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  • - Now, you may be asking yourself,

  • does Coyote Peterson always have a tiny turtle

  • in his pocket?

  • Well, not always.

  • But today, we're going to talk about the differences

  • between the turtle and the tortoise.

  • Say hello to Buckshot.

  • (adventurous tribal music)

  • (enchanting music)

  • Turtles.

  • Turtles.

  • Turtles.

  • For nearly 200 million years, a reptile

  • we all know as the turtle has inhabited our planet.

  • These cold-blooded ectotherms are protected

  • by a hard bony shell.

  • They breathe air,

  • and eat their food using a beak.

  • Of the 327 known species that exist today,

  • some live in water, while others can be found on land.

  • Since childhood, I have been fascinated

  • by these seemingly slow-moving creatures.

  • Yet to many peoples' surprise,

  • they're actually quite speedy,

  • especially when in the water.

  • But what about the land-dwelling, stumpy-footed,

  • slow-moving reptile that somehow defeated

  • that speedy rabbit?

  • Yes I am talking about the tortoise.

  • And the one question people are always asking.

  • Is a tortoise a turtle or is a turtle a tortoise?

  • Well, there is an answer to that question.

  • And to help us get to the bottom of this timeless mystery,

  • we're going to get the cameras up close

  • to one of the largest species in the world.

  • Okay, I hope everybody out there watching is excited,

  • because right here in this bag,

  • I've got a bunch of vegetables.

  • You guys know the vegetables are good for you, right?

  • - [Mark] Coyote, I don't think anybody's going to get

  • excited about vegetables, man.

  • - Well maybe you're not excited about the vegetables,

  • but you should be excited about who is going

  • to eat these vegetables.

  • You guys ready to see a giant tortoise?

  • - [Mark] How big is this tortoise?

  • You brought a lot, is it going to eat all that?

  • - Oh it's gonna eat all of it.

  • We'll probably run out of food before we're done

  • filming this segment.

  • - [Mark] Really?

  • - If you guys are ready, let's go meet Buckshot.

  • - [Mark] Buckshot, I like that name.

  • - Oh yeah, she's my buddy.

  • (gasps)

  • There you are.

  • - [Mark] Oh my goodness.

  • - Hi Buckshot.

  • This is the Galapagos tortoise,

  • the largest tortoise species in the world.

  • And what we're gonna do today,

  • is feed her her dinner.

  • Buckshot, hey, where are you going?

  • All the food's over here.

  • First bite.

  • Oh, there's a big tortoise poop, did you step in that?

  • - [Man] I may have stepped on the tortoise poop.

  • - [Mike] Did I do it?

  • Oh, I might've done it.

  • Aw, it's on my boot.

  • - [Coyote] Oh man, dude, oh.

  • Mark stepped in the tortoise poop.

  • - [Mark] Oh it's on this foot, too?

  • - [Coyote] Nope.

  • - [Mark] It's just that side.

  • - Okay, Buckshot come this way, away from the poop.

  • Come over here, come on sweetie.

  • - [Mark] Buckshot.

  • - [Coyote] There we go.

  • Now one very distinct thing about tortoises

  • and turtles, is the length of that neck.

  • And she's holding up the entire weight of her body

  • and stretching out her neck.

  • And they would do this in the wild to forage

  • for plants that are higher up.

  • She could pull them down, fruits and berries.

  • - [Mark] Listen to those chompers.

  • - Look at the chomp of that beak.

  • Now I'm trying to pay attention to where your

  • camera's at Mark, but I also have to pay attention

  • to her beak, because you see when she bites out,

  • she bites and lunges her head forward.

  • And I do not want to lose a finger in that beak.

  • Ooh, that's a little close there.

  • We are in south Florida right now.

  • And this is one of the only Galapagos tortoises

  • in captivity here in this area.

  • And we were given the opportunity to film with her.

  • Now she is 25 years old and she weighs 140 pounds.

  • She actually just almost bit my nose right there.

  • No, my nose is not romaine lettuce.

  • And she is an absolute giant.

  • This tortoise weighs just about as much as I do.

  • I weigh 155 pounds, so this creature is absolutely massive.

  • And oh boy, she's about to step on top of my leg.

  • Oh, watch this, this is cool.

  • Watch how high she can bounce up her 140 pound body.

  • You see that?

  • - [Mark] I can't even get it all in the frame, wow.

  • - It's like a brachiosaurus, eating leaves

  • at the top of a tree.

  • Now the Galapagos tortoise is an herbivore,

  • and they get a large percentage of their moisture

  • through the food that they eat.

  • And you can see how juicy,

  • ooh, getting close to my fingers.

  • Okay, we're moving on to the next piece.

  • You can see how juicy a lot of these vegetables are.

  • Oh here's something.

  • Look at this.

  • Oh, look at that.

  • Look at that.

  • Look at that, she's standing on my leg.

  • She is like squishing my ankle.

  • Ha, I never thought I would be feeding a Galapagos tortoise.

  • I hope that one day we can end up on Galapagos Island

  • or one of the islands.

  • Oh that's better.

  • Now she's not actually on my ankle.

  • And feed some of these tortoises in the wild.

  • How about the cucumber?

  • Let's have some cucumber.

  • That is my personal favorite.

  • There you go.

  • - [Mark] You know what you should do,

  • a Lady and the Tramp.

  • - With the cucumber?

  • - [Mark] Put one end in your mouth.

  • - Ready?

  • (romantic music)

  • Oh, she's standing on me, ready?

  • - [Mark] Keep going, one more bite.

  • - It's too close to my nose.

  • - [Mark] No no no, it'll be fine.

  • (vinyl record scratches)

  • (laughing)

  • - It's too close, if she gets my nose.

  • (laughing)

  • - [Mark] Is there any more cucumber in the bag?

  • - Oh jeez.

  • I'm telling you, if I get my finger stuck in that beak,

  • it is gonna be game over.

  • She can easily snip off the tip of my finger.

  • Oow, oow!

  • She crushed my shin.

  • Oh she did, maybe she's after these.

  • At 25 years old, she is only about a fifth of the size.

  • Now at 140 pounds, they can grow to be close

  • to a thousand pounds.

  • - [Mark] Wow.

  • - Imagine something that is five times this size.

  • Look at this, this is me hugging a tortoise.

  • Let me see if I can hear her heartbeat.

  • No, nothing inside of that solid bone carapace.

  • Wow, I am in just such awe of this creature.

  • It is massive, can you believe this?

  • - [Mark] And this is rare.

  • There's not like a Galapagos tortoise

  • in every street corner.

  • - No, many zoos do have Galapagos tortoises,

  • but they're actually really hard to take care of

  • in captivity, so this is a very unique situation for us

  • to be able to get up close with this animal.

  • And like I said, I would love to be

  • on the island of Galapagos someday,

  • filming these creatures in the wild.