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  • Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo.

  • Ex my...

  • "Neither you nor your hairy-ass friend can come to my party!"

  • E! That's so rude.

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Today's lesson is going to be on correlative conjunctions, or let's say conjunctive pairs

  • to make it simple.

  • Mr. E made a statement where he said two things using two words to bring two statements together,

  • two related ideas and brought them together.

  • In this case: "you" and "your hairy-ass friend".

  • I want to go to the board and I want to explain the correlative conjunctions to you, because

  • I know conjunctions you've heard of, but this will be a little twist that can add to your

  • English to make it more advanced. Are you ready?

  • Let's go to the board.

  • All right, so E talked about correlative conjunctions, and what I want to do is just go over conjunctions

  • basically to you. Okay?

  • So, conjunctions like: "for", "so", "because", "and", and "or" are easy.

  • You know, they're everyday words.

  • You say them regularly.

  • "My friend and I", "You", or "Him", or "Her". Right?

  • And we use these to join words, clauses, and phrases together. Right?

  • "The people I saw and my best friends were happy."

  • Okay?

  • So, a correlative conjunction is the same kind of thing as, like, your joining statements,

  • but they're of... Sorry.

  • "Of", not "or".

  • Of related information.

  • And when they come together...

  • When I say pairs, it's like imagine a boy and a girl together and they're a happy couple,

  • they work together.

  • Okay?

  • So, "either", "or" is one of the first examples.

  • You've seen "either". Right?

  • Or you've seen "or", but what I want to talk about is "either", "or".

  • In "either", "or" it gives you a choice.

  • "Either you pay me the money now or I break your legs."

  • You have a choice; whether you like that choice or not, it's a choice.

  • The second one is also...

  • Is: "not only", "but also".

  • It's about surprise.

  • In the first case we're saying: "Not only was she happy"-there was a surprise-

  • "but she also got married", there's even more surprise.

  • So, in this correlative pair we talk about the idea of surprise.

  • You put this plus this, there's a surprise, plus more surprise.

  • In our third case we talk about negation.

  • That's what I was talking about, Mr. E here said: "Not you, nor your friend".

  • A lot of students have a problem with "neither", "nor" or "neither", "nor".

  • By the way, they're the same thing.

  • You'll hear people say: "Neither this" or "nor".

  • My idea on that or my take on that is this: A lot of educated people will say: "Neither",

  • and it's more British.

  • And Americans tend to say: "Neither" more.

  • Is there really a grammatical difference?

  • Not at all, but just keep that in mind that if you hear someone say: "Neither" they probably

  • have gone to university, a little bit more educated, and "neither" is just more commonplace.

  • It's not better, it's not worse, it's just a preference in style. Okay?

  • But when you say "neither"...

  • "Neither", "nor", it means not this and not that.

  • It's not a choice.

  • People confuse "either", "or" because you have a choice.

  • This means: This is not true and that's not true, so both are not true anymore.

  • Cool? Keep that in mind.

  • It makes everything negative.

  • And finally: "both", "and" is inclusive or including.

  • You know: "Both my brother and my father love baseball."

  • So I'm taking two, right?

  • "Both", my brother, I am saying there are two parts, and the secondary part is included

  • with the first part, so it's an including. Cool?

  • Now, we've got the basic lesson down.

  • We're going to go to the board, of course you know I'm going to give you a bit of a quiz.

  • I hope you understand.

  • I'll go over it quickly for you once again just in case.

  • "Either", "or" is choice; "not only", "but also" is surprise and it's two surprises,

  • the first case is a surprise, the second one is even more of a surprise; "neither", "nor"

  • is negation, meaning no, x, nothing, no; and "both", "and" is included, so you're including

  • this with that, both she and he were happy. Right? Cool?

  • All right, so once again we're going to do our magic board.

  • Got to do a little bit of a quiz, and I'll give you a little bit extra on conjunctions

  • in just a second.

  • [Snaps]

  • Okay, so you'll remember we were talking about, you know, correlative conjunctions, and what

  • I want you to do just before I got to the quiz, because I said we were doing a quiz

  • -which is true-I want to show you how they work in sentences

  • because I explained it to you, but

  • I think one picture is worth a thousand words, so we're going to do, well, four pictures.

  • Okay?

  • So, here are some conjunction examples.

  • Four markers to make it clear, okay?

  • So: "They told me to either buy the shoes or put them back."

  • So in this case you can see the choice, you can buy or put them back, but you have to

  • do one or the other.

  • Okay? And that's what the "either" is indicating here.

  • "Either buy this one or put them back."

  • That is your choice.

  • Okay?

  • Let's do the next one: "Not only did it smell", okay just to let you know, when you say something

  • smells in English, it's not usually positive.

  • We talk about a scent, someone has a pleasant scent, not a pleasant smell.

  • Okay?

  • So: "Not only did it smell", that's my first part, it's like: "It smelled. I didn't expect it to smell".

  • "...but it also tasted funny".

  • So, I'd give you an example of a hamburger.

