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  • This is a glass of water

  • colorless, tasteless.

  • It contains 100 gamma of LSD-25.

  • One tenth of a milligram.

  • The equivalent of one six hundredth of a grain.

  • An ounce of this material will make a 150,000 of such doses.

  • Let us observe the effect some three hours later.

  • Well, tell me.

  • I just couldn't, I couldn't possibly tell you.

  • It's here, can't you feel it?

  • This whole room.

  • Everything is in color

  • and I can feel the air

  • I can see it... I can see all the molecules.

  • I'm part of it... can't you see it?

  • I'm trying

  • Oh it's just like you are released

  • or you are free, or...

  • I don't know I can tell you...

  • I wish I could talk in technicolor or...

  • or let you see...

  • ...can you....

  • did you say you can see it?

  • no I can't quite see it, tell me about it

  • It's...

  • I can't tell you about it.

  • If you can't see it then you'll just never know it.

  • I feel sorry for you

  • It's almost impossible of course, as all the patients fail to describe it.

  • You can only say it isn't it isn't it isn't...

  • trying to tell people what it is.

  • Well I mean there are the colors and the beauties, the designs

  • the beautiful ways things appear.

  • People themselves, dull people - that I thought dull,

  • appear fascinating, interesting, mysterious, wonderful.

  • But that's only the beginning.

  • Suddenly you notice

  • that there aren't these separations,

  • that we are not on a separate islands shouting across to somebody else

  • and trying to hear what they're saying and misunderstanding them.

  • You know, you use the word yourself:

  • "Empathy"

  • This thing is flowing underneath, we are parts of a single continent;

  • It meets underneath the water,

  • and with that goes such delight,

  • the sober certainty of waking bliss.

  • One of the questions was could psychedelics be used for non-mystical problem solving,

  • for scientific, hard-nosed, data-rich stuff.

  • And the answers that we had at that time was nobody had any idea.

  • So we took senior scientists

  • and said to them we will give you a Psychedelic session

  • and the price of admission is a problem that you have been working on for at least three months

  • and are frustrated about, and matters to you a lot.

  • Their problems ranged from abstract scientific equations

  • to practical architecture and furniture-designs.

  • We gave them the psychedelic, we gave them some hours to just relax and be with themselves

  • and then we got them up and said it's time to work on your problems, and they dove in.

  • I took a trip through architectural history

  • and visited and saw various cities and places.

  • Each subject claimed that with focus and guidance.

  • LSD allowed them to approach their problem with a fresh perspective.

  • Or in-stealth them with the freedom to explore ideas more openly.

  • the result...

  • Patents issued, products built, theories extended and improved, papers published,

  • and more importantly

  • for many weeks there-after, according to the scientists, their overall level of creativity was up.

  • Bio-geneticist Dr.Kary mullis had won the nobel prize for inventing PCR

  • a revolutionary technique for multiplying tiny amounts of DNA

  • for use in genetic research;

  • A creative breakthrough he claims came from Psychedelic drug use.

  • I don't do experiments often

  • what if I had not taken LSD ever

  • would I have still invented PCR?

  • I don't know, I doubt it. I seriously doubt it.

  • It's not that psychedelics manufacture wonderment

  • or they can automatically make us more imaginative beings

  • but what psychedelics do is pull us so radically out of our comfort-zones

  • they decondition our thinking;

  • They thrust us out of everything we thought we knew about the world

  • in order to see things things as if for the first time and form new synaptic connections.

  • They change our context.

  • That's why people take psychedelics and they say "take a trip"

  • "take a trip" well look at the physical equivalent of that

  • Taking a trip means physically go somewhere you've never been before where no one knows your name

  • see the world differently

  • and jump into a new culture

  • I think it has to do with

  • forcing yourself to gain different perspectives and how you see reality.

  • You know reality is made of language.

  • and, so how you map your reality really matters; the words you used to map you reality.

  • and so i think that what psychedelics do is, I think they are tools

  • that's what I think

  • which is very different from just fully advocating their use.

  • I think that they are tools, they need to be treated with respect.

  • In 1965 the US government began shutting down

  • scientific studies across the country.

  • Fadiman's was one of them.

  • In the middle of our seventh session

  • around literally noon,

  • a certified letter arrived from the federal government.

  • We opened it and it said as of the moment of reading this letter

  • your research is terminated.

  • The research is over.

  • I held this letter and I looked around the room knowing that in the other room

  • we had four scientists

  • in the midst of a Psychedelic session with major problems on their minds

  • and i said to the group

  • Within five years the US government classified it as a schedule one drug

  • declaring that it had no medical value.

  • Research hit a brick wall and stopped.

  • and so that was the last research for about forty years.

  • As many as you know, I'm a great fan

  • and spokesman for Psilocybin,

  • for the Mushrooms.

  • The mushrooms that i am so stoked on

  • were discovered in 1953 by Gordon and Valentina Wasson, in Wattala

  • discovered in 53

  • made absolutely schedule one illegal in 1966.

  • 13 years

  • was the window

  • in which western civilization had to study this compound and figure out what it was for.

  • and they were just

  • beginning to focus upon it when it was made illegal

  • LSD discovered and 1937,

  • not brought into the scientific literature until 1948,

  • not generally available even in the laboratory until 1950,

  • made totally illegal in 1966.

  • 16 year window.

  • Think about the fact that when LSD was was legal

  • psychiatrists, professional researchers, were consistently reporting

  • cures of chronic alcoholism

  • with one 500gamma dose

  • one dose;like a fifty percent cure rate without recidivism

  • for chronic alcoholism.

  • spectacular findings were being reported.

  • When LSD swept through the scientific community

  • for pharmacologist, psychotherapists, psychiatrists

  • it had the same kind of excitement and feeling of breakthrough

  • that the splitting of the atom had for the Physics community in the late thirties.

  • we've had ... a mind programming excise called The War On Drugs for the last forty years

  • which has been designed to create an internal enemy in our societies

  • and convince people that there are these evil wicked groups who are doing these terrible sinful things

  • smoking these doing this and that

  • and there is a very dark image has been created around it

  • and people get very upset, irrationally, about this whole issue.

  • and actually what's being forgotten in all of this

  • and for me it's become... I regard it as an extremely important issue

  • is that when the state sends us to prison

  • for essentially exploring our own consciousness

  • This is a grotesque abuse of human rights.

  • it's a fundamental wrong

  • If I as an adult, am not sovereign over my own consciousness, then I'm absolutely not sovereign over anything

  • I can't claim any kind of freedom at all.

  • And what has happened over the last forty-fifty years under the disguise of the War On Drugs

  • is that we have been persuaded to hand over the keys of our consciousness to the state.

  • The most precious, the most intimate, the most sapien part of ourselves

  • the state now has the keys

  • and further more

  • they have persuaded us that that's in our interest.

  • This is a very dangerous situation.

  • One of the things that always freaks me out is

  • the people's inability to even consider that there is a difference between a Psychedelic experience on drugs

  • and a drug that's going to ruin your life.

  • They are not even interested in considering that possiblity.

  • It's like the same thing, it's like someone resisting...

  • Definitely, and again, let's remember,

  • that funded with our money, our tax-payer's money,

  • there has been forty years of programming; more than forty years

  • there has been forty years of programming; more than forty years on this subject

  • to make us all develop a kind of aversion, fear, hatred, horror of drugs.

This is a glass of water

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