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  • From rare Viking treasures to alien artifacts, here are 9 unbelievable coin discoveries!

  • 9.

  • The Wesley Carrington Hoard

  • In June 2013, a British man named Wesley Carrington made one of the most spectacular discoveries

  • of the century.

  • After buying a metal detector as a hobby, he used it in the woods near St. Albans, Hertfordshire.

  • Initially, he did pretty well, he found a spoon and a halfpenny.

  • And then he discovered a gold coin.

  • As the metal detector continued to beep even after finding the coin, he began to dig.

  • Soon, he unearthed 55 more gold Roman coins.

  • He took the coins to a local museum who inspected the coins and told him they dated back 1,600

  • years.

  • The coins - minted in Italy as well as in other parts of Europe - were in use during

  • the Empire of six Roman Emperors from Honorius to Gratian.

  • Carrington later admitted he used tricks he learned on YouTube to make the find but didn’t

  • really know how to use his metal detector.

  • He said it was the cheapest detector he could find so there is plenty of hope for everyone

  • out there who wants a cool hobby!

  • I bet there were plenty of other people who have super expensive metal detectors and have

  • never found anything, They are probably hating Carrington right now.

  • The coins are estimated to be worth over £100,000 ($128,000).

  • Plans were made to auction the coins but no information could be found as to how much

  • money Carrington received for his find.

  • 8.

  • Roman Coins in Japan

  • In 2013, a discovery was made that still baffles archaeologists.

  • Katsuren Castle in Okinawa Island, Japan, is a UNESCO World Heritage site and was built

  • around the 12th century.

  • During a dig, archaeologists discovered four copper coins that, at first, they took for

  • a hoax.

  • One of the coins bears the image of the Roman Emperor Constantine I and has since been dated

  • to 300 to 400 AD.

  • Another shows a helmeted soldier wielding a shield in one hand and stabbing an enemy

  • with a spear in the other.

  • Since that initial find, excavation has yielded another six coins, which may date back to

  • the Ottoman Empire in the late 17th century.

  • The find baffles archaeologists because of the lack of direct links to Europe.

  • History tells us that the castle had commercial relationships with China and other Asian countries,

  • so it’s possible the ancient Roman coins found their way to Katsuren through that route

  • although it would be pretty surprising!

  • 7.

  • The Seaton Down Hoard

  • In 2014, an amateur metal detectorist unearthed one of the largest hoards of Roman coins ever

  • found in Britain.

  • Laurence Egerton discovered 22,000 copper-alloy coins in Seaton, East Devon, near a field

  • where a Roman villa had been excavated.

  • Egerton took up metal detecting seven years prior to his find and the best he ever found

  • were some old shotgun cartridges.

  • At first, he only found two small coins on top of the ground.

  • His metal detector indicated iron but Egerton said his instincts told him there might be

  • something more.

  • After digging, he came upon two iron ingots but the shovel full underneath them didn’t

  • contain dirt but coins.

  • Now called the Seaton Down Hoard, experts believe a soldier or private individual buried

  • them for safekeeping.

  • For whatever reason, they never returned to collect the coins.

  • The coins would have made up a few month’s wages for a soldier.

  • Today, though, they are worth tens of thousands of dollars.

  • Egerton was so concerned about theft that for three days, after archaeologists went

  • home for the night, he camped out in his car to protect the dig site.

  • The Roman coins date back to 4th century and contain the representation of Emperor Constantine,

  • the members of his family, his predecessors, and successors.

  • 6.

  • Swiss Cherry Orchard Find

  • In 2015, a stash of more than 4,000 bronze and silver coins is believed to have been

  • buried some 1,700 years ago in what is today a cherry orchard in Aargau, Switzerland.

  • Weighing around 15kg (33lb), the local farmer discovered the coins after spotting something

  • shiny in a molehill.

  • Since a Roman settlement was discovered in the nearby town of Frick, just a few months

  • before, the farmer suspected the coins might be of Roman origin and contacted the regional

  • archaeological service.

  • After months of excavation, 4,166 coins were found in excellent condition.

  • The regional archaeological service called the coin trove one of the biggest such finds

  • in Swiss history.

  • Some of the coins date from AD 274 and the rule of Emperor Aurelian while other coins

  • come from the time of Emperor Maximian in 294.

  • Swiss archaeologist Georg Matter, who worked on the excavation, said what they found within

  • the first three days "exceeded all expectations by far".

  • 5.

  • Rare Gold Coin in Galilee

  • A woman, named Laurie Rimon, saw something shiny while hiking in Galilee, Israel with

  • friends in March 2016.

  • It was a 2000 years old coin, bearing the image of Emperor Augustus.

