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  • Hello! I'm Emma from mmmEnglish and in this

  • lesson, I'm going to share with you 10

  • English words that you're probably

  • mispronouncing! If you are learning to

  • speak English, then pronunciation is

  • probably one of the biggest frustrations

  • that you have right now and these words

  • that I've chosen are difficult because

  • of the combination of letters or sounds

  • in English. Together they can be quite

  • difficult or your eyes can, in fact, play

  • tricks on you because the letters that

  • you see, they don't sound like you think

  • they should and some of these words are

  • even difficult for native English

  • speakers to pronounce! But don't worry

  • about it, don't sweat, we are going to fix

  • these pronunciation problems right here,

  • right now in this lesson! Let's get

  • started! OK the first word is 'vegetable'

  • 'vegetable'. Now this word is a challenge

  • because it looks like there should be

  • four syllables in this word. 'Vegetable'.

  • But there's not, there are three

  • syllables, 'vegetable'. Can you see the

  • syllable - that we completely forget the 'e'?

  • 'Vegetable'. We don't pronounce that second

  • syllable. 'Vegetable', 'vegetable'.

  • Fantastic!

  • I'm going to the market to get some

  • vegetables for dinner.

  • 'Comfortable'. Now

  • this word, just like 'vegetable', has an

  • extra vowel in there that we don't need

  • to pronounce. 'Comfortable', not 'comfortable'

  • or 'comfortable' but

  • 'comfort-

  • -able'. 'Comfortable'. You skip that vowel

  • sound. 'Comfortable'. You look very

  • comfortable this afternoon.

  • 'Almond'. Now in this word the 'L' is silent.

  • It's not 'almond' or 'almond' it's 'al-

  • -mond', 'almond', 'almond', 'almond'.

  • I'm going to make an

  • almond cake for dessert.

  • Now there are lots of other English words that have a

  • silent letter 'L' in them - words like

  • 'salmon', not 'salmon', 'half', not 'half', 'would',

  • 'talk', 'walk'. All of these words have a

  • silent 'L' in them, which makes them a

  • little bit tricky to pronounce correctly.

  • I've got a separate video that is all

  • about silent letters in English words

  • and I talk about the letter 'L' and lots

  • of other silent letters in that video.

  • You can check it out up here at the end

  • of this video!

  • OK, what about this one?

  • How many times

  • have you been asked to read a paragraph

  • out aloud in front of the class and

  • you've been reading and then you come

  • across this and you think, 'How on earth

  • am I going to say that?!' Lots of native

  • English speakers actually mess this up

  • as well and they'll pronounce X-cetera

  • or X-cetera and it should be pronounced

  • 'et cetera', 'et cetera', 'et cetera'.

  • or 'et cetera', if you're like me. OK this one

  • is especially difficult! 'Clothes', 'clothes',

  • 'clothes'. Now the reason why it's

  • especially difficult is because of the

  • two final consonant sounds, the '-th' and

  • the plural sound. Now this noun is of

  • course, always plural. Clothes refers to

  • shirts, shorts, trousers, jumpers, jackets

  • - anything that you wear is your clothes,

  • are your clothes! But 'clothes', 'clothes'

  • not 'cloths', not 'close' and not 'clothes' either!

  • The difficult thing about the

  • pronunciation of this word is the two

  • consonant sounds.

  • together. Both of

  • those sounds are voiced consonant sounds

  • so the sound is made here in your vocal

  • cords.

  • Now the thing to remember

  • that's really important is with that '-th' sound

  • you need to bring your teeth through

  • - your tongue through your teeth! Now the

  • '-th' sound is very, very soft. It is

  • definitely still there, it needs to sound

  • different from the verb 'close'. OK, which

  • doesn't have the '-th' sound. This word has

  • the '-th' sound, 'clothes', 'clothes'. It's very

  • short but it's definitely there! I need

  • to pack my clothes tonight because we

  • leave early in the morning. I need to

  • pack my clothes tonight.

  • 'Jewellery', 'jewellery', 'jewellery'.

  • Again, we've got an extra vowel here that we don't need

  • to pronounce. We don't say 'jewellery',

  • 'jewellery'. It's just 'jewellery' and actually

  • in American English the spelling is

  • slightly different to the British and

  • the Australian version. And the American

  • version should help you to pronounce

  • this word more correctly. 'Jewelry', 'jewelry',

  • so that's gold, silver, pearls, diamonds,

  • earrings, rings, necklaces - all of these

  • things that we wear to make ourselves

  • look more beautiful! I don't wear a lot

  • of jewellery myself. The only jewellery I

  • wear is this ring and sometimes some earrings.

  • 'Architecture', 'architecture'.

  • This one is so often mispronounced! I hear

  • 'architecture', 'architecture',

  • - which is incorrect! The '-ch' sound in this word is a

  • sound like in 'cat'.

  • 'Architecture', 'architect'.

  • 'Architect'.

  • It's not the same '-ch' sound

  • that you hear in words like 'chocolate'

  • and 'cheese', it's a sound and there are

  • quite a few English words that actually

  • have this same pronunciation of the '-ch'

  • combination - words like 'stomach' and 'ache'.

  • The '-ch' in all of these words is

  • pronounced like a sound.

  • My brother is an architect.

  • He went home early because he had a stomach ache.

  • 'Enthusiastic', not

  • 'enthusiastic' or 'enthusiastic', but

  • 'enthusiastic'. You have to work harder to

  • get this one correct! So many of my

  • students say "This one is too hard! I'm

  • just not going to use this word!" and I

  • say "NO, we are going to get it right,

  • right now, together here in this lesson!"

  • 'Enthusiastic'. So what you need to do

  • is break down this word. Start with the

  • first syllable,

  • Where is your

  • tongue? What's it doing on that final

  • consonant sound?

  • It's at the top of

  • your mouth and the 'n' sound is made back

  • in the soft palate - it's a nasal sound

  • and to move to the '-th' sound, you need to

  • of course, bring your tongue down and out

  • through your teeth.

  • The tongue must come out through the middle of your

  • teeth! If you don't, you will mispronounce

  • this word and you'll say 'enthusiastic'

  • or 'enthusiastic' instead. You need

  • to say

  • See how I'm breaking that down for you?

  • 'Enthusiastic', 'enthusiastic'.

  • Now you're going to be enthusiastic

  • about using that word!

  • 'Word', 'world'.

  • and 'work'.

  • Now you're probably mispronouncing

  • these words because you are looking at

  • the '-or' and you're trying to pronounce

  • the vowel sound 'or', like in 'door'.

  • But this is incorrect, the vowel sound is actually

  • as in 'her'. 'Work', 'world', 'word'.

  • This is your eyes playing tricks on you! Your eyes are

  • seeing these words, seeing the letters O

  • and R and they're telling you to

  • pronounce 'or' but, in fact, you should be

  • pronouncing

  • for all of these words!

  • 'Word'. 'World. 'Work'.

  • If you pronounce 'or', especially for this last one, 'work', it

  • actually sounds a lot like the English