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  • Hello.

  • My name is Emma and in today's video we are talking about love and dating.

  • I'm going to teach you some very good vocabulary you can use when you're talking

  • about boyfriends, girlfriends, people you like.

  • You will see these words maybe on TV, in movies, especially if you like romantic comedies,

  • these words come out...

  • Up a lot.

  • So, specifically, what I am going to teach you is phrasal verbs that have to do with

  • love, as well as dating.

  • Okay?

  • So you might be wondering: "What is a phrasal verb?"

  • Good question.

  • So, if you know what a verb is, a verb is an action.

  • Okay?

  • So some examples of verbs are: "play", "listen", "look", "eat".

  • These are all different verbs.

  • A phrasal verb is a little bit different.

  • The reason a phrasal verb is different is because you have the verb and a preposition.

  • Okay?

  • So what's a preposition?

  • A preposition is a word like: "on", "off", "over", "under", "above", "below", "at", "in".

  • These are all prepositions.

  • Okay?

  • So, the thing about a phrasal verb is when you have a verb...

  • Imagine the verb "get", if we add a preposition to it, it changes the meaning of the verb.

  • So, for example, we have: "get on", "get off", "get over", "get under".

  • Okay?

  • "Get above".

  • We have all these different phrasal verbs with "get" and each one has different meanings,

  • and the meaning is really in the preposition.

  • Okay?

  • So, we have tons of these in English and we use them a lot in conversation.

  • So today we're going to look at some ones that have to do with dating.

  • So, let's give some examples.

  • Okay?

  • I have here: "hit on".

  • "Hit on" is a phrasal verb.

  • We have "hit", which is the verb, and "on" which is the proposition.

  • Okay?

  • So before we continue I just wanted to point out one thing.

  • There are different types of phrasal verbs.

  • So we have phrasal verbs where the verb and the preposition are together, there's nothing

  • in between them.

  • So: "hit on" is an example of this.

  • You see "hit" and "on", they're together.

  • There's nothing in here.

  • There's no person, there's no object.

  • "Hit" and "on", the preposition and the verb are together.

  • Now, there is also a different type of phrasal verb where you have the verb, and then there's

  • something in between the verb, and then there's the preposition.

  • So, for example, another phrasal verb we will look at today: "check out".

  • You have: "Check her out."

  • So you actually have the verb, the preposition, but there is something in between the verb

  • and the preposition.

  • In this case we have a person.

  • In other cases it might be an object.

  • Okay?

  • There's also a third type of phrasal verb where pretty much with the third type you

  • have a choice.

  • You can either put the phrasal verb together or it can be separate.

  • Today, we're mainly, though, looking at either ones that are together like "hit on", or ones

  • that are separated by a person or a thing, such as: "Check her out."

  • If you're a little bit confused, don't worry because we will be looking at so many examples

  • of what I'm talking about today so you will really understand this concept.

  • Okay, so let's look at "hit on" and the meaning of "hit on".

  • So I have here the sentence: "Dave hit on me."

  • Okay?

  • So we have "hit", which is the verb, "on", which is the preposition.

  • They're always together.

  • And what this means is it means Dave said something to me, he told me that I was maybe

  • beautiful or pretty, and maybe he asked me for my phone number.

  • When you hit on somebody, it means that you're showing somebody that you're interested in them.

  • Okay?

  • So if you ever have seen any movies where you have people in bars or at clubs, you...

  • And this can also be for real life, too, you might have a man go up to a woman and hit

  • on her, meaning he says to the woman: "Can I buy you a drink?"

  • Or, you know: "Can I talk to you? I think you're very beautiful."

  • So this is "hit on".

  • It means you're telling somebody or you're showing somebody that you are interested in them.

  • Okay?

  • Okay, the next one I wanted to look at, the next phrasal verb is: "check out".

  • So: "The man checked her out."

  • What does this mean?

  • When somebody checks you out, it means they're looking at you in a certain way.

  • "Check out", when we're talking about dating, really has to do with the eyes.

  • Okay?

  • So when you check someone out it means you use your eyes to look at them up and down.

  • And while you're looking at them, you're thinking: "Wow, this person's very handsome."

  • Or: "Wow, this person's very beautiful. This girl is so sexy."

  • Okay?

  • So you're really, really thinking about how attractive they are.

  • So you're not talking, you're just looking at somebody and thinking about how attractive

  • they are.

  • So, when someone looks at a person showing interest.

  • So I have here a picture of this.

  • I have a woman here and a man here.

  • And this woman with her eyes, she's looking at the guy and she's thinking:

  • "Wow, he's cute."

  • So she's checking him out.

  • Sometimes you have friends, maybe there's a group of women who are looking at a guy,

  • and they're looking him up and down, and they're thinking: "Wow, what a handsome guy."

  • They're checking that man out.

  • Or the same can be the opposite.

  • Maybe there's a bunch of guys.

  • Maybe construction workers, that's a common stereotype, and a girl's walking by in a nice,

  • pretty dress.

  • And all the guys are looking at her.

  • Those guys are checking her out.

  • Okay?

  • So these are two common phrasal verbs we use with dating.

  • Now let's look at some more.

  • Okay, so the next phrasal verb we're going to look at is probably the most important

  • on this list, and the reason it's so important is because we use it all the time.

  • Okay? So this is...

  • You will definitely hear this one a lot.

  • So let's look at it.

  • This is: "go out with somebody".

  • Okay? So, for example: "Calvin goes out with Amy."

  • Or: "They are going out."

  • So what does "go out" mean?

  • Well, it's another way to say to date or to be a couple.

