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  • THE GLADIATOR OF ROME

  • English subtitles by David Blake (2013)

  • Under the rule of the cruel Emperor Caracalla, the City of Rome,

  • more intoxicated than ever with power, became the centre of many intrigues

  • that threatened the integrity of the mighty Roman Empire.

  • Frastus! How good to see you! - Greetings, Astarte.

  • Have you brought me news? - Yes.

  • This evening we are to meet a man who has information for us.

  • He's devious, but he knows the secrets of half of Rome.

  • Do you think he'll speak true? - It takes gold to make such men truthful.

  • You are the only person I can count on. Since I met you as legionnaires in Silesia.

  • Come and sit in the tavern with me.

  • We'll refresh ourselves with a cup of wine, and talk about old times.

  • Bring us some wine!

  • Happy days - when we served on the Eastern Frontier.

  • That's when Uras was only a tribal chieftain.

  • I remember the time he said to me...

  • But, tell me, Astarte, why are you trying to find the Princess Nisa?

  • Are you in love with her?

  • No...

  • Because you are like a brother to me, I will trust you.

  • I have to kill her! - Kill her?

  • Yes, by order of King Uras. I was the one who helped him

  • take the throne from King Arculeus. And now, I am rewarded like this -

  • Either the head of Princess Nisa! Or, it's my own! - That's terrible.

  • You can count on me for anything.

  • How beautiful Nisa was!... I can still see her, there with Arculeus.

  • We murdered all of the royal family. Except for Nisa. She managed to escape.

  • Today, Uras is afraid his enemies might restore her to power.

  • I cannot return to Silesia, unless I can take him that woman's head.

  • But how did Nisa manage to get away? - With a slave loyal to Arculeus.

  • A real giant - Marcus. It was a miracle he didn't crush us with his bare hands.

  • Drink up... And don't worry. You're about to complete your mission.

  • What is it? - Everything is in order.

  • The fodder has arrived, and the blacksmith has finished his work.

  • Very well. Valerius is leaving for Rome. Is his horse ready for him? - Yes.

  • Have it brought around to the front.

  • Also bring the chariot with the white horses. The Senator has to go out.

  • How are you, Marcus? - While I can work in peace, I'm well.

  • The master is pleased with your work. I heard him say he wants to reward you.

  • Reward me, why? - Because you cleared out the cellars in short order,

  • removing those enormous barrels that no-one else was able to budge.

  • That was nothing. For me, it was easy.

  • Do you ever get homesick for Silesia? - No, I couldn't feel safe there now.

  • Nisa. She is of noble birth, isn't she? - One's status in life is changeable.

  • Today she's a slave like myself. But I swore to her father I would protect her.

  • Well, Fate is kind to her now. And, if the Gods will, it will soon be kinder.

  • Thanks to the noble heart of our young master, Valerius.

  • And I love you, Valerius...

  • But I'm afraid. Your parents will never consent to our marriage.

  • You are the only son of one of the most illustrious families of Rome.

  • And I am only a slave-girl your mother bought in the slave market.

  • They won't ever let us marry. I will lose you forever.

  • No, we won't lose each other. My mother and father are kind people.

  • They will understand not to forbid our happiness.

  • And, when I return to you here... - You are leaving?

  • You're going to abandon us - again. - I must return to Rome immediately.

  • From there, I have to proceed to Brindisi with my legion.

  • When will you return? - I don't know.

  • But I promise I'll speak to my parents of our love as soon as I return,

  • and I'll ask them to give you freedom, and to consent to our marriage.

  • Publius! - Here comes your father.

  • I hope your visit to Macrinus will serve our purpose. - I trust it will.

  • Has the chariot been brought round?

  • It's time for you to go.

  • May the Gods watch over you, and now I have to leave you.

  • But first, I would like to speak... - Leaving so soon?

  • My son, who knows when I'll see you. - Soon, I hope.

  • This parting is not like the others. - Your father and I are most upset.

  • Who knows what is to become of us? - What do you mean, Mother?

  • We are accused of embracing Christianity. We face the threat of persecution.

  • Vezius Rufus has always envied our family. Now he is Praefectus of the Praetorians,

  • his spite may give way to unbridled fury. - But the Emperor would never allow an act

  • as unjust as that, against the family

  • that has contributed so greatly to Rome!

  • Caracalla only listens to Vezius Rufus, and the more he does, the worse he becomes.

  • Rome's best, accused of imaginary crimes, now fall beneath the feet of the Preaetorians.

  • And now they dare accuse even us, of embracing Christianity!

  • It's inconceivable that Caracalla believes this. - It seems that he does, my son.

  • I can't believe that the Emperor is as utterly blind and cruel as you say.

  • Now, don't worry.

  • How are you, Nisa? - I've never been so happy.

  • You tell me everything in Rome. Now I too must be on my way.

