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  • >> Announcer: Live from Austin Texas, it's theCUBE,

  • covering South by Southwest 2017, brought to you by Intel.

  • Now, here's John Furrier.

  • >> Welcome back everyone, we are live at the Intel AI Lounge,

  • end of the day, day one at South by Southwest,

  • I'm John Furrier, this is theCUBE,

  • our flagship programming brought to the events

  • and extract a signal from the noise.

  • What a day it is here, it's the packed venue, AI Lounge,

  • with Intel, it's the hottest spot in South by Southwest,

  • of course, where our theme is AI for social good,

  • and our next guest is Bryce Olson with Intel,

  • and your title officially is, global marketing director

  • health and live services, but you are an amazing story,

  • cancer survivor, but a fighter,

  • you took it to technology to stop your cancer,

  • and also, a composer with your friend, called FACTS,

  • Fighting Advanced Cancer Through Song, the stories.

  • Welcome to theCUBE! >> Thank you,

  • it's great to be here, this is awesome,

  • this is amazing environment that we're in today.

  • But yeah, you're right, when you look at data,

  • genomics data, which is looking at your DNA,

  • and running that out and being able to understand

  • what could potentially be fueling disease,

  • that's the biggest of big data.

  • And when I was working at Intel,

  • I was in a non-healthcare oriented group,

  • and then all of a sudden, I got hit with cancer,

  • like very aggressive, advanced cancer.

  • And I went through the whole standard of care,

  • and I went through that one-size-fits-all

  • spin that wheel of treatments and hopefully

  • you get something kind of thing, nothing--

  • >> General purpose, chemotherapy, whatever, blah blah blah.

  • >> Nothing worked.

  • And I came to the point where I was start to come to terms

  • with the fact that I may not see my daughter

  • get through elementary school.

  • So, cancer's starting to grow again, I go back to work,

  • at this point, I only want to work in healthcare,

  • because, why would I want to do anything else?

  • I want to try to--

  • >> John: But you have terminal cancer at this point.

  • >> I have terminal cancer at this point,

  • but I'm not sick yet.

  • You know, I went through all the chemo and all that crap,

  • but I'm not sick yet.

  • So, I asked to get into Intel's healthcare group,

  • because I want to try to help healthcare providers

  • make this digital transformation.

  • They let me in, and what I found out kind of blew my mind.

  • I learned about this new space of genomics

  • and precision medicine.

  • >> Well, it turns out, hold on for a second,

  • you were telling me the story before,

  • but you skipped a step, it turns out

  • Intel has a lot of work going on,

  • so you come into Intel, you're like,

  • they open up the kimono--

  • >> Open up the kimono, and I learn about this new era

  • called, just basically genomics, so what is genomics?

  • Genomics, essentially, is a way

  • to look at disease differently.

  • Why can't we go in and find out what's fueling disease

  • deep in the DNA?

  • Because every disease is diagnosable by DNA,

  • we just have never had the technology,

  • and the science, combining together

  • to get to that answer before.

  • Now we do.

  • So I found out that Intel is working

  • with all these genomic sequencing companies

  • to increase the throughput so you can actually

  • take something that costs $2 billion dollars back in 2003,

  • and took 10 years to do, get it down to $1,000

  • and do it in a day, right?

  • So now, it democratizes sequencing,

  • so we can look at what's fueling disease and get the data.

  • Then I learned about Intel working with all these major

  • bioinformatics open stores and commercial providers,

  • the Broad Institute at MIT, Harvard,

  • largest genomic sequencing place on the planet,

  • about how they take that data and then analyze it,

  • get to what is really fueling disease.

  • And then I learn about the cool things

  • we're doing with customers, which I could talk about,

  • like actual hospitals. >> Well, let's hold on

  • for a second on that, your shirt says Sequence Me,

  • but this is really key for the audience out there listening

  • and watching, is that, literally 10 years ago

  • the costs were astronomical, no one could afford it.

  • Big grants, philanthropy-funded R&D centers,

  • now, literally, you had your genome sequenced

  • for thousands of dollars.

  • >> Well, so, and this is what happened, right?

  • I learned about all this stuff that Intel's up to,

  • and I get kind of upset.

  • I get kind of pissed off, right?

  • Because nobody's giving this to me.

  • Nobody's sequencing my cancer, right?

  • So I go back to the cancer center that I was working with,

  • this is January 2015, turns out they were getting ready,

  • they were perfecting their lab diagnostic test on this,

  • it was like a perfect storm, they were ready, I wanted it,

  • they gave it to me, turns out my cancer

  • grows along this particular mutated pathway

  • that we had no idea.

  • >> So the data was, so in your DNA sequence step one,

  • step two is you go in massive compute power,

  • which is available, and you go look at it,

  • and it turns out there's a nuance to your cancer

  • that's identifiable!

  • >> Yeah, a needle in that haystack, right?

  • The signal in the noise, if you will, right?

  • So there's a specific molecular abnormality,

  • and in my case, there was a pathway that was out of control,

  • and the reason why I say it was out of control is,

  • the pathway was mutated, but then

  • there's this tumor suppressor gene

  • that's supposed to stop cancer, he's gone!

  • So it's like a freeway of traffic--

  • >> So he's checked out, and all of a sudden,

  • this is going wild, but this is cancer

  • for everyone has their own version of this.

  • >> Yes they do. >> So this is now

  • a new opportunity.

  • >> Yes!

  • Now we understand what's fueling my unique cancer.

  • We took data, we took technology and science,

  • and we got to the point where we understand

  • what's fueling my cancer.

  • With that data, I find a clinical trial

  • testing a new inhibitor of that pathway.

  • >> So I just got to stop and just pause,

  • because it's very emotional, and first of all,

  • man, yours is an inspiration to me and everyone watching.

  • I'm looking at some sign this year at the Intel AI booth,

  • and it says, "Your amazing starts with Intel,"

  • this is truly an amazing story.

  • >> Yeah, thank you. >> It's really beyond amazing,

  • it's life saving!

  • >> And that's what happened to me.

  • >> This is now at the beginning, so take me through,

  • in your mind, where is the progress bar on this,

  • in the AI evolution, or when I say AI,

  • I mean like machine learning, compute,

  • end-to-end technology innovation.

  • It's available, obviously, when is it going to be mainstream?

  • >> Yeah, so, we're at a point right now where

  • we can go in, if you have advanced cancer,

  • we're at a point now where we can sequence

  • that person's cancer and find out what's driving it,

  • we can do that.

  • But where it's going to get problematic is,

  • look at my case.

  • The mutated pathway hypersegmented by cancer, right,

  • so prostate cancer, a common cancer,

  • now became a rare cancer, because we hypersegmented it

  • by DNA, and I went after a treatment that was targeted,

  • so when my cancer starts to grow again,

  • now I'm a rare cancer.

  • So how are going to find people that are just like me

  • out there in the world?

  • >> So your point about rare being,

  • there's no comparable data to look at benchmarking,

  • so that's the challenge. >> Yeah, no given hospital

  • will ever have enough data in this new molecular

  • genomics-guided medicine world to solve my problem,

  • because the doctors are going to want to look,

  • and they're going to say, "Who out there looks just like Bryce

  • "from a DNA perspective, uniquely?

  • "What treatments were given to people like that,

  • "and what were the outcomes?"