  • The coin dates back to 107 AD, after the Roman destruction of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem,

  • and was minted by Emperor Trajan as a series of coins to honor his predecessors.

  • Emperor Augustus reined from 27 BC to AD 14 and was considered divine after his death.

  • In fact, the coin refers to Augustus asDivine Augustus”.

  • The coin is extremely rare, with only one other known to exist.

  • Rimon, from a kibbutz in northern Israel, turned it over to the Israel Antiquities Authority.

  • No one is sure why this coin was in Eastern Galilee.

  • It would have been very valuable in its time period and too valuable for everyday use,

  • sort of like buying a soda with a hundred dollar bill.

  • Therefore, it may have been part of a larger collection of coins but no more have been

  • found.

  • 4.

  • Viking Coins in Belfast

  • In May 2016, a treasure hunter named Brian Morton discovered two extremely rare Viking

  • silver coins near Newcastle in County Down, Ireland.

  • The discovery of the Hiberno-Manx silver coins were a first for Northern Ireland, with less

  • than a handful found anywhere on the island during the last four decades.

  • Morton was searching on farmland with his metal detector but he said he had not been

  • looking for anything specific.

  • Morton found them under about a layer of mud.

  • The coins were mainly circulated in the Isle of Man and perhaps Scotland during the eleventh

  • century and are 93% silver.

  • They could have ended up in the area after being taken during a Viking raid on a nearby

  • monastery at Maghera, or they could have been the result of a trade or strategic link with

  • the Isle of Man and southeast Ulster.

  • A former curator at the Ulster Museum speculated that they were dropped by someone passing

  • rather than being deliberately hidden.

  • Coins were not used in Ireland before the Viking period and silver was the main form

  • of currency.

  • The coins were sent to the British Museum for independent valuation and the money from

  • auction will be split between Morton and landowner, which was also the case of the Wesley Carrington

  • find.

  • 3.

  • Large Hoard in Spain

  • In April 2016, construction workers on a site in the Andalusian town of Tomares, in Seville

  • province of Spain, uncovered 19 amphorae containing bronze Roman coins.

  • Amphorae are a type of Roman jug.

  • The workers made the find while digging a ditch to install electricity to a park.

  • The coins from the amphorae weighed in at more than 1,300 pounds (590kg) and date to

  • the 3rd century A.D.

  • What makes the find so spectacular is the sheer size.

  • Ana Navarro, head of the Archaeology Museum in Seville, said each amphora weighed so much,

  • a single person couldn’t have moved one alone.

  • Ten of the jugs were broken open while the trench was being dug.

  • The initial hypothesis is that the coins were to be used to pay taxes to the Roman Empire.

  • They were all in perfect condition because they were newly minted and never put into

  • circulation.

  • Care was taken to make sure there were no other surprises waiting in the dirt before

  • construction crews restarted their work.

  • 2.

  • The Saddle Ridge Hoard

  • In 2014, a couple in California walking their dog on their property noticed a rusted can

  • sticking out of the hillside.

  • They dug it out with a stick and carried the can home.

  • The cans aren’t the interesting part.

  • The interesting part is the fact that there was something inside the cans.

  • They went back to the site to find more.

  • What was in them?

  • A treasure trove of rare gold coins dating from 1847 to 1894, which have been valued

  • at $11 million.

  • One coin alone is worth $15,000 on its own and another has been valued at more than $1

  • million because of its rarity.

  • The collection consists of five dollar gold pieces, ten dollar gold pieces, and twenty

  • dollar double eagles.

  • Paper money was illegal in California until the 1870s, making it extremely rare to find

  • any coins from before that period.

  • Additionally, most of the coins are in mint condition.

  • Whoever stashed them did so immediately after they were minted.

  • Don Kagin, a numismatist who handled the sale and marketing of the coins, valued them.

  • Most of the coins were minted at the San Francisco Mint, according to Kagin.

  • What isn’t clear is how they were obtained or who hid them, though theories abound.

  • Some people have linked the coins to stagecoach bandit Black Bart, outlaw Jesse James, and

  • a theft at the San Francisco Mint.

  • However, none of the theories has panned out.

  • 1.

  • Alien Coins

  • A set of coins was found during a house renovation in Egypt depicting an alien head and a spaceship.

  • Another coin shows the head of an extraterrestrial being with huge eyes and bald head.

  • One of the coins hasOPPORTUNUS Adestcarved on the back, Latin forit’s here

  • in due time”.

  • If aliens actually did create these coins, why would they speak to ancient Egyptians

  • in Latin?To many this set of ancient coins is proof that aliens visited the Earth thousands

  • of years ago.

  • Many websites are pointing to Mysterious Earth as the source of breaking this story of the