Basic US 1992 Folder Collection
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In this American English pronunciation video, we're going to learn some Vietnamese cooking,
and you're going to study contraction of the verb TO BE.
One thing to note about these contractions is that no extra syllable is added. We'll
go over the pronunciations. You'll notice that some of them have two different pronunciations.
That's because there can be a reduced pronunciation. I do recommend that you use the reduced pronunciation.
Any time you can make a short word shorter it's going to add better rhythmic contrast
to your speech.
So, I am. I'm. I'm. You are. This can be 'your' or, better yet, let's reduce it, 'yer'. Notice
how quick it is. When we reduce it, it's going to be very, very fast, and it must be linked to
the next word. 'We are' can be 'we're', or 'we're', or, better yet, wur, wur. Reduced.
'They are' can be 'they're', or, reduced, thur. He is, she is, it is. This will be come he's,
she's, it's. Notice that the S in 'it's' is pronounced as an S sound, unvoiced. That's
because the sound before is the T, also an unvoiced sound. It's, it's. However, the S
in 'he's' and 'she's' is a Z sound. That's voiced, because the sound before, a vowel,
was voiced. He's, she's, it's. TS can be a tough sound, and I do have a video on how
to make that sound. So let's take a look at some contractions in everyday conversation.
>> Alright, Annie. So after you peel the cucumber, you're going to slice the cucumber into rounds.
And then you're going to flatten the rounds, and slice them lengthwise again to make it
into a nice julienne.
Did you notice the contraction of 'you are' to 'yer'? Yer, you're going to. Listen again.
>> Alright, Annie. So after you peel the cucumber, you're going to slice the cucumber into rounds.
And then you're going to flatten the rounds, and slice them lengthwise again to make it
into a nice julienne. >> How's this, HaQuyen?
>> It looks good, looks good, it's good.
How's this? How's, how's, zz, zz, with a Z sound. It's good. It is, it's, it's, with
that TS sound. Listen again.
>> How's this, HaQuyen? >> It looks good, looks good, it's good.
>> Well, if we look at the way Mark's chopping his mushrooms, we can see that he's doing
quite a good job of it. >> Thanks, HaQuyen.
Mark's, Mark's. The last sound of Mark's name is the K sound, unvoiced. So the apostrophe
S is also unvoiced. Ks, ks, Mark's, Mark's. We also heard 'he's', where the apostrophe
S is a Z sound. He's, he's, he's doing. Listen again.
>> Well, if we look at the way Mark's chopping his mushrooms, we can see that he's doing
quite a good job of it. >> Thanks, HaQuyen.
>> That's because she's a good teacher.
Here, Natalie, speaking of HaQuyen, said that's, that's, that's because, with the TS sound.
She's, she's a good teacher. She's a, she's a, where the apostrophe S is a Z sound. Listen
again.
>> That's because she's a good teacher. >> Well, I'm going to dice up this cucumber
as I was instructed. >> I'm going to keep dicing the mushrooms.
Here, both Annie and Mark said I'm gonna. So, they have contracted I AM and also reduced
'going to' to 'gonna'. I'm gonna. Notice how 'I'm' is the most stressed syllable in that
fragment. I'm gonna. That's because 'going' is a helping verb here, not the main verb.
The main verb is stressed. For example, Annie said 'I'm gonna dice'. I'm gonna dice, Stressing
'dice'. Listen again.
>> Well, I'm going to dice up this cucumber as I was instructed.
>> I'm going to keep dicing the mushrooms. >> Hey Annie, when are the noodles going to
be ready? >> They're going to be ready in about 10 minutes.
They're gonna. Did you hear how Annie reduced 'they're' to thur, thur, thur, they're gonna.
They're gonna be ready. Listen again.
>> Hey Annie, when are the noodles going to be ready?
>> They're going to be ready in about 10 minutes.
>> I think we're all set with the basil. >> Thanks, Lori.
