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  • Welcome to the first video in our Ten Gigabit Home Area Network Series. I'm going to cover

  • five major points why it is finally time for ten gigabit networking at home, and the small

  • business office. I'm going to be brief and realistic as possible. Then in the following

  • video I'm going to show you how to do it. It's essential to watch this video so you

  • understand important concepts necessary to blow the doors off your tired one gig networking

  • gear. So let's get started.

  • What: Ten Gigabit networking has been around for

  • a while now, actually since 2002 when 10Gb fiber was introduced. Then in 2006 SFP+ Direct

  • Attach Copper (DAC) hit the market and grew in popularity due to it being cheaper, lower

  • latency, and lower power consumption. Also in 2006 10GBASE-T Copper was released, which

  • requires the use of a category 6, 6a, or 7 twisted pair cable. These cables showed a

  • slightly higher latency and higher degree of power consumption, in addition to the bulkier

  • cable profile. Many believe these factors are what led a greater adoption of Direct

  • Attach Copper. Although, as switch vendors work to lower the power consumption of 10GBASE-T,

  • and pricing comes down, many will start to consider 10GBASE-T over Direct Attach Copper

  • as it's more flexible from a structured cabling point of view. So currently it's a matter

  • of low latency and low power (Direct Attach Copper) versus longer runs, and custom cable

  • lengths by terminating them in-house (Cat6, 6a and 7).

  • Why: Why do I need a ten gigabit network for my

  • Home Area Network (HAN) or Small Office Home Office (SOHO) you say? Well there are many

  • reasons and I'll list a few of them here for you to chew on. Obviously it's not for everyone.

  • That's a decision you will have to make for yourself. I'm just presenting the case why

  • I feel it's finally time to hit the "10G Turbo Button" on your pent-up PC.

  • First, I'll start with the 800 pound gorilla in the room, or should I say 1/10th pound

  • SSD in the PC. Solid State Drives have revolutionized storage transfer speeds across the consumer

  • spectrum. Add to that PCIe SSD, mSATA, m.2 and the many other SSD based technologies

  • to follow. Let me put it this way; A single Western Digital Green drive can already max

  • out a one gigabit network link! What?!? You say, that's crazy talk? Nope, Western Digital

  • specs for a Green drive currently show sustained transfer speeds of 123 MB/s for a 3TB model.

  • 123 MB/s is 984 Mb/s. There's goes your one gig link up in smoke!

  • Second, RAM matters! Have you ever noticed on the vendor spec sheets, sometimes they

  • list the buffer to host transfer speed separate from the drive to host (sustained) speeds?

  • Well if we look back at the line "buffer to host" that same Green drive says 6 Gb/s. Really?

  • Sweet! Oh ya, and you have your operating system caching files on top of that too! And

  • here's the kicker, your operating system is not limited to 6 Gb/s. That is a limitation

  • of the SATA III protocol. What I'm trying to say, is that your various levels of cache

  • provide an incredible boost on top of your storage drive speeds. So let's review, we

  • are currently somewhere north of 6 Gb/s transfer speeds.

  • Third, there are a lot of miscellaneous considerations depending on what tech you employ at home

  • or in the small office. For example, are you using RAID-based storage to serve up your

  • data? Depending on how the RAID is implemented it could be pushing a ton of data, but you'll

  • never see the speed because you are capped at 1 Gb/s (125 MB/s). But what about Link

  • Aggregation (LAG) or Teamed NICs? I should be able to combine multiple interfaces to

  • get more than 1 Gb/s, right? Yes and No. There's a big caveat here. You still can't exceed

  • 1 Gb/s if you are only connected using a single session. Now, if you are transferring using

  • the Link Aggregation pipe and someone else makes another connection across the same pipe,

  • they will have access to another slice of that 1 Gig aggregate. Keep in mind protocols

  • play a major role in performance and network utilization. After all, this is a complicated

  • topic. You didn't think this was going to be easy, did you? In upcoming videos, we are

  • going to be walking you through a few strategies to squeeze the remaining bits from this sometimes

  • ugly tech lemon.

  • Who: Okay, now we are going to talk about who would

  • benefit from 10 gig connectivity. I'm not going to spend much time on this topic since

  • you probably have a good idea by now, if you are interested in exploring what 10 gig performance

  • can do for you. This video series is targeting your average geek, small business (SOHO),

  • technology enthusiast, gamers, and really just people that enjoy working with stupid

  • fast speeds. If setup correctly, you'll be transferring files pointlessly just to partake

  • in the sheer power and awesomeness that is 10 Gig networking.

  • When: When should people demand 10 gig at home?

  • Right now! Do you like massive amounts of performance even if you can't justify it?

  • Absolutely! Let's review. The Direct Attach Copper and 10GBASE-T standards, along with

  • available hardware, have been in place since 2007. That was 8 years ago! Seriously, why

  • am I not using this in my business or at home? Eight years is a long time in the IT world,

  • and a lot can happen in that timeframe. Point in case, it would take 14 hours 39 minutes

  • to transfer 6 TB over a 1 Gig connection. With a 10 Gig connection that time would be

  • reduced to 1 hour 28 minutes. If you are wondering, I pulled these figures from an online calculator.

  • Of course these numbers are based on pure calculation, but you get the point.

  • Where: Alright, now you've decided you want a piece

  • of this delicious 10 Gig pie? I'm going to talk about what ingredients to use, and where

  • exactly to use them. You will need to identify the location in your network where you stand

  • to gain the most benefit, and work outward from there. Using my Home Area Network as

  • an example, I identified three main systems that would see substantial gains by migrating

  • to a 10 Gig pipe. My workstation, VMware server, and Network Attached Storage (NAS) are poised

  • to take full advantage of 10 Gig speeds. My workstation is using SSDs, the VMware server

  • has local SSD storage, and my NAS is using software RAID in the form of ZFS. Now that

  • I've identified what systems will be upgraded to 10 Gig, I need to consider connectivity.

  • The goal is not to replace your existing 1 Gig connections with the 10 Gig links, but

  • instead add a 10 Gig port to each system. What we want to do is create a separate "storage"

  • or "high speed" network in effect. This will simplify troubleshooting, and make implementation

  • easier in a number of ways. This will eliminate path issues and isolate your high speed network,

  • keeping chatter to a minimum.

  • Join me in the following video, where we start with a simplified configuration. You only

  • need two hosts to talk, and this is known as peer-to-peer. I will circle back around,

  • in a third video of this series, and cover the above scenario where I described connecting

  • three systems together. In that video I have an awesome tip to share. If you want to keep

  • things affordable and upgrade your geek badge in the process, make sure you continue to

  • the next video in this series on the topic of ten gig peer-to-peer networking.

  • Don't forget to like this video, share it, and subscribe to get the follow-on videos!

  • Your support is tremendously appreciated, and I always look forward to your comments.

Welcome to the first video in our Ten Gigabit Home Area Network Series. I'm going to cover

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B1 US gig network copper gigabit storage networking

10Gb Home Network (P1) - Introduction

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    陳小雪 posted on 2017/04/06
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