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  • My name is Sam Suzuki.

  • I recently took a trip to Tokyo with my dad.

  • We filmed our journey, and I've put together what I think are the fifteen coolest things

  • you can do and see in Tokyo.

  • Here we go.

  • We finally arrived at Tsukiji Fish Market, so we're gonna head in there, and see what's what

  • Tsukiji is the largest fish market in the world.

  • Its outer market consists of about 330 food stands, restaurants, and retailers.

  • Minced fish, cheese, and wrapped in bacon.

  • Oh wow!

  • It's a soy sauce based ramen.

  • The variety and quality of street food available in the outer market is amazing.

  • Many tourists stand in line for up to three hours to eat a sushi breakfast at particular

  • sushi places, which are good.

  • My recommendation is to save your valuable time and eat at the other food stalls at Tsukiji.

  • This was a popular stand selling massive fresh grilled scallops, shelled and cooked before

  • your eyes.

  • This custard mochi with fresh strawberry was one of the best things I've ever eaten in

  • my life!

  • Alright, we just finished up roaming around the outer market.

  • So now we're gonna head into the inner market to do some more exploring.

  • The inner market is the wholesale area and is closed to tourists until 10 am.

  • By that time most of the wholesalers are cleaning up and preparing to close for the day.

  • Even so, you can still see a stunning variety of seafood on display.

  • Fish head!

  • When visiting after 10 am, be alert of what is happening around you to avoid blocking

  • traffic.

  • Yeah, don't stare into space or bury your face in a book in the middle of traffic at

  • Tsukiji.

  • A couple of other things to keep in mind about Tsukiji.

  • First, the live tuna auction is a cool thing to see, but you'll need to arrive at 4 am

  • or earlier to wait in line for a ticket.

  • So keep that in mind when planning.

  • Second, get here soon.

  • Tsukiji Market is expected to close and move to a new site in the near future.

  • If you're lucky enough to travel to Tokyo soon, be sure to see this one of a kind place

  • while it still exists.

  • No sushi, no life.

  • OH WOW!

  • There's no better place in the world to do karaoke than Tokyo.

  • Many places have costumes available at no extra charge, if you want to get your cosplay

  • on while singing.

  • You need to grab a private mic for next time.

  • That was my first karaoke experience.

  • It was pretty amazing for everyone around that heard me singing at least.

  • Stupid!

  • No, it was super fun.

  • Super fun to sing those songs.

  • Awesome.

  • We may have to come back.

  • That's how fun it was.

  • Karaoke establishments usually open from around 11 am to 3 am the following morning.

  • In the movie Lost in Translation, my dad tells me, this is the same karaoke joint that was

  • ... that they shot the movie there.

  • So, if you're old, FYI.

  • Two of the most popular chains are Big Echo and Karaoke Kan, with locations across Tokyo.

  • Two hours will run you between 8 to 35 dollars, depending on the time of day, plus the cost

  • of food and beverage.

  • Ginza!

  • Ginzaaa!

  • Ginza is Tokyo's most famous upscale shopping, dining and entertainment district.

  • Some of the best department stores in the world are here as well.

  • Don't miss the basement levels called 'depachika,' which feature just about every beautiful and

  • delicious food you can imagine.

  • Those are 54 dollars, for the these grapes.

  • These are 10 dollars each.

  • These Hello Kitty apples are 10 dollars each, almost 11 dollars each.

  • In addition to housing bare-bottom Sanrio characters, Ginza is the home of the Nakagin

  • Capsule Tower.

  • The building was the world's first example of capsule architecture.

  • It was featured recently in the movie The Wolverine, where it is fictitiously depicted

  • as a love hotel.

  • We're at Uniqlo in Ginza to make our final purchases before we head home.

  • No trip to Ginza would be complete without a visit to Uniqlo.

  • The brand has been expanding to the US market, but its flagship store in Ginza has a massive

  • collection of cool t shirts on the top floor.

  • Many are available only at the Ginza location.

  • I love grabbing these t shirts for family and friends, because at 10 to 20 bucks each,

  • these make perfect souvenirs, especially the shirts with Japanese designs and fabrics.