  • Okay? So, for example, we have here Calvin and we have here Amy.

  • And every Friday night maybe they like to go to the movies together, and they go to

  • a restaurant together, and they really like each other, that's why I drew the hearts.

  • So they are going out.

  • It means they are going on a date, maybe they're boyfriend and girlfriend, maybe not.

  • Maybe Calvin has five girlfriends, and he's going out with five women at the same time.

  • You know, it's...

  • In different cultures you get different things happening with dating, but going out means

  • you're pretty much with somebody and you really like them.

  • Okay?

  • So Calvin is going out with Amy.

  • They're a couple.

  • They're together.

  • Okay?

  • So, I want you to pay attention to this: "go out" is also together.

  • They're one of those phrasal verbs where "go" and "out" are together, there's nothing between them.

  • We don't need the "with".

  • We can actually end just with: "They're going out."

  • So if you're talking about two names: "Kim goes out with Kanye", for example, in that

  • case you'd use the "with", but if you're just talking about two people and, you know, like

  • they're at the beginning of the sentence, you can also say: "Kim and Kanye are going out."

  • Okay?

  • So very, very important.

  • It comes up a lot in English culture.

  • If you're ever interested, maybe you meet two people and you want to know if they're

  • boyfriend and girlfriend, you can say:

  • "Hey. Are those two people going out?"

  • Okay?

  • So that's how we can use it.

  • Let's look at another example.

  • "Stand" or "stood me up".

  • So, "stand" is the present tense of "stood"; "stood" is the past tense.

  • They have the same meaning.

  • In this example I'm using the past tense.

  • So my example is: "My date", so the person I'm going out with, "My date stood me up."

  • What does this mean?

  • Well, it means when you have plans to meet somebody, imagine I'm supposed to go to the

  • movies and I'm supposed to go with my boyfriend.

  • And imagine if at the very last minute he doesn't come.

  • So I'm waiting there, I'm looking at my watch:

  • "Hmm, where's my boyfriend? Why hasn't he come yet?"

  • And he doesn't call, he doesn't tell me where he is so I wait, and wait, and wait, and he

  • never comes.

  • That's a very sad story.

  • Luckily that's never happened, but it means to stand someone up.

  • Okay?

  • So, any time you see somebody waiting and waiting, and their date doesn't come

  • - they were stood up.

  • Okay, so one thing to notice with the grammar of this: "stood" and "up", is there something

  • between "stood" and "up"?

  • You'll notice in this case the word "me", but it's a person.

  • So you can stand a person up.

  • So, Cindy stood John up.

  • Okay?

  • So a lot of the times we have a person here.

  • Could we do it without?

  • "My date stood up"?

  • No, this has a different meaning.

  • In this case, without a person here it means you stand up.

  • So, that's why the placement of these things are so important.

  • All right, let's look at two more examples.

  • We have: "turn on" and "turn off".

  • Two more very good examples of dating vocabulary.

  • So, what are these examples?

  • "Tattoos turn me on."

  • This means tattoos, in my opinion, are attractive.

  • I like tattoos on a man.

  • When I see tattoos...

  • No, no. Can you see?

  • Okay?

  • I feel my heart flutter.

  • I like tattoos.

  • Okay? Now, what's the opposite?

  • Big muscles, so big muscles turn me off.

  • This means in my opinion I don't think they're attractive.

  • It means I don't like big muscles.

  • Okay?

  • For some people you could say intelligence, people who are smart turn me on.

  • People who like to read turn me on.

  • People with mustaches turn me on.

  • This means I find them attractive.

  • And then the opposite maybe you could say somebody who smells turns me off.

  • Maybe somebody who is rude, somebody who is not polite

  • - that's a turn off, that turns me off.

  • So, it means I don't like that in a person I'm dating.

  • So, "turn on" is attractive, "turn off" means it's something unattractive.

  • Now, notice the placement for these phrasal verbs.

  • Okay?

  • "Tattoos turn me on."

  • Is there something...?

  • Is something in between "turn" and "on"?

  • Yeah, we have the person here.

  • You know, Hollywood actors turn me on.

  • Okay? It means I find them attractive.

  • You could also put somebody else's name here, for example.

  • I know with my sister, British guys, she loves British accents

  • - British accents turn my sister on.

  • Okay?

  • Maybe beards, long beards turn my sister off.

  • So you can put a person between "turn" and "on" or "turn" and "off".

  • We also have the noun form of this.

  • We can say: "Wow. Beards are a turn on."

  • In this case it's a noun.

  • Or we can say: "Long hair on a man is a turn on."

  • We can say: "Smelly..."

  • You know: "People who smell are a turn off."

  • Okay?

  • So we have it in the noun form.

  • Okay, and this is actually quite common, too.

  • So now let's look at some other phrasal verbs we can use.

  • Okay, so our next phrasal verb is also very common, and that is "to make out with somebody".

  • In this case I have it in the past tense, but we can also say:

  • "They make out" or "They will make out".

  • In this case I wrote: "They made out."

  • So "made" is the verb and "out" is the preposition.

  • So, what does this mean?

  • It means to kiss very passionately.

  • So, you know, sometimes you might see people...

  • Usually not in public, but every once in a while you might see somebody making out with

  • somebody else on a park bench, for example.

  • So this is making out.

  • It means to kiss very passionately.

  • Our next sentence is: "hook up".

  • Okay?

  • "Hook up"...

  • "Hook" in this case is the verb and "up" is the preposition.

  • When you say "hook up" it usually means sex, they had sex.

  • They hooked up.