  • I expect a hamburger to taste a certain way, but if the hamburger had a smell I'd be surprised.

  • It shouldn't smell like fish, but then it tasted funny.

  • It tasted like, I don't know, licorice.

  • Not only was I surprised the first time.

  • Remember I told you?

  • The second one indicates even a greater surprise.

  • Something looked a certain way, but tasted or felt a different way.

  • Okay?

  • So here we're looking at surprise and I'm showing you how these show surprise and greater surprise.

  • Let's look at number three, okay?

  • "The dog neither ate nor slept at night."

  • So, it neither ate...

  • Okay? So it didn't eat.

  • But I'm not even just saying it didn't eat, I'm also going to say it didn't sleep.

  • So, instead of...

  • And let's go back to number one where you have a choice of buying it or putting away.

  • In this case you don't get to eat and you don't get to sleep, neither thing is true.

  • You don't get to do either one, and that's why it's a negation.

  • Okay?

  • Both are taken away from you.

  • Here you're offered a choice, here you show surprise, but in this one you get nothing;

  • you don't get this and you don't get that.

  • Now, finally we have: "Mr. E was both funny and modest about his adventures."

  • Well, we're saying the two are together.

  • In this case he was funny and...

  • If I'm going to go back to, don't tell anybody, but we'll go back to a simple conjunction

  • "and" because you know "and" means both things are truth.

  • This is just saying here the inclusion is both, meaning two things.

  • So it's telling you right at the beginning there are two things that are true; one is

  • being funny, the other is being modest, and we're including them together to make it a

  • stronger statement.

  • So instead of just saying: "He was funny and this", we're saying:

  • "He was both funny and modest", stronger statement and it's inclusive or including.

  • Do you like that?

  • Cool.

  • Now we've gone through all four sentences, I'm going to test your knowledge because you

  • have examples of it, you know what it means - let's see how well you do on the quiz.

  • Let's start with number one.

  • "Not only"... Oops, sorry.

  • "Not only was it"...

  • Sorry.

  • "Not only was it of great quality but it was also cheap."

  • Would it be A, B, C, or D?

  • Okay.

  • Before I put it on the board, let's go to number two.

  • "Both the man and his dog were stupid."

  • Sorry.

  • I don't know where that came from, but I liked it so I wrote it down.

  • "Both the man and his dog were stupid."

  • Okay?

  • So I want...

  • Once again I'm going to step back, I want you to take a look at your choices and figure out which...

  • Where it goes. Okay?

  • Okay, number three: "Neither the woman nor the man were happy with the answer."

  • Once again, which one do you think would be the correct one?

  • Inclusion, choice, negation, or surprise?

  • And finally, we have this one: "Either you watch the program or we turn off the television."

  • Okay, so you've had time to think about it.

  • Let's go to the answers and see which one it would be.

  • Now, number one was: "Not only was it of great quality but it was also cheap."

  • That sounds like a surprise, right?

  • "Not only was it of great quality but it was also cheap", so that one goes here.

  • D1 is here.

  • Surprise, I was surprised at the quality and the cost.

  • Right?

  • Now let's look at...

  • Take a look at number two: "Both the man and his dog were stupid."

  • I know it's a bad sentence, but I just kind of like it.

  • Okay.

  • Both.

  • Well, it seems I'm including the man and his dog together, right?

  • That would be inclusion. Right?

  • So, inclusion, so we're going to go here with number 2.

  • Inclusion or included.

  • How about this one: "Neither the woman nor the man were happy with the answer"?

  • So not this one and not that one, I think that would be...

  • What do you think that would be?

  • Yeah, I made that one easy, here we go, 3, negation. Right?

  • Both of them were not happy.

  • And finally, we know the answer is choice, let's go down to number four:

  • "Either you watch the program or we turn off the television."

  • All right?

  • Number 4.

  • And there we have our answers.

  • How did you do?

  • Did you get all four correct?

  • If not, we should go back...

  • Go back to the beginning, watch the explanation, and then look at the example sentences

  • I have over here-right?-to make sure you understand properly.

  • Now, time for me to get going.

  • I've got a bit of pairing to do myself.

  • Do you know what I mean? [Clicks tongue].

  • Okay, anyway, before I go I just want to say: Thank you very much for watching the video.

  • Please go to engVid, because if you know, when you go to engVid you'll notice that I

  • actually did another video on comma girl and I think it was...

  • Comma girl and conjunction boy, so that's, you know, in greater detail on that.

  • Anyway, and we have...

  • Also have other information from other teachers doing the same thing.

  • But I want to say thank you once again, and I'm going to say go to www.engvid.com,

  • where you can see my video and other ones, and don't forget to subscribe;

  • push that button, press that screen, whatever you've got to do.

  • All right?

  • Have a good one.

Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

A2 US surprise choice inclusion smell funny conjunction

English Grammar: Correlative Conjunctions (NEITHER & NOR, EITHER & OR, BOTH & AND...)

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    Nadia Huang posted on 2017/11/13
Video vocabulary