronger when I go back to my other lifts.

  • JEFF: So what happens, guys, when you actually do start to pay attention to your rotator

  • cuff you start to reestablish the balance that's missing in a lot of our physiques from

  • having too much of a dominant, flexion dominant, side dominant training program.

  • With Jesse just doing even a couple of the exercises here, this is pretty standard external

  • rotation.

  • This is banded external rotation, whether he's doing it here in a dynamic way, or whether

  • he's doing it in more of an isometric way, where he does this step out variation and

  • he has to hold out his elbow in that position, tight up against his side.

  • You can even see the shoulders working here to maintain this proper posture.

  • As a matter of fact, when you go down to the anatomy of it the deltoids have a heavy, upward

  • pull on the humerus trying to pull it up, and it sometimes creates, over time, an impingement.

  • The rotator cuff can act to pull down and keep it in a better position to add more space

  • in there, to avoid impingement, allow you to press better, allow you press heavier,

  • and over time, build bigger shoulders because you're not having the issues that a lot of

  • us wind up having in our shoulders.

  • So for all those reasons, however boring it may be, it's a critical component to a complete

  • training program.

  • All right, Jesse.

  • Number five.

  • JESSE: Number five?

  • Ever since the minute you did it on Instagram for your chestyou know what I'm talking

  • about?

  • JEFF: Uh

  • JESSE: Overcoming isometric on the cable machine?

  • JEFF: Right.

  • Yeah, I got you.

  • JESSE: That's been awesome.

  • JEFF: Yep.

  • JESSE: Honestly, I love that feeling of trying as hard as I can to move an immoveable object.

  • I don't care if I'm not moving.

  • It feels unbelievable.

  • JEFF: Right.

  • Well, there's a purpose beyond that.

  • Instead of just pretending what you're trying to do.

  • The overcoming isometric that we've talked about here, on this channel doesn't just apply

  • to the chest, as I've demonstrated in that video that Jesse's referring to.

  • You could do it for pretty much any muscle group, but the concept is, you can build up

  • more motor unit recruitment.

  • Meaning, you can work against this immovable load here, as he's doing in this side lateral

  • raise version.

  • He's not moving these cables up, but he's trying to move them up, and out to the sides.

  • As he's trying, and trying, and trying he's getting a better, and better recruitment.

  • More and more units are being recruited to try to help him, ultimately failing, but it

  • allows him to then apply that at lighter loads, for greater strength output.

  • It doesn't just have to happen here with the side lateral raise.

  • We can pull the cables out to the front as well and do the same thing.

  • Again, it may not look like much, but he's trying as hard as he can to move the stack,

  • to get his arms raised up to parallel to the ground.

  • But of course, they're not going anywhere.

  • The one thing about overcoming isometrics is that it applies in the angle, or close

  • to the angle which you're training them in.

  • So if you wanted to try to work on your strength and your recruitment ability outside of that

  • position down low, then you try to raise them up a little higher, and you try to raise them

  • up a little bit higher from there.

  • Probably the only drawback to them, but as far as their ability to increase muscularity,

  • it's obvious to what it's done for you, and obviously what it's going to do for you, if

  • you give it a try.

  • Last, but not least.

  • Make it a good one.

  • Let's go.

  • Number six.

  • JESSE: Last but not least is – I've found that training with you has been awesome, in

  • that you don't let me fail.

  • You make sure there's always a way.

  • JEFF: Mm-hmm.

  • JESSE: Especially when it comes to heavy weight training.

  • For me, with my collarbone issue, after breaking that, and destroying everything up in here,