Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • On this episode of China Uncensored,

  • is it Korean War II?

  • No, of course not.

  • The first Korean war technically never ended.

  • Hi, welcome to China Uncensored.

  • I’m your host Chris Chappell.

  • North Korea is trolling China.

  • Maybe even more than I do.

  • North Korea, a.k.a. the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,

  • a.k.a.

  • The True Korea

  • just launched a test of 4 missiles

  • three of which landed within 200 miles

  • of the Japanese coast.

  • Shooting missiles into the water!

  • That’s cause for celebration!

  • And believe me,

  • you don’t want to be the guy that breaks off a hug

  • prematurely with Kim Jong Un.

  • The North Korean missile launch

  • was designed to be as provocative as possible.

  • It comes as the US and South Korea

  • engage in annual military drills,

  • known as Foal Eagle.

  • A foal is a young horse.

  • You know, foal eagle.

  • Previous drills were named Puppy Toucan,

  • Porcupette Swan,

  • and of course, Goose Gosling.

  • Kim Jong-un,

  • North Korean leader and winner of his fraternity's

  • most outstanding brother award,

  • said earlier this year that he was in

  • the final state in preparations

  • for the first test of an intercontinental missile

  • that could strike the US.

  • Not on Donald Trump’s watch!

  • But it’s also a sign that for China,

  • North Korean relations are going south.

  • First, it comes during the not-to-be-politically-overshadowed

  • National People’s Congress.

  • It’s one of the biggest political events of the year,

  • as you can see from these extremely engaged delegates.

  • Hostess for the event are literally jumping for joy!

  • It’s an annual tradition.

  • I mean, what young woman wouldn’t be excited

  • to serve tea to an old horny toad?

  • But there’s another unintended consequence

  • of North Korea’s missile test

  • that has the Chinese regime up in arms.

  • "We should quickly finish the deployment of THAAD

  • and acquire a defense system against North Korea's

  • nuclear missiles."

  • Yes, THAAD!

  • China hates THAAD.

  • No, THAAD isn't the name of Xi Jinping's

  • least favorite fraternity brother.

  • THAAD stands for Terminal High Altitude Area Defense,

  • a missile defense system the United States

  • wants to build in South Korea.

  • What's that Shelley?

  • I see.

  • As of now,

  • it's a missile defense system that the US is

  • already building in South Korea.

  • Now you would think,

  • North Korea has promised to turn Seoul

  • into a sea of flames,

  • why would China be upset about South Korea

  • having a missile defense system?

  • Is it because it would be a provocative act

  • that might further escalate tensions

  • on the Korean Peninsula?

  • Well, partly.

  • But having a US-built missile defense and radar system

  • so close to China

  • might really cramp the Chinese regime's style

  • if they ever decide to launch missiles anywhere.

  • And so theyve been doing everything they can

  • to get South Korea to back down.

  • I mean, not that China is worried or anything.

  • As my favorite state-run media says,

  • the Chinese military could always blind or destroy THAAD

  • if it had to.

  • Yes, peaceful means are always preferred.

  • Otherwise we will crush you.

  • But what if we could crush you...peacefully?

  • You see, China is South Korea’s biggest trading partner.

  • A quarter of all Korean exports go to China,

  • almost double the United States.

  • So China could put a lot of economic pressure on South Korea

  • if it starts doing things the Chinese regime doesn’t like.

  • Not that they would, of course.

  • That’s just silly.

  • I mean,

  • just let one of the drones from China’s Foreign Ministry

  • reassure you!

  • "We welcome foreign companies,

  • including South Korean companies,

  • to invest and operate in China.”

  • See, nothing to worry about.

  • At the same time,

  • these companies must operate in accordance

  • with the law and compliance."

  • Oh no, never mind, theyre in trouble.

  • One in particular is in a Lotte trouble.

  • THAAD is going to be constructed on a golf course

  • in the country’s southeast

  • owned by South Korean mega conglomerate, Lotte.

  • When I was in South Korea last year,

  • I saw the Lotte name everywhere.

  • It’s involved in candy manufacturing,

  • fast food, retail, heavy chemicals,

  • IT, construction, entertainment,

  • and hotels, to name a few.

  • And the Chinese regime has been striking hard

  • at its operations in China

  • to retaliate against Lotte.

  • First, my favorite state run media,

  • the Global Times made a threat:

  • Since China cannot change Lotte’s decision,

  • Chinese society is also firmly determined

  • to let Lotte pay the price for its support

  • of the deployment of THAAD.”

  • Now, nearly two dozen Lotte retail stores in China

  • have been shut down.

  • And Lotte isn’t alone.

  • The Chinese regime knows how to wage economic warfare

  • to get what it wants.

  • We saw on Friday some of those shares,

  • including Hotel Shilla,

  • which gets 70% of its duty free sales from Chinese tourists,

  • tumbled more than 10%.

  • So it's a pretty significant impact,

  • especially for the parts of the South Korean economy

  • catered to Chinese tourists.”

  • So the Chinese regime is restricting tourism.

  • And launching cyberattacks.

  • Over in Japan,

  • an increasingly aggressive North Korea

  • has not gone unnoticed either.

  • "This launch has clearly indicated

  • that North Korea poses a new level of threat."

  • And that new level of threat

  • is part of the reason why Japan

  • has also been considering building a THAAD system

  • in Japan.

  • And the Chinese regime would love to see a

  • better defended and more

  • militarily active Japan.

  • So North Korea’s repeated missile and nuclear tests,

  • and China’s inability to rein them in,

  • are ruining the Chinese regime’s ability

  • to apply pressure on its neighbors.

  • Just a few weeks ago,

  • China announced it would stop buying coal from North Korea

  • til the end of the year.

  • Coal exports are considered a lifeline to North Korea,

  • one of the key things propping up the regime.

  • 90% of North Korean trade comes from China,

  • and coal is its biggest export.

  • But as these most recent missile tests show,

  • that didn’t stop North Korea’s aggression.

  • It’s strange, you know.

  • North Korea and China used to be like...

  • well, Mao Zedong said they were

  • as close as lips and teeth.”

  • But now it seems like someone might have bitten their lip.

  • Who’s to blame?

  • Well, the old horny toad.

  • Former leader Jiang Zemin fully supported North Korea.

  • And Jiang’s toadie, Zhou Yongkang,

  • continued to maintain the close relationship.

  • And he was even there for both Daddy Kim and Baby Kim.

  • But with China’s factional power struggle,

  • Jiang Zemin and Zhou Yongkang are on their way out,

  • and Xi Jinping is taking charge.