We're all set. Did you hear Lori's reduction of 'we're' to wur, wur, wur, we're all set.
All set is a common idiom meaning ready, or not in need of anything. Here, she is saying
the basil is ready for the dish. I use it often at a restaurant, for example, when a
waiter asks if there is anything more I need. Nope, I'm all set, I'll say. Listen again.
>> I think we're all set with the basil. >> Thanks, Lori.
>> I love HaQuyen. She's such an effective teacher.
>> That's true. HaQuyen, thanks so much for teaching us how to make all this amazing food.
>> Thanks for coming and joining me to eat all this wonderful food.
>> Any time. We will eat your food any time. >> Yes, we will.
>> Love it.
She's, she's, she's such, with the apostrophe S pronounced as a Z. That's, that's true,
with the TS sound. Listen again.
>> I love HaQuyen. She's such an effective teacher.
>> That's true. HaQuyen, thanks so much for teaching us how to make all this amazing food.
>> Thanks for coming and joining me to eat all this wonderful food.
>> Any time. We will eat your food any time. >> Yes, we will.
>> Love it.
>> I'm crushing it over here, as you may be able to see.
>> He's crushing it. >> I'm adding noodles.
>> I'm adding tofu. >> I'm waiting for shrimp.
>> I'm adding bean sprouts.
I'm. Lots of I'm in this clip. Also Mark used the idiom 'to crush' -- meaning he thinks
he is doing an excellent job of making a summer roll. There are lots of different ways to
use the word 'crush'. For example to say you have a crush on someone means you like that
person, you have romantic interest in that person. Let's listen again to all these I'm
contractions.
>> I'm crushing it over here, as you may be able to see.
>> He's crushing it. >> I'm adding noodles.
>> I'm adding tofu. >> I'm waiting for shrimp.
>> I'm adding bean sprouts.
>> That chicken's looking good.
That chicken's looking good. Natalie contracted 'chicken is' to chicken's, that chicken's
looking good. And it was good. It was delicious! Listen again.
>> That chicken's looking good.
>> There is onion in there. >> There's no onion in there.
>> I... >> That one's mine.
>> Wait, where's the onion? Oh, spring onion.
There's no onion in there, where's the onion. There's, where's. Both of these words end
in the R sound, a voiced consonant, so the apostrophe S is a Z sound. There's, there's.
Where's, where's. There's no onion, where's the onion. Listen again.
>> There is onion in there. >> There's no onion in there.
>> I... >> That one's mine.
>> Wait, where's the onion? Oh, spring onion.
>> Annie, hold it up. >> Look at that. That's absolute perfection.
>> It does look great.
You've got to love Annie's enthusiasm. That's absolute perfection. That's, that's, again,
with the TS sound. Listen again.
>> Annie, hold it up. >> Look at that. That's absolute perfection.
>> It does look great.
>> Oh god, my dogs are barking. >> Why is that, Hillary?
>> We've been walking around all day. >> Not to mention all the dancing you did
last night. >> Oh, it was amazing.
My dogs are barking. This is a great idiom to mean your feet are tired. My dogs are barking.
Notice how the word 'are' is reduced to er, er, er, My dogs are, my dogs are. My dogs
are barkin'. Notice also the ING is pronounced as an IN. My dogs are barkin' instead of dogs
are barking. You may find this happening sometimes with certain phrases or idioms. Listen again.
>> Oh god, my dogs are barking. >> Why is that, Hillary?
>> We've been walking around all day. >> Not to mention all the dancing you did
last night. >> Oh, it was amazing.
I hope this has made you more aware of just how often we use this kind of contraction.
Watch this video a time or two. Then watch an American TV show or movie, and see if you
can notice these 'to be' contractions. Write them down as you watch and practice the phrases.
Using contractions will really help your speech sound more natural.
That's it, and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.
Guys, that was fantastic.
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TO BE Contractions -- American English Pronunciation

1992 Folder Collection
Sam Sam published on July 2, 2017
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