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  • Translator: Jenny Zurawell

  • It's a great honor to be here.

  • It's a great honor to be here talking about cities,

  • talking about the future of cities.

  • It's great to be here as a mayor.

  • I really do believe that mayors have the political position

  • to really change people's lives.

  • That's the place to be.

  • And it's great to be here as the mayor of Rio.

  • Rio's a beautiful city,

  • a vibrant place, special place.

  • Actually, you're looking at a guy

  • who has the best job in the world.

  • And I really wanted to share with you

  • a very special moment of my life

  • and the history of the city of Rio.

  • (Video) Announcer: And now, ladies and gentlemen,

  • the envelope containing the result.

  • Jacques Rogge: I have the honor to announce

  • that the games of the 31st Olympiad

  • are awarded to the city of Rio de Janeiro.

  • (Cheering)

  • EP: Okay, that's very touching, very emotional,

  • but it was not easy to get there.

  • Actually it was a very hard challenge.

  • We had to beat the European monarchy.

  • This is Juan Carlos, king of Spain.

  • We had to beat the powerful Japanese with all of their technology.

  • We had to beat the most powerful man in the world

  • defending his own city.

  • So it was not easy at all.

  • And actually this last guy here said a phrase a few years ago

  • that I think fits perfectly to the situation

  • of Rio winning the Olympic bid.

  • We really showed that, yes, we can.

  • And really, this is the reason I came here tonight.

  • I came here tonight to tell you

  • that things can be done,

  • that you don't have always to be rich or powerful

  • to get things on the way,

  • that cities are a great challenge.

  • It's a difficult task to deal with cities.

  • But with some original ways

  • of getting things done,

  • with some basic commandments,

  • you can really get cities

  • to be a great, great place to live.

  • I want you all to imagine Rio.

  • You probably think about a city full of energy,

  • a vibrant city full of green.

  • And nobody showed that better

  • than Carlos Saldanha in last year's "Rio."

  • (Music)

  • (Video) Bird: This is incredible.

  • (Music)

  • EP: Okay, some parts of Rio are pretty much like that,

  • but it's not like that everywhere.

  • We're like every big city in the world.

  • We've got lots of people,

  • pollution, cars, concrete, lots of concrete.

  • These pictures I'm showing here,

  • they are some pictures from Madureira.

  • It's like the heart of the suburb in Rio.

  • And I want to use an example of Rio

  • that we're doing in Madureira, in this region,

  • to see what we should think as our first commandment.

  • So every time you see a concrete jungle like that,

  • what you've got to do is find open spaces.

  • If you don't have open spaces,

  • you've got to go there and open spaces.

  • So go inside these open spaces

  • and make it that people can get inside

  • and use those spaces.

  • This is going to be the third largest park in Rio

  • by June this year.

  • It's going to be a place where people can meet,

  • where you can put nature.

  • The temperature's going to drop two, three degrees centigrade.

  • So the first commandment

  • I want to leave you tonight

  • is, a city of the future

  • has to be environmentally friendly.

  • Every time you think of a city,

  • you've got to think green.

  • You've got to think green and green.

  • So moving to our second commandment that I wanted to show you.

  • Let's think that cities are made of people,

  • lots of people together.

  • cities are packed with people.

  • So how do you move these people around?

  • When you have 3.5 billion people living in cities --

  • by 2050, it's going to be 6 billion people.

  • So every time you think about moving these people around,

  • you think about high-capacity transportation.

  • But there is a problem.

  • High-capacity transportation means

  • spending lots and lots of money.

  • So what I'm going to show here

  • is something that was already presented in TED

  • by the former mayor of Curitiba

  • who created that, a city in Brazil, Jaime Lerner.

  • And it's something that we're doing, again, lots in Rio.

  • It's the BRT, the Bus Rapid Transit.

  • So you get a bus. It's a simple bus that everybody knows.

  • You transform it inside as a train car.

  • You use separate lanes, dedicated lanes.

  • The contractors, they don't like that.

  • You don't have to dig deep down underground.

  • You can build nice stations.

  • This is actually a station that we're doing in Rio.

  • Again, you don't have to dig deep down underground

  • to make a station like that.

  • This station has the same comfort, the same features

  • as a subway station.

  • A kilometer of this costs a tenth of a subway.

  • So spending much less money and doing it much faster,

  • you can really change the way people move.

  • This is a map of Rio.

  • All the lines, the colored lines you see there,

  • it's our high-capacity transportation network.

  • In this present time today,

  • we only carry 18 percent of our population

  • in high-capacity transportation.

  • With the BRTs we're doing,

  • again, the cheapest and fastest way,

  • we're going to move to 63 percent of the population

  • being carried by high-capacity transportation.

  • So remember what I said:

  • You don't always have to be rich or powerful

  • to get things done.

