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  • Hello, everyone. I'm George. Today, let's talk about phrases with unexpected meanings.

  • Okay. In English, there are certain phrases, when you see them, you

  • don't get the meaning right away. And today, we're going to cover six of those

  • phrases, that you might not know the meaning of when you just look at the

  • words. Here we go. Number One. Big Break. Big Break. In English, when you say big

  • break, it does not have anything to do with breaking your legs or your arms.

  • In English, we do use the word "break" a lot. For example, if you want to wish somebody

  • good luck, you would say "Break a leg!" It means I wish you good luck. Here, "Big

  • Break" means your big chance. The chance for you to become more famous or more

  • successful. Then we would say, "It's your big break!" Let's take a look at this

  • sentence. This is your big break. Hold on to it. This is your big break.

  • hold on to it. And Number Two. Walk on thin ice. Walk on thin ice. In Chinese, we

  • have very similar saying, but when you say this in Chinese, it means you are a

  • careful person. You are doing something cautiously. However, in English, when I say

  • "You are walking on thin ice," that is a warning. It is to warn you that you're

  • doing something dangerous. You are going to get yourself into trouble. Let's take

  • a look at the example sentence. You're walking on thin ice. Don't make another

  • mistake. You're walking on thin ice. Don't make

  • another mistake. And Number Three. Luck out. Luck out. If you interpret this phrase

  • literally, you might think it means you are out of luck. You are not very lucky.

  • However, it is totally different. When you say somebody "lucked out," it means that

  • person has very good luck. The word "luck" here is used as a verb.

  • Let's take a look at the sentence here. Our team just lucked out in last night's

  • game. Our team just lucked out in last night's game. And let's move on.

  • Number Four. Hold a candle to. Hold a candle to.

  • Literally, when you hold a candle to someone.

  • In English when you say to "hold a candle to" it means to be as good as.

  • to be performing very well. Usually, this

  • phrase is used with a "not" in the front, so you would say "can't hold a candle to"

  • Let's take a look at the sentence here. Don't worry. He can't even hold a candle

  • to you. You are still going to win. Don't worry. He can't even hold a candle to

  • you. You are still going to win. And Number Five.

  • Catch wind of. Catch wind of. To catch wind of something means something is

  • spreading over the wind. Not something smelly. In Chinese, there is actually a

  • very similar phrase to "catch wind of." It means to hear of something, to hear

  • about something that happened to someone else. This phrase is most of the time

  • used on something you're not supposed to know.

  • So when you say "catch wind of something" it means you learn something you're not

  • supposed to know. It's a secret. Let's take a look at the example

  • sentence. They tried very hard to cover the secret, but their parents still

  • caught wind of it. They tried very hard to cover the secret, but their parents

  • still caught wind of it. And Number Six. Get a kick out of. Get a kick out of. To get a

  • kick out of something does not really mean that you're supposed to kick

  • someone. It means something that is totally different. To get a kick out of

  • something means you had a lot of fun in it, for example, your reading, your

  • studying, your learning English. Let's take a look at example sentence. I get a

  • kick out of learning English. I get a kick out of learning English. These are

  • the six phrases that I teach today that do not show their meanings right away. Do

  • you have any phrases that you see and you don't get right away? Share them down

  • below at the comment area, Tell us, and if you like this video, make sure you click

  • the like button down below, or you can subscribe to this channel. I'll see you

  • next time. Bye.

Hello, everyone. I'm George. Today, let's talk about phrases with unexpected meanings.

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Phrases with Unexpected Meanings

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    林世音 posted on 2018/03/04
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