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  • Oh, thanks, Steve.

  • This is great.

  • I needed a new marker.

  • I really appreciate this.

  • Thank you so much.

  • You don't know how to say: "You're welcome"?

  • Well, it's a good reason we're here today, then.

  • Hey, everyone.

  • I'm Alex.

  • Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on:

  • "17 Ways to Say 'You're Welcome'".

  • Yes, after "Thank you", everyone knows you can say: "You're welcome", but there's more

  • than one way to do this.

  • I have thought of 17.

  • So, let's go through them one by one.

  • Of course, the first one which we have already said, which is in the title to the video, is:

  • "You're welcome."

  • Now, if you want to add a little more intensity to your "You're welcome", you could add an adverb.

  • Now, some of the most common adverbs to this are:

  • "You're very welcome.",

  • "You're quite welcome.",

  • "You are truly welcome."

  • And again, this is if you want to add a little bit more formality, a little bit more intensity

  • to your "You're welcome."

  • If you want to show that you are truly, truly welcome, you want to say: "You're welcome"

  • to the person a lot, you could say: "You're quite welcome."

  • Okay.

  • Next we have: "No problem.", "Not a problem.", "No problem-o.", "Any time."

  • This is a very casual, informal way to say: "You're welcome", where you want to say:

  • "That's okay, that's okay."

  • So, repeat after me: "No problem.",

  • "Not a problem.",

  • "No problem-o.",

  • "Any time."

  • "Any time", of course means: "You don't have to say thank you.

  • I would do this any time, any time at all."

  • Now, next we have: "Don't mention it.", "Don't worry about it.", "No worries."

  • Basically: "You don't have to say thank you.

  • It's okay."

  • So, we have: "Don't mention it", meaning, like, don't talk about it ever.

  • Don't say thank you.

  • You don't have to say thank you.

  • It's not necessary to say thank you.

  • It's very casual.

  • Now, you can also say: "Don't worry about it."

  • And you can say: "No worries."

  • All three of these, it's a very, very similar meaning, very similar informal level

  • of "You're welcome."

  • And another one: "Ah, it's nothing.", "It was nothing."

  • So, for example, Steve gave me this marker.

  • He probably paid not a lot of money for this marker, but it's the thought that counts.

  • It's the thought that counts for this one.

  • But, you know, if I say: "Thanks, Steve."

  • he can say: "Ah, it was nothing."

  • It's a small, little thing. Okay?

  • So you can say: "It's nothing."

  • in the present or: "It was nothing."

  • if the action happened in the past, which, you know, typically it did.

  • Next, you have: "With pleasure."

  • or "My pleasure."

  • So this is a little bit more formal, a more formal way to say: "You're welcome."

  • So, if someone says, you know:

  • "Thank you for this very thoughtful birthday gift.",

  • or "Thank you for helping me look for a new house.",

  • or something like this, and you can say: "With pleasure.",

  • or "It was my pleasure.",

  • or "It's my pleasure.",

  • or just "My pleasure."

  • Okay?

  • All right, so we have these ones here.

  • We're going to move over to this side of the board, and these are a little bit more interesting,

  • a little bit longer ways to say: "You're welcome", where you're not saying: "You're welcome" exactly.

  • But if someone says: "Ah, thanks. Thank you."

  • you can say: "Anything for you."

  • That I would do anything for that person.

  • Now, you know, you might say: "Anything for the team."

  • if, you know, you bought pizza for your soccer team, for example.

  • Or: "Anything for the company."

  • Very few people probably say that, but you could say: "Anything for the company.",

  • "Anything for the team.", "Anything for you.",

  • "Hey, anything for Gerald", or "Anything for Martha."

  • You know? If you're helping a friend.

  • And similar, you can say:

  • "Anything to make you (or him, or her) happy", or "smile".

  • Or this is very bad if you're...

  • Want to be like, you know, really stick it to someone and you can say:

  • "Anything to make him suffer."

  • It's not really a positive way to say: "You're welcome", but if they say:

  • -"Thanks for, you know, taking care of that bad situation and thanks for making him cry."

  • you can say: "Anything to make him suffer" or "her suffer".

  • That's a terrible, terrible thing.

  • Don't... Don't do that. Please don't do that.

  • You know, say: "Hey, anything to make mom smile.",

  • "Anything to make, you know, your cousin happy."

  • Something like that, that's a nice way to say: "You're welcome." Use those.

  • Next, so imagine that, you know, your friend has a birthday party and you helped to organize

  • it, you helped to buy the balloons, or you helped to put together the tables, or you

  • made the cake, and they say: "Thank you so much for helping with the party."

  • You can say: "I'm happy to help."

  • or: "I was happy to help.", "Don't mention it.

  • I was happy to help."

  • Okay, next one.

  • Here we have in the States... Oh, I'm going to...

  • I erased this with my jacket a little bit, so I'll add some purple to it.

  • In some parts of the United States, like I've heard in Michigan or Colorado, some people

  • instead of saying: "You're welcome" will just say: "Uh-huh."

  • It's weird to me, but some people do say it.

  • So, just repeat after me: "Uh-huh."

  • It's easy. Right?

  • So if someone says: "Hey, thanks for the gift.", "Hey, thanks for your help."

  • you can say: "Uh-huh." if you're in Michigan or Colorado and other parts of the US.

  • I would probably stick to, like: "Don't worry about it.", "No problem.",

  • "Don't mention it.", "It was nothing."

  • And finally...

  • Again, my jacket keeps rubbing out these words.

  • I'm really sorry, guys.

  • So: "Don't mention it.

  • You would have done the same for me."

  • So, this means that: "Hey, you don't have to say thank you.

  • I know that if you were in my situation you would have done the same thing for me."

  • All right, so before we finish this let's just quickly repeat these phrases.

  • And you can just repeat after me so that we know how to say these 17 ways to say:

  • "You're welcome."

  • Here we go.

  • "You're welcome.",

  • "You're very welcome.",

  • "No problem.",

  • "Not a problem.",

  • "No problem-o.",

  • "Any time.",

  • "Don't mention it.",

  • "Don't worry about it.",

  • "No worries.",

  • "It was nothing."

  • Are you using the intonation I'm using?

  • That's important, too.

  • "With pleasure.",

  • "It was my pleasure.",

  • "Anything for you.",

  • "Anything to make him smile.",

  • "I was happy to help.",

  • "Uh-huh.",

  • "You would have done the same for me."

  • Perfect.

  • Now, if you'd like to test your understanding of this material, as always, you can check

  • out the quiz on www.engvid.com.

  • And if you enjoyed this video, as always, like it, subscribe to the channel, comment

  • in the comments section below, check me out on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Until next time, pick a phrase, pick a phrase.

  • You ready with a phrase?

  • Thanks for clicking.

  • Yeah, you got it. You got it.

Oh, thanks, Steve.

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A2 US pleasure problem mention happy repeat marker

17 ways to say "YOU'RE WELCOME" in English-engVid Alex

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    洪巧蓉 posted on 2017/09/09
Video vocabulary