  • You can find original ways to get things done.

  • So the second commandment I want to leave you tonight

  • is, a city of the future

  • has to deal with mobility and integration

  • of its people.

  • Moving to the third commandment.

  • And this is the most controversial one.

  • It has to do with the favelas, the slums --

  • whatever you call it, there are different names all over the world.

  • But the point we want to make here tonight

  • is, favelas are not always a problem.

  • I mean, favelas can sometimes

  • really be a solution,

  • if you deal with them,

  • if you put public policy inside the favelas.

  • Let me just show a map of Rio again.

  • Rio has 6.3 million inhabitants --

  • More than 20 percent, 1.4 million, live in the favelas.

  • All these red parts are favelas.

  • So you see, they are spread all over the city.

  • This is a typical view of a favela in Rio.

  • You see the contrast between the rich and poor.

  • So I want to make two points here tonight about favelas.

  • The first one is,

  • you can change from what I call a [vicious] circle

  • to a virtual circle.

  • But what you've got to do to get that

  • is you've got to go inside the favelas,

  • bring in the basic services --

  • mainly education and health -- with high quality.

  • I'm going to give a fast example here.

  • This was an old building in a favela in Rio --

  • [unclear favela name] --

  • that we just transformed into a primary school,

  • with high quality.

  • This is primary assistance in health

  • that we built inside a favela,

  • again, with high quality.

  • We call it a family clinic.

  • So the first point is bring basic services

  • inside the favelas

  • with high quality.

  • The second point I want to make about the favelas

  • is, you've got to open spaces in the favela.

  • Bring infrastructure

  • to the favelas, to the slums, wherever you are.

  • Rio has the aim, by 2020,

  • to have all its favelas completely urbanized.

  • Another example, this was completely packed with houses,

  • and then we built this, what we call, a knowledge square.

  • This is a place with high technology

  • where the kids that live in a poor house next to this place

  • can go inside and have access to all technology.

  • We even built a theater there -- 3D movie.

  • And this is the kind of change you can get for that.

  • And by the end of the day you get something better than a TED Prize,

  • which is this great laugh

  • from a kid that lives in the favela.

  • So the third commandment I want to leave here tonight

  • is, a city of the future

  • has to be socially integrated.

  • You cannot deal with a city

  • if it's not socially integrated.

  • But moving to our fourth commandment,

  • I really wouldn't be here tonight.

  • Between November and May, Rio's completely packed.

  • We just had last week Carnivale.

  • It was great. It was lots of fun.

  • We have New Year's Eve.

  • There's like two million people on Copacabana Beach.

  • We have problems.

  • We fight floods, tropical rains at this time of the year.

  • You can imagine how people get happy with me

  • watching these kinds of scenes.

  • We have problems with the tropical rains.

  • Almost every year

  • we have these landslides, which are terrible.

  • But the reason I could come here

  • is because of that.

  • This was something we did with IBM

  • that's a little bit more than a year old.

  • It's what we call the Operations Center of Rio.

  • And I wanted to show that I can govern my city, using technology,

  • from here, from Long Beach,

  • so I got here last night and I know everything.

  • We're going to speak now to the Operations Center.

  • This is Osorio,

  • he's our secretary of urban affairs.

  • So Osorio, good to be there with you.

  • I've already told the people

  • that we have tropical rain this time of year.

  • So how's the weather in Rio now?

  • Osorio: The weather is fine. We have fair weather today.

  • Let me get you our weather satellite radar.

  • You see just a little bit of moisture around the city.

  • Absolutely no problem in the city in terms of weather,

  • today and in the next few days.

  • EP: Okay, how's the traffic?

  • We, at this time of year, get lots of traffic jams.

  • People get mad at the mayor. So how's the traffic tonight?

  • Osario: Well traffic tonight is fine.

  • Let me get you one of our 8,000 buses.

  • A live transmission in downtown Rio for you, Mr. Mayor.

  • You see, the streets are clear.

  • Now it's 11:00 pm in Rio.

  • Nothing of concern in terms of traffic.

  • I'll get to you now the incidents of the day.

  • We had heavy traffic early in the morning

  • and in the rush hour in the afternoon,

  • but nothing of big concern.

  • We are below average

  • in terms of traffic incidents in the city.

  • EP: Okay, so you're showing now some public services.

  • These are the cars.

  • Osorio: Absolutely, Mr. Mayor.

  • Let me get you the fleet of our waste collection trucks.

  • This is live transmission.

  • We have GPS's in all of our trucks.

  • And you can see them working

  • in all parts of the city.

  • Waste collection on time.

  • Public services working well.

  • EP: Okay, Osorio, thank you very much.

  • It was great to have you here.

  • We're going to move so that I can make a conclusion.

  • (Applause)

  • Okay, so no files, this place, no paperwork,

  • no distance, 24/7 working.