Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • By the end of this year,

  • there'll be nearly a billion people on this planet

  • that actively use social networking sites.

  • The one thing that all of them have in common

  • is that they're going to die.

  • While that might be a somewhat morbid thought,

  • I think it has some really profound implications

  • that are worth exploring.

  • What first got me thinking about this

  • was a blog post authored earlier this year by Derek K. Miller,

  • who was a science and technology journalist

  • who died of cancer.

  • And what Miller did was have his family and friends write a post

  • that went out shortly after he died.

  • Here's what he wrote in starting that out.

  • He said, "Here it is. I'm dead,

  • and this is my last post to my blog.

  • In advance, I asked that once my body finally shut down

  • from the punishments of my cancer,

  • then my family and friends publish this prepared message I wrote --

  • the first part of the process

  • of turning this from an active website to an archive."

  • Now, while as a journalist,

  • Miller's archive may have been better written

  • and more carefully curated than most,

  • the fact of the matter is that all of us today

  • are creating an archive

  • that's something completely different

  • than anything that's been created

  • by any previous generation.

  • Consider a few stats for a moment.

  • Right now there are 48 hours of video

  • being uploaded to YouTube every single minute.

  • There are 200 million Tweets being posted every day.

  • And the average Facebook user

  • is creating 90 pieces of content each month.

  • So when you think about your parents or your grandparents,

  • at best they may have created

  • some photos or home videos,

  • or a diary that lives in a box somewhere.

  • But today we're all creating this incredibly rich digital archive

  • that's going to live in the cloud indefinitely,

  • years after we're gone.

  • And I think that's going to create some incredibly intriguing opportunities

  • for technologists.

  • Now to be clear, I'm a journalist and not a technologist,

  • so what I'd like to do briefly

  • is paint a picture

  • of what the present and the future are going to look like.

  • Now we're already seeing some services

  • that are designed to let us decide

  • what happens to our online profile and our social media accounts

  • after we die.

  • One of them actually, fittingly enough,

  • found me when I checked into a deli

  • at a restaurant in New York

  • on foursquare.

  • (Recording) Adam Ostrow: Hello.

  • Death: Adam?

  • AO: Yeah.

  • Death: Death can catch you anywhere, anytime,

  • even at the Organic.

  • AO: Who is this?

  • Death: Go to ifidie.net

  • before it's too late.

  • (Laughter)

  • Adam Ostrow: Kind of creepy, right?

  • So what that service does, quite simply,

  • is let you create a message or a video

  • that can be posted to Facebook after you die.

  • Another service right now

  • is called 1,000 Memories.

  • And what this lets you do is create an online tribute to your loved ones,

  • complete with photos and videos and stories

  • that they can post after you die.

  • But what I think comes next is far more interesting.

  • Now a lot of you are probably familiar with Deb Roy

  • who, back in March,

  • demonstrated how he was able to analyze more than 90,000 hours of home video.

  • I think as machines' ability

  • to understand human language and process vast amounts of data

  • continues to improve,

  • it's going to become possible

  • to analyze an entire life's worth of content --

  • the Tweets, the photos, the videos, the blog posts --

  • that we're producing in such massive numbers.

  • And I think as that happens,

  • it's going to become possible for our digital personas

  • to continue to interact in the real world long after we're gone

  • thanks to the vastness of the amount of content we're creating

  • and technology's ability to make sense of it all.

  • Now we're already starting to see some experiments here.

  • One service called My Next Tweet

  • analyzes your entire Twitter stream, everything you've posted onto Twitter,

  • to make some predictions as to what you might say next.

  • Well right now, as you can see,

  • the results can be somewhat comical.

  • You can imagine what something like this might look like

  • five, 10 or 20 years from now

  • as our technical capabilities improve.

  • Taking it a step further,

  • MIT's media lab is working on robots

  • that can interact more like humans.

  • But what if those robots were able to interact

  • based on the unique characteristics of a specific person

  • based on the hundreds of thousands of pieces of content

  • that person produces in their lifetime?

  • Finally, think back to this famous scene

  • from election night 2008

  • back in the United States,

  • where CNN beamed a live hologram

  • of hip hop artist will.i.am into their studio

  • for an interview with Anderson Cooper.

  • What if we were able to use that same type of technology

  • to beam a representation of our loved ones into our living rooms --

  • interacting in a very lifelike way

  • based on all the content they created while they were alive?

  • I think that's going to become completely possible

  • as the amount of data we're producing

  • and technology's ability to understand it

  • both expand exponentially.

  • Now in closing, I think what we all need to be thinking about

  • is if we want that to become our reality --

  • and if so,

  • what it means for a definition of life and everything that comes after it.

  • Thank you very much.

  • (Applause)

By the end of this year,

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 US TED archive content adam miller journalist

【TED】Adam Ostrow: After your final status update (Adam Ostrow: After your final status update)

  • 404 27
    Nemo posted on 2017/10/16
Video vocabulary