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  • My name is Erin and this is food for thought.

  • So here's an interesting story that's in the news today.

  • In north Portland Oregon,

  • a chicken has caused a traffic jam because it was trying to cross the road.

  • And not only where cars stopped for the sake of the chicken

  • but local authorities were called.

  • And there's actually phone clip let's hear it

  • Dispatcher: Non-emergency.

  • Caller: Hi, um,

  • this is actually not a prank.

  • There is a chicken trying to cross the road

  • off of highway 30 across from the lighthouse.

  • Dispatcher: (laughing)

  • Cute story, right?

  • But I'm not sharing this story because it's cute.

  • I'm sharing it because it's particularly interesting when you study the behavior of our society

  • because when people are driving down the road

  • and a duck or chicken or a family of geese are trying to cross the road

  • that's usually what happens people stop

  • and they wait and they watch and admire them

  • Oh, that's too cute.

  • Their cuteness, their spunkiness,

  • how they walk, their little faces and beaks.

  • But then drive three blocks down

  • to the nearest fast food joint and order some chicken nuggets or a junior chicken burger.

  • We desire to see the chicken safely make it to the other side of the road,

  • yet not only participate in the confinement and slaughter of millions of chickens every year

  • but say and do absolutely nothing when they are violated

  • and pieces of their body are dismembered, fried,

  • and then put on menus with adjectives like juicy succulent and crispy.

  • So what I want to know is

  • if we wouldn't just keep driving and run over the chicken when we don't have to,

  • how come we're okay with this?

  • How can we pay and give our money and support to this when we also don't have to?

  • Chickens and turkeys raised for meat have been bred to grow so large so quickly

  • that many suffer crippling leg disorders, chronic joint pain and even fatal heart attacks.

  • Sick or injured birds often have their necks broken.

  • Others are clubbed to death.

  • Those who live to reach market weight

  • are thrown into transport crates and

  • loaded onto trucks bound for slaughter plants.

  • Handling is often violent

  • and frequently causes bruises, broken bones and other injuries.

  • At the slaughter plant, the birds are dumped from their crates

  • then roughly snapped upside down into moving shackles by their fragile legs.

  • From there, the birds are dragged through an electrified vat of water

  • which renders them paralyzed but not necessarily unconscious.

  • They are then pulled across the blade

  • which slices their throats, causing blood to pour from their necks.

  • Some of the birds who missed the blade

  • have their throats slit or their heads ripped off by a backup killer.

  • Other birds are drowned and scalded in the tanks of hot water designed to loosen the birds feathers.

  • It just blows my mind

  • that the only difference between some beings, such as a chicken

  • being safe and guided and looked after and waited for and protected

  • or being confined, abused, neglected, violated and slaughtered

  • is whether or not they're on a road or in a building that we don't have access to.

  • Why, people, why?

  • Here's why.

  • Habit.

  • Addiction.

  • Peer pressure.

  • Convenience

  • and taste.

  • And none of those are a necessity.

  • Was it that this is just a really lucky chicken?

  • Or that we're not actually putting our moral instinct into action?

  • And that we've got a little catching up to do

  • with what we pay for and how we let other people treat beings

  • that we have the instinct to protect.

  • Because honestly,

  • if during that traffic jam

  • I went into the middle of the road and picked up the chicken by its leg

  • and slit it's throat

  • I think there'd be a lot of traumatized children

  • and a lot o traumatized and angry adults

  • that would get out of their cars and say "What are you doing?"

  • and I would say:

  • I'm just doing what's done every day all around the world

  • I'm just doing what you pay for

  • I'm just doing what you have accepted your entire life to this innocent being that doesn't wanna die.

  • Just some food for thought. Tell me what you think.

My name is Erin and this is food for thought.

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B1 US chicken road slaughter dispatcher slit traffic jam

Food For Thought

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    羊奶 posted on 2018/01/29
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