  • Uniqlo, magic for all, bud.

  • I don't even know.

  • I'm trying it.

  • As it turns out, who's the premium boss?

  • Whoever that guy is.

  • Some old guy.

  • That's Tommy Lee Jones.

  • Tommy Lee Jones.

  • Why would I know that?

  • Let's vitamin, Sam.

  • Let's vitamin.

  • I've gone with the Real Gold Flavor Mix here.

  • Here are some other interesting drinks.

  • Bionic Ace.

  • Jungle Man.

  • Sam is going to try this corn beverage at some point.

  • You need to.

  • You just need to try it.

  • So when normal ice cream just doesn't cut it, you can get some Coolish or some Crunky.

  • Vending machines are everywhere in Tokyo.

  • Be adventurous and try something weird.

  • You'll be pleasantly surprised.

  • I don't know.

  • I can't seem to find this place.

  • It must be tucked away somewhere . . . I don't know, somewhere . . .

  • Oh, wow!

  • The Robot Restaurant in Shinjuku is total sensory overload.

  • You're brought into a waiting area with a live band in robot wardrobe.

  • Led down very subtly decorated hallways and to your seat.

  • And then the insanity begins.

  • Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Robot Restaurant, yay!

  • What is that huge shark?

  • We are looking forward to see you again.

  • Thank you!

  • Arigato gozaimasu!

  • We just finished at the Robot Restaurant.

  • I don't quite know how to describe it.

  • You have to come see it for yourself.

  • Even then, I don't think you'll able to comprehend the complete madness.

  • We are currently at Meiji Jingu shrine.

  • As you can see, the tori gate behind me is simply amazing.

  • Meiji Jingu is a shinto shrine dedicated to the spirit of Emperor Meiji, the first emperor

  • of modern Japan.

  • He ascended to the throne in 1867 and began the era known as the Meiji Restoration.

  • The shrine and forest area were completed in 1920, using approximately 100,000 trees

  • donated from regions all across Japan.

  • Playing some Pokemon Go, in Japan.

  • It's the real deal.

  • So I just got my omikuji, which is a poem fortune telling.

  • Okay, so the way that you do omikuji is you get a box right over there.

  • And you shake it up, and there's sticks inside.

  • And you draw out a stick, and it will have a number on it.

  • And then you'll tell the lady your number, and she'll bring you one of these little papers

  • with your fortune inside.

  • It's pretty . . . sounds like me, so . . . Walking down the peaceful paths of Meiji Jingu,

  • you almost forget you're in the most populated city in the world.

  • We just arrived in Akihabara, otaku central as it is known by some people.

  • And we're gonna go see what it's all about.

  • Akihabara is the center of Japan's otaku culture.

  • Electronics shops ranging from super-specialized tiny stalls to massive electronics retailers

  • line the streets around Akihabara.

  • There's just every kind of wire you can imagine!

  • There are countless shops devoted to anime and manga, video games, and collectibles of

  • every kind.

  • If you're looking for the weird and wacky, Akihabara won't disappoint.

  • Google kan-cho for some additional bewilderment.

  • Akihabara is also home to the famous maid cafes, and that imagery is reflected throughout

  • the area.

  • We've been about a block, and there's been three Sega multi-level arcades.

  • So we're gonna head to the one at the end of the block.

  • It's Club Sega.

  • We're gonna see how it is.

  • Visiting an arcade in Akihabara is another mind bender.

  • The quality and variety of games available is worth the visit alone.

  • And the gaming skill and speed on display is truly next level.

  • Akihabara is also a great place to get some gachapon, which are vending machine dispensed

  • capsule toys.

  • They range from the bizarre to the familiar.

  • Oh, it's the one with his butt.

  • Oh, that's awesome!

  • That's ridiculous.

  • That's amazing.

  • I'm getting one.

  • Amazing!

  • What is this . . . where does it go?

  • On top of a water bottle.

  • That's disgusting.

  • That's awesome.

  • That's the best.

  • A common problem with gachapon is where do I put all of my tricks and trinkets and whatnot?

  • Well, if you have a handy fanny pack like this, there's no problem with fitting it all

  • in here.