  • In Rome?! You'll be there? - Tomorrow I will see the Emperor,

  • and refute these absurd accusations. At least I'll make every attempt to,

  • but I'm not very hopeful. - Will the Senate give their support.

  • Certainly, but today I seek good counsel from Marcus Macrinus, at his villa nearby.

  • The Senators will oppose the merciless policies of Caracalla. But Marcus Macrinus

  • is the only Senator who can command the fear of that lunatic pack about Caracalla.

  • Here is the place.

  • There he is now!

  • Greetings, Frastus. - This is Septimius, the man we seek.

  • Let's sit, why don't we? We can talk more easily. There.

  • Two pitchers of the best Palermo!

  • Let's hear it. - I found where you can find the girl.

  • Where is she? - In one of the patrician's villas.

  • Where? - Not far, not more than a mile or so.

  • Take us there immediately! - But it's almost dark now.

  • Better to wait until daybreak. - I'm losing my patience.

  • Over two years now I've hunted for that miserable slave girl!

  • I sympathise. But after two years, you can wait a few hours longer.

  • If you knew what an effort, and cash, it cost me to get this information!

  • Do I take it you're not sure? You've not seen her with your own eyes?

  • No - but I trust the person who has. I'll lead you to her if...

  • you'll agree to another 100 sesterces.

  • 100 sesterces. You already gave him 100? - Yes, I did give them to him.

  • Come on now, what's a mere 100 sesterces to a General from Silesia!

  • Very well, finish the business quickly, and I'll give you another 100 sesterces.

  • But only when I have Nisa within my power! - Agreed.

  • And now, let's drink to the success of our little enterprise!

  • Stop, I say! What are you're doing!?

  • This is the home of a true Roman...!

  • Who gave the order for this?

  • Vezius Rufus, I warn you! Answer me now!

  • You will pay for this outrage!

  • How dare you! Call off your men!

  • Marcus! Marcus, help!

  • Don't let that one get away!

  • Help me!

  • Help me!

  • Restrain that man!

  • Marcus! Marcus!

  • Stop, you fools! That giant of a man is worth his weight in gold!

  • I want him alive.

  • Take him away.

  • Destroy everything, and remove everyone.

  • The slaves are confiscated, and now they belong to the State.

  • Move along, quickly!

  • Marcus Macrinus, why are you here?

  • I have come to witness your vengeance on Valerius and his family.

  • As Praefectus of the Praetorians, I've acted solely on orders from the Emperor.

  • I'm sure that Caracalla never ordered the death of these two.

  • Valerius and his wife were guilty of endorsing the outlawed sect of Christians.

  • I refuse to believe either was guilty of such an offence. They honoured the Gods!

  • Marcus Macrinus, you may bury the dead, but I advise you not to argue with me.

  • The Emperor knows well your rebellious spirit, and your words of hostility.

  • My words now protest this infamy. Recall to your Master's attention that

  • tyrants like him always have proved short-lived in Rome.

  • Now it's a flock of sheep! We'll never get there!

  • A little more patience! The villa is not far - no more than my 100 sesterces.

  • Let me pass - let me pass! I am Valerius the Younger.

  • No-one is allowed to enter here! - Out of my way!

  • Criminals! Murderers! Barbarians!

  • What is your explanation for this? - Leave this place at once, Valerius.

  • I sympathise with your feelings, but I am forced to obey orders.

  • I want to bury my parent's bodies. No power on Earth can prevent my doing so!

  • Senator Macrinus has arranged for their burial. - Murderous dogs!

  • You killed two innocent people savagely. Animals! Both you and your Commander!

  • But I'll take my revenge out on you! - Control yourself!

  • Assassins! My father was the truest and most faithful of Romans!

  • What you did here was butchery! - There is no point in shouting at me.

  • I'll shout in front of the Emperor, then! I refuse to serve in this army of cut-throats!

  • Stop it, Valerius. Get out of here before I'm forced to put you under arrest.

  • You and your pitchers of Palermo... If we'd started when I wanted to yesterday,

  • we'd have had the slave-girl! - But my information was correct, wasn't it?

  • Don't blame me if the Emperor decided to confiscate all of Valerius's belongings.

  • And my 100 sesterces? - Be off with you!

  • Astarte, there is still hope for you. You're the General of a friendly monarch.

  • Make an application to the Praefectus, asking to buy Nisa for yourself.

  • The Emperor wouldn't grant me an audience. He referred my complaint to the Praefectus.

  • What did you say to Vezius Rufus? - That it's simple justice I ask for!

  • That I won't serve in an Army that destroyed my entire family.

  • Imprudent. But with the best intentions. Yet, in practice, it's an ineffective

  • weapon in overthrowing a tyranny. He who tramples on the freedom of Rome,

  • won't find much time to vent his fury upon his free-born citizens.

  • The best men amongst us, even at the cost